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8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows

In a partnership with the University of Washington, Amazon Catalyst supports bold solutions to world problems.

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8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows Banner

UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband

The UW is one of 19 universities awarded the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) grant to develop performance analysis tools for the proposed next-generation broadband LTE based FirstNet.

Learn More

UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband Banner

Alum Tong Zhang awarded the 2017 Graduate School Distinguished Dissertation Award in Mathematics, Physical Sciences and Engineering

Tong Zhang (Ph.D. ’17) received the highly-competitive award for his thesis on breakthrough full-duplex wireless communication.

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Alum Tong Zhang awarded the 2017 Graduate School Distinguished Dissertation Award in Mathematics, Physical Sciences and Engineering Banner

UW team achieves a factor of 10 performance improvement for BCI Recording Systems

UW researchers present a system that addresses BCI challenges, increasing channel recording density by ten times current state-of-the-art systems.

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UW team achieves a factor of 10 performance improvement for BCI  Recording Systems Banner

Professor Bruce Darling receives COE Faculty Award in Teaching

The College of Engineering award recognizes a faculty member who demonstrates outstanding contributions to engineering education.

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Professor Bruce Darling receives COE Faculty Award in Teaching Banner

UW researchers develop world's first battery-free phone

The breakthrough technology harvests the few microwatts of power it requires from either ambient radio signals or light to energize the device.

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UW researchers develop world's first battery-free phone Banner

News + Awards

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/uw-ee-leads-nist-pscr-grant-for-next-generation-broadband/
UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband

UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband

The UW is one of 19 universities awarded the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) grant to develop performance analysis tools for the proposed next-generation broadband LTE based FirstNet.

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/alum-tong-zhang-awarded-the-2017-graduate-school-distinguished-dissertation-award/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/8-faculty-named-2017-amazon-catalyst-fellows/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-advance-state-of-the-art-neural-recording-for-bci-applications/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/professor-bruce-darling-receives-coe-faculty-award-in-teaching/
http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/07/05/first-battery-free-cell-phone-makes-calls-by-harvesting-ambient-power/
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11019" align="alignleft" width="385"] Professors Sumit Roy and Tom Henderson[/caption]

The University of Washington (UW) is one of 19 universities awarded the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) grant to develop performance analysis tools for the proposed next-generation broadband LTE based FirstNet (for emergency/first responders). The grant is part of the First Responders Network Authority (FirstNet) appropriations.

Congress has allocated FirstNet 20 MHz of spectrum in 700 MHz band and up to $7 billion in funding for the construction of a nationwide network (awarded to AT&T in a public-private partnership model), achieving a major recommendation post 9/11 for a single interoperable platform with the requisite capacity for new features. These features integrate new data, voice and location-based services.

“UW EE is in a unique position to offer support to these efforts due to the department’s key long-standing role in developing the network simulator ns-3,” UW electrical engineering (UW EE) Professor and PI on the grant Sumit Roy said.

[caption id="attachment_1281" align="alignright" width="189"] Professor Jim Ritcey[/caption]

The proposed analytical studies will initially focus on benchmarking currently used by P-25 digital Land Mobile Radio (LMR) systems intended for primarily voice communications. UW EE researchers will identify a set of emergency scenarios and create corresponding traffic (demand) models for analyzing the next-generation of LTE-based public safety network architecture.

This research presents an opportunity for UW EE to partner with the City of Seattle CIO’s office to analyze the city’s emergency response units current operations and prospects for broadband LTE adoption.

“A key component of our proposal is the engagement with the local First Responder community,” Roy said. “Currently, there is a lack of more fine-grained demand models for both a daily routine basis as well as when emergencies at various scales and types occur, such as fire, significant traffic, other incidents or a natural disaster; it would help answer key questions, like availability and performance of public safety (PS) networks in such `stressed’ scenarios. As a cornerstone of our proposed effort, our work would greatly benefit from the availability of local data (from City or County Police/Fire/EMT) to refine and tune our models. In turn, we could then conduct techno-economic studies that highlight cost-benefit considerations for broadband LTE adoption for PS and assist the City and State with inputs or recommendations during the next stage of policymaking in this regard.”

