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Brian Otis

Dr. Brian Otis
Associate Professor
Low power chip design. Wireless biosensors.
Click here for the Otis research group site

Phone: 206.616.5998
Office: M430, Paul Allen Center
E-mail: botis@uw.edu

University of California Berkeley, 2005 Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley, 2002 M.S.
University of Washington, Seattle, 1999 B.S.


Brian Otis joined the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering in 2005. His M.S. and Ph.D. were completed at U.C. Berkeley with Prof. Jan Rabaey. He has worked previously at the University of Washington Kelly Tremblay Brain and Behavior Laboratory, the U.C. Berkeley Ralph Freeman Neuroscience Lab, Intel Corporation, Agilent Laboratories, and Google Inc. He is a member of the Technical Program Committee of the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) and is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Solid State Circuits (JSSC).

Research Interests

One of my passions is exploring the fundamental limitations of power and size of integrated circuits and systems. I run a chip design research lab that designs tiny, low power chips for a variety of applications (neural recording, implants, active contact lenses, wearable on-body wireless sensors, environmental monitoring, etc). To realize these systems, we work on low power radios, systems running off wireless power transfer, systems integrated onto non-traditional substrates, and many types of biosignal interfaces.

Click here for a video on our Encounternet project.

In general, the interface between electronics the outside world is of interest to me: we have published on RF transceivers, biosignal interfaces, MEMS sensor interfaces, intertial sensors, etc. Finally, I have a strong interest in time/frequency references. Through a longstanding collaboration with Avago Technologies, we are working on extremely small, low power, and pure frequency references and clocks.

Please visit the Wireless Sensing Group website to learn more and download papers.


Teaching

Fall 2011: Undergraduate Radio Lab (ee400)

Spring 2011: Devices and Circuits II (ee332)

Winter 2011: Analog IC Design (ee473)

Fall 2010: Undergraduate Radio Lab. An Introduction to Wireless Circuits and Systems (ee400e)

Winter 2010: Devices and Circuits II (ee332)

Fall 2009: Linear Analog Integrated Circuit Design (ee473)

Spring 2009: Undergraduate Radio Lab. An Introduction to Wireless Circuits and Systems (ee400e)

Winter 2009: Devices and Circuits II (ee332)

Fall 2008: Linear Analog Integrated Circuit Design (ee473)

Spring 2008: Devices and Circuits II (ee332)

Fall 2007: Linear Analog Integrated Circuit Design (ee473)

Spring 2007: Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit Design & Analysis (ee538)

Winter 2007: Topics in Low Power Microsystems (ee500)

Fall 2006: Linear Analog Integrated Circuit Design (ee473)

Spring 2006: Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit Design & Analysis (ee538)

Fall 2005: Linear Analog Integrated Circuit Design (ee473)

Interested in undergraduate independent study?

Honors

2011: U.W. College of Engineering Junior Faculty Innovator Award
2009: National Science Foundation CAREER Award
2008: University of Washington Electrical Engineering Outstanding Teaching Award
2007: University of Washington Electrical Engineering Outstanding Research Advisor Award
2004: Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center Industrial Advisory Board Best Paper Award
2004: Analog Devices Outstanding Designer Fellowship
2003: U.C. Berkeley EECS Dept. Seven Rosen Funds Departmental Award for Innovation
2003: ISLPED Student Design Contest Competition Award
2002: ISSCC Jack Raper Outstanding Paper Award

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