Skip to main content

Professor Smith discusses how the IoT will change our daily lives

UW EE Professor Joshua Smith speaks with NBC News on how the Internet of Things (IoT) is transforming the way we communicate with the world around us.

Learn More

Professor Smith discusses how the IoT will change our daily lives Banner

Researchers achieve quantum dot solar cell world record

A collaboration between researchers at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory yielded a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells at 13.4 percent.

Learn More

Researchers achieve quantum dot solar cell world record Banner

Researchers reprogram yeast mating habits for the future of medicine

Researchers in the departments of electrical engineering and biochemistry collaborate to redesign yeast for multiple mating types, increasing the speed and efficiency of drug development.

Learn More

Researchers reprogram yeast mating habits for the future of medicine Banner

UW NNCI WNF celebrates completion of $37M remodel project

The NNCI Washington Nanofabrication Facility (WNF) held a ribbon cutting ceremony to recognize the completion of the nearly six-year project, which included a robust remodel of the facilities.

Learn More

UW NNCI WNF celebrates completion of $37M remodel project Banner

Researchers receive ASME JDSMC Kalman Best Paper Award

The authors received this top award for their research on electromechanical modeling for precise image capture.

Learn More

Researchers receive ASME JDSMC Kalman Best Paper Award Banner

WNF supports the development of flexible 'skin' for robots

Researchers from the UW and UCLA used the Washington Nanofabrication Facility (WNF) to develop a prosthetic skin for robots that has similar "feel" attributes as the human hand.

Learn More

WNF supports the development of flexible 'skin' for robots Banner

News + Awards

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/professor-smith-discusses-how-the-iot-will-change-our-daily-lives/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-achieve-quantum-dot-solar-cell-world-record/
Researchers achieve quantum dot solar cell world record

Researchers achieve quantum dot solar cell world record

A collaboration between researchers at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory yielded a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells at 13.4 percent.

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-reprogram-yeast-mating-habits-for-the-future-of-medicine/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/uw-nnci-wnf-celebrates-completion-of-37m-relaunch-project/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-receive-asme-jdsmc-kalman-best-paper-award/
http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/10/17/flexible-skin-can-help-robots-prosthetics-perform-everyday-tasks-by-sensing-shear-force/
581uweeViewNews Object
(
    [_showAnnouncements:protected] => 
    [_showTitle:protected] => 
    [showMore] => 
    [_type:protected] => spotlight
    [_from:protected] => newsawards_landing
    [_args:protected] => Array
        (
            [post_type] => spotlight
            [meta_query] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [key] => type
                            [value] => news
                            [compare] => LIKE
                        )

                )

            [posts_per_page] => 6
            [post_status] => publish
        )

    [_jids:protected] => 
    [_taxa:protected] => Array
        (
        )

    [_meta:protected] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [key] => type
                    [value] => news
                    [compare] => LIKE
                )

        )

    [_metarelation:protected] => AND
    [_results:protected] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 11800
                    [post_author] => 12
                    [post_date] => 2017-11-13 15:12:21
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-13 23:12:21
                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2304" align="alignleft" width="176"] Professor Joshua Smith[/caption]

UW Professor of Electrical Engineering and Allen School Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Joshua Smith discusses our future in a world of technology - complete connectivity through the Internet. According to Smith, the Internet of Things (IoT) is already transforming the way we communicate with the world around us, from implantable devices that monitor our health to parking spaces that light up when a space is open.

See the complete article here.
                    [post_title] => Professor Smith discusses how the IoT will change our daily lives
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => professor-smith-discusses-how-the-iot-will-change-our-daily-lives
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2017-11-13 15:12:21
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-13 23:12:21
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11800
                    [menu_order] => 1
                    [post_type] => spotlight
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [1] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 11790
                    [post_author] => 12
                    [post_date] => 2017-11-07 15:58:42
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-07 23:58:42
                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11792" align="alignleft" width="482"] NREL senior scientist Joseph Luther and Dr. Erin Sanehira.[/caption]

A collaboration between researchers at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering (UW EE) and the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) yields a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells at 13.4 percent.

Quantum dots are incredibly small electronic materials. Ranging from 3 to 20 nanometers in size, they are about one million times smaller than a raindrop.  Because of their size, they possess advantageous optical properties. These properties make them valuable for photovoltaic use, or the process of converting light to electricity (i.e. material used in solar panels).

Researchers have been looking at quantum dots as a source of solar cells for nearly three decades. Their goal has centered around the concept of solar cell efficiency, which refers to the portion of energy in the form of sunlight that can be converted into electricity via photovoltaics. The initial quantum dot solar cells had an efficiency of 2.9 percent. Over the years, researchers have expanded this efficiency to 12 percent through a better understanding of the connectivity between individual quantum dots, better overall device structures and through the reduction of defects in lead sulfide quantum dots.