Co-PIs on the two-year grant, entitled “Modeling, Simulation and Performance Evaluation for Future Public Safety Communications Networks,” include UW EE Professor Jim Ritcey and Affiliate Professor Tom Henderson.
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Tong Zhang (Ph.D. ’17) received the highly competitive University of Washington (UW) 2017 Graduate School Distinguished Dissertation Award in Mathematics, Physical Sciences and Engineering for his UW electrical engineering doctoral thesis.

The thesis, entitled “Integrated Wideband Self-interference Cancellation Techniques for FDD and Full-duplex Wireless Communication,” was the top dissertation in the Mathematics, Physical Sciences and Engineering category. As a graduate student, Zhang worked with Professor Chris Rudell in the Future Analog System Technologies (FAST) Lab.

Throughout his successful academic career, Zhang has received several significant honors, including the prestigious 2016 IEEE Solid-State Circuit Society Pre-Doctoral Award and the UW EE department’s Yang Research Award. Recently, Zhang was the lead author on breakthrough full duplex communication research, which illustrates the impact of his dissertation research.

This is the first time in the UW EE department’s history that a Ph.D. student has received the top dissertation award.
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UW EE Professors Les Atlas, Karl Böhringer, Howard Chizeck, Blake Hannaford, Eric Klavins, Arka Majumdar, Shwetak Patel and Joshua Smith were awarded the Amazon Catalyst Fellowship this past year.  In a partnership with the University of Washington, Amazon Catalyst supports bold solutions to world problems. The program provides funding, mentorship and community to the innovative projects.

Learn more about their projects below:

simsong.org
PI: Les Atlas

Active self-cleaning technology for solar panels
PI: Karl Böhringer

Haptic Passwords
PI: Howard Chizeck

IRA, the robot surgical assistant
PI: Blake Hannaford

UW BIOFAB: A cloud laboratory for genetic engineering
PI: Eric Klavins

Smart Eyewear
PI: Arka Majumdar

OsteoApp
PI: Shwetak Patel

Enabling district shared parking via energy harvesting wireless sensing technology
PI: Joshua Smith
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10991" align="alignleft" width="458"] From left: Dr. Anthony Smith and Professor Visvesh Sathe[/caption]

Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) offer a direct communication pathway between the brain and external technologies. BCIs are of significant research interest for their potential role in repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions for conditions like stroke and paralysis.

Although BCIs present great opportunities for brain to device connectivity, there are several challenges in application: next-generation BCIs require a large number of neural recording and stimulation electrodes for broad and dense coverage. Existing recording electronics techniques are unable to scale to these large counts without a prohibitive increase in silicon-die area. Further, BCIs generate large stimulation artifacts, obscuring important signals shortly after stimulation.

In an article, entitled “A Scalable, Highly-Multiplexed Delta-Encoded Digital Feedback ECoG Recording Amplifier with Common and Differential-Mode Artifact Suppression,” UW researchers present a system that addresses these challenges, increasing channel recording density by ten times current state-of-the-art systems.

“The focus of the effort was on developing architectural techniques that could be leveraged to allow us to design high-density recording electronics,” UW electrical engineering Assistant Professor and PI on the project Visvesh Sathe said. “The system allows for highly multiplexed recording channels, exploiting the inherent structure in neural signals to achieve high precision recording using simple, robust circuits. The system also suppresses, for the first time, both common-mode and differential-mode artifacts.”

The system is useful for a variety of bio-potential signal acquisition applications, offering support to researchers when signals from the human body have to be read. This process expands to numerous medical applications, including nervous system diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

"This work is a first step toward a realistic Bidirectional Brain Computer Interface on a single chip,” senior author on the paper Anthony Smith (Ph.D. ’17) said. “The next step will be integrating this system with the CMOS-compatible stimulation platform that has also been developed at UW and adding on-chip computation to enable closed-loop operation."

Additional authors on the paper include UW electrical engineering graduate student John Uehlin, UW physiology and biophysics Research Associate Steve Perlmutter and UW electrical engineering Associate Professor Chris Rudell.

The work is funded by the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE), a UW-based center established through the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers (NSF ERC) program.
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10986" align="alignleft" width="407"] From left: Dean Michael Bragg, Professor Bruce Darling and bioengineering Professor Wendy Thomas[/caption]

UW electrical engineering (UW EE) professor Bruce Darling was awarded the College of Engineering Faculty Award in Teaching for his outstanding contributions to engineering education. The annual award recognizes a faculty member who fosters innovative and lasting contributions to engineering education and displays high-level commitment to students both in and outside of the classroom.

Professor Darling has a 37-year career with the engineering department; he has been instrumental in laying the foundation for several UW EE curricula and launched a microfabrication laboratory.

Throughout his time in the department, he has remained dedicated to his students. Recently, as a faculty advisor, Professor Darling supported students as they launched EcoCar to national competition, receiving first place for their topic paper and presentation for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Innovation Award.
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                    [post_title] => UW researchers develop world's first battery-free phone
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http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/uw-ee-leads-nist-pscr-grant-for-next-generation-broadband/
UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband

UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband

The UW is one of 19 universities awarded the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) grant to develop performance analysis tools for the proposed next-generation broadband LTE based FirstNet.

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/alum-tong-zhang-awarded-the-2017-graduate-school-distinguished-dissertation-award/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/8-faculty-named-2017-amazon-catalyst-fellows/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-advance-state-of-the-art-neural-recording-for-bci-applications/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/professor-bruce-darling-receives-coe-faculty-award-in-teaching/
http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/07/05/first-battery-free-cell-phone-makes-calls-by-harvesting-ambient-power/
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The grant is part of the First Responders Network Authority (FirstNet) appropriations. Congress has allocated FirstNet 20 MHz of spectrum in 700 MHz band and up to $7 billion in funding for the construction of a nationwide network (awarded to AT&T in a public-private partnership model), achieving a major recommendation post 9/11 for a single interoperable platform with the requisite capacity for new features. These features integrate new data, voice and location-based services. “UW EE is in a unique position to offer support to these efforts due to the department’s key long-standing role in developing the network simulator ns-3,” UW electrical engineering (UW EE) Professor and PI on the grant Sumit Roy said. [caption id="attachment_1281" align="alignright" width="189"] Professor Jim Ritcey[/caption] The proposed analytical studies will initially focus on benchmarking currently used by P-25 digital Land Mobile Radio (LMR) systems intended for primarily voice communications. UW EE researchers will identify a set of emergency scenarios and create corresponding traffic (demand) models for analyzing the next-generation of LTE-based public safety network architecture. This research presents an opportunity for UW EE to partner with the City of Seattle CIO’s office to analyze the city’s emergency response units current operations and prospects for broadband LTE adoption. “A key component of our proposal is the engagement with the local First Responder community,” Roy said. “Currently, there is a lack of more fine-grained demand models for both a daily routine basis as well as when emergencies at various scales and types occur, such as fire, significant traffic, other incidents or a natural disaster; it would help answer key questions, like availability and performance of public safety (PS) networks in such `stressed’ scenarios. As a cornerstone of our proposed effort, our work would greatly benefit from the availability of local data (from City or County Police/Fire/EMT) to refine and tune our models. In turn, we could then conduct techno-economic studies that highlight cost-benefit considerations for broadband LTE adoption for PS and assist the City and State with inputs or recommendations during the next stage of policymaking in this regard.” Co-PIs on the two-year grant, entitled “Modeling, Simulation and Performance Evaluation for Future Public Safety Communications Networks,” include UW EE Professor Jim Ritcey and Affiliate Professor Tom Henderson. [post_title] => UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ee-leads-nist-pscr-grant-for-next-generation-broadband [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-14 14:28:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-14 21:28:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11018 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11010 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-13 10:00:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-13 17:00:48 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11014" align="alignleft" width="452"] Tong Zhang[/caption] Tong Zhang (Ph.D. ’17) received the highly competitive University of Washington (UW) 2017 Graduate School Distinguished Dissertation Award in Mathematics, Physical Sciences and Engineering for his UW electrical engineering doctoral thesis. The thesis, entitled “Integrated Wideband Self-interference Cancellation Techniques for FDD and Full-duplex Wireless Communication,” was the top dissertation in the Mathematics, Physical Sciences and Engineering category. As a graduate student, Zhang worked with Professor Chris Rudell in the Future Analog System Technologies (FAST) Lab. Throughout his successful academic career, Zhang has received several significant honors, including the prestigious 2016 IEEE Solid-State Circuit Society Pre-Doctoral Award and the UW EE department’s Yang Research Award. Recently, Zhang was the lead author on breakthrough full duplex communication research, which illustrates the impact of his dissertation research. This is the first time in the UW EE department’s history that a Ph.D. student has received the top dissertation award. [post_title] => Alum Tong Zhang awarded the 2017 Graduate School Distinguished Dissertation Award in Mathematics, Physical Sciences and Engineering [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => alum-tong-zhang-awarded-the-2017-graduate-school-distinguished-dissertation-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-20 10:28:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-20 17:28:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11010 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11006 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-19 16:14:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-19 23:14:01 [post_content] => UW EE Professors Les Atlas, Karl Böhringer, Howard Chizeck, Blake Hannaford, Eric Klavins, Arka Majumdar, Shwetak Patel and Joshua Smith were awarded the Amazon Catalyst Fellowship this past year.  In a partnership with the University of Washington, Amazon Catalyst supports bold solutions to world problems. The program provides funding, mentorship and community to the innovative projects. Learn more about their projects below: simsong.org PI: Les Atlas Active self-cleaning technology for solar panels PI: Karl Böhringer Haptic Passwords PI: Howard Chizeck IRA, the robot surgical assistant PI: Blake Hannaford UW BIOFAB: A cloud laboratory for genetic engineering PI: Eric Klavins Smart Eyewear PI: Arka Majumdar OsteoApp PI: Shwetak Patel Enabling district shared parking via energy harvesting wireless sensing technology PI: Joshua Smith [post_title] => 8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-faculty-named-2017-amazon-catalyst-fellows [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-20 10:34:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-20 17:34:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11006 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10990 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-07 14:06:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-07 21:06:13 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10991" align="alignleft" width="458"] From left: Dr. Anthony Smith and Professor Visvesh Sathe[/caption] Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) offer a direct communication pathway between the brain and external technologies. BCIs are of significant research interest for their potential role in repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions for conditions like stroke and paralysis. Although BCIs present great opportunities for brain to device connectivity, there are several challenges in application: next-generation BCIs require a large number of neural recording and stimulation electrodes for broad and dense coverage. Existing recording electronics techniques are unable to scale to these large counts without a prohibitive increase in silicon-die area. Further, BCIs generate large stimulation artifacts, obscuring important signals shortly after stimulation. In an article, entitled “A Scalable, Highly-Multiplexed Delta-Encoded Digital Feedback ECoG Recording Amplifier with Common and Differential-Mode Artifact Suppression,” UW researchers present a system that addresses these challenges, increasing channel recording density by ten times current state-of-the-art systems. “The focus of the effort was on developing architectural techniques that could be leveraged to allow us to design high-density recording electronics,” UW electrical engineering Assistant Professor and PI on the project Visvesh Sathe said. “The system allows for highly multiplexed recording channels, exploiting the inherent structure in neural signals to achieve high precision recording using simple, robust circuits. The system also suppresses, for the first time, both common-mode and differential-mode artifacts.” The system is useful for a variety of bio-potential signal acquisition applications, offering support to researchers when signals from the human body have to be read. This process expands to numerous medical applications, including nervous system diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. "This work is a first step toward a realistic Bidirectional Brain Computer Interface on a single chip,” senior author on the paper Anthony Smith (Ph.D. ’17) said. “The next step will be integrating this system with the CMOS-compatible stimulation platform that has also been developed at UW and adding on-chip computation to enable closed-loop operation." Additional authors on the paper include UW electrical engineering graduate student John Uehlin, UW physiology and biophysics Research Associate Steve Perlmutter and UW electrical engineering Associate Professor Chris Rudell. The work is funded by the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE), a UW-based center established through the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers (NSF ERC) program. [post_title] => UW team achieves a factor of 10 performance improvement for BCI Recording Systems [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-advance-state-of-the-art-neural-recording-for-bci-applications [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-18 14:02:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-18 21:02:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10990 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10985 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-06 10:36:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-06 17:36:06 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10986" align="alignleft" width="407"] From left: Dean Michael Bragg, Professor Bruce Darling and bioengineering Professor Wendy Thomas[/caption] UW electrical engineering (UW EE) professor Bruce Darling was awarded the College of Engineering Faculty Award in Teaching for his outstanding contributions to engineering education. The annual award recognizes a faculty member who fosters innovative and lasting contributions to engineering education and displays high-level commitment to students both in and outside of the classroom. Professor Darling has a 37-year career with the engineering department; he has been instrumental in laying the foundation for several UW EE curricula and launched a microfabrication laboratory. Throughout his time in the department, he has remained dedicated to his students. Recently, as a faculty advisor, Professor Darling supported students as they launched EcoCar to national competition, receiving first place for their topic paper and presentation for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Innovation Award. [post_title] => Professor Bruce Darling receives COE Faculty Award in Teaching [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-bruce-darling-receives-coe-faculty-award-in-teaching [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-06 10:36:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-06 17:36:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10985 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10980 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-05 13:32:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-05 20:32:12 [post_content] => [post_title] => UW researchers develop world's first battery-free phone [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-researchers-develop-worlds-first-battery-free-phone [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-05 13:36:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-05 20:36:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10980 [menu_order] => 7 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11018 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-14 10:51:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-14 17:51:28 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11019" align="alignleft" width="385"] Professors Sumit Roy and Tom Henderson[/caption] The University of Washington (UW) is one of 19 universities awarded the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) grant to develop performance analysis tools for the proposed next-generation broadband LTE based FirstNet (for emergency/first responders). The grant is part of the First Responders Network Authority (FirstNet) appropriations. Congress has allocated FirstNet 20 MHz of spectrum in 700 MHz band and up to $7 billion in funding for the construction of a nationwide network (awarded to AT&T in a public-private partnership model), achieving a major recommendation post 9/11 for a single interoperable platform with the requisite capacity for new features. These features integrate new data, voice and location-based services. “UW EE is in a unique position to offer support to these efforts due to the department’s key long-standing role in developing the network simulator ns-3,” UW electrical engineering (UW EE) Professor and PI on the grant Sumit Roy said. [caption id="attachment_1281" align="alignright" width="189"] Professor Jim Ritcey[/caption] The proposed analytical studies will initially focus on benchmarking currently used by P-25 digital Land Mobile Radio (LMR) systems intended for primarily voice communications. UW EE researchers will identify a set of emergency scenarios and create corresponding traffic (demand) models for analyzing the next-generation of LTE-based public safety network architecture. This research presents an opportunity for UW EE to partner with the City of Seattle CIO’s office to analyze the city’s emergency response units current operations and prospects for broadband LTE adoption. “A key component of our proposal is the engagement with the local First Responder community,” Roy said. “Currently, there is a lack of more fine-grained demand models for both a daily routine basis as well as when emergencies at various scales and types occur, such as fire, significant traffic, other incidents or a natural disaster; it would help answer key questions, like availability and performance of public safety (PS) networks in such `stressed’ scenarios. As a cornerstone of our proposed effort, our work would greatly benefit from the availability of local data (from City or County Police/Fire/EMT) to refine and tune our models. In turn, we could then conduct techno-economic studies that highlight cost-benefit considerations for broadband LTE adoption for PS and assist the City and State with inputs or recommendations during the next stage of policymaking in this regard.” Co-PIs on the two-year grant, entitled “Modeling, Simulation and Performance Evaluation for Future Public Safety Communications Networks,” include UW EE Professor Jim Ritcey and Affiliate Professor Tom Henderson. 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