[caption id="attachment_2299" align="alignright" width="197"] Professor Lih Lin[/caption]

In a recent article, entitled "Enhanced mobility CsPbI3 quantum dot arrays for record-efficiency, high-voltage photovoltaic cells," researchers reached a new record of 13.4 percent. The article, which was published in the October 17th issue of Science Advances, details the reason behind the higher efficiency. The latest advancement in quantum dot solar cells utilizes a new material - cesium lead triiodide (CsPbI3).

CsPbI3 produces an exceptionally large voltage at open circuit, meaning that is allows a higher portion of sunlight to reach lower layers when paired with the material's bandgap. Voltage and the material's bandgap are two important factors when achieving higher efficiency in a multijunction solar cell.

Multijunction solar cells use different semiconductor materials, which interface between multiple p-n junctions. In the latest advancement, CsPbI3 can be paired with cheap thin-film perovskite materials. The multijunction approach is often used for space applications, where high efficiency is more critical than the cost to make a solar module. The research team's new finding can achieve a similar high efficiency as demonstrated for space solar cells. Built at lower costs than silicon technology, they are ideal for both terrestrial and space applications.

Former UW EE graduate student Erin Sanehira (Ph.D. '17) received a NASA fellowship to work on the research while a student at UW EE. She is first author on the paper. Her advisor, Professor Lih Lin is a Co-PI on the work. For Sanehira, the work expands the potential applications for quantum dot solar cells - from Earth to space.

“Often, the materials used in space and rooftop applications are totally different," Sanehira said in a recent article. "It is exciting to see possible configurations that could be used for both situations.”

Additional authors on the work include NREL researchers Ashley Marshall, Jeffrey Christians, Steven Harvey, Peter Ciesielski, Lance Wheeler, Philip Schulz, Matthew Beard and Co-PI Joseph Luther.

The NREL research was funded as part of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP) an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences with the Office of Science of the Department of Energy.
                    [post_title] => Researchers achieve quantum dot solar cell world record
                    [post_excerpt] => 
                    [post_status] => publish
                    [comment_status] => closed
                    [ping_status] => closed
                    [post_password] => 
                    [post_name] => researchers-achieve-quantum-dot-solar-cell-world-record
                    [to_ping] => 
                    [pinged] => 
                    [post_modified] => 2017-11-08 13:20:37
                    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-08 21:20:37
                    [post_content_filtered] => 
                    [post_parent] => 0
                    [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11790
                    [menu_order] => 2
                    [post_type] => spotlight
                    [post_mime_type] => 
                    [comment_count] => 0
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [2] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 11702
                    [post_author] => 12
                    [post_date] => 2017-11-03 16:06:07
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-03 23:06:07
                    [post_content] => 
[caption id="attachment_11704" align="alignleft" width="162" class="left none "] David Younger[/caption] [caption id="attachment_11705" align="alignleft" width="154" class="left none "] Stephanie Berger[/caption] [caption id="attachment_11706" align="alignleft" width="158" class="left none "] David Baker[/caption] [caption id="attachment_2315" align="alignleft" width="181" class="left none "]Eric Klavins Eric Klavins[/caption]
When developing new drug treatments for disease, researchers look to yeast. With its rapid cell cycle and the ease with which its genes can be tweaked, yeast is a flexible tool used to test how a particular drug, chemical or enzyme affects unicellular organisms (e.g. bacteria). Like human cells, yeast has a eukaryotic structure (nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria). It also shares many genes with human cells; yeast cells can be used to investigate how a particular drug affects a certain human gene. Although it identifies whether a new drug binds to what it's supposed to, it does not offer insight into whether the drug binds to anything else in human cells. For example, researchers can screen a new cancer drug for potentially dangerous interactions (e.g. unexpected cell death) prior to clinical trials. However, they can only look at these off-target interactions one at a time. A new paper by University of Washington (UW) electrical engineers and biochemists retools yeast's mating habits, so researchers can test hundreds of drugs against thousands of potential targets. The paper, entitled "High-throughput characterization of protein-protein interactions by reprogramming yeast mating," identifies how researchers used flourescent genetic markers to track yeast's natural mating types and subsequently build new "sexes" for yeast to bind to. The blue and red fluorescent markers that dot the yeast's cell surface indicate whether the microorganism has been mated (purple) or unmated (blue and red). The team played around with numerous proteins and recorded their interactions. Through tracking the mating efficiency, researchers could tell how strongly any two protein molecules interact. They then built new sexes based on the strongest protein interactions. The team put the results to the test. For the emerging cancer drug XCD07, researchers were able to identify the versions of the drug that only bound to the intended target. The researchers' goal is to share the tool for large-scale scientific research. The team has given the engineered yeast strains to several institutions, including Yale University, Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). For lead author David Younger, a UW electrical engineering postdoctoral researcher, he wants the research to enable a “comprehensive preclinical drug screening, rather than the current practice of screening a very small subset of possible off-target interactions.” Additional authors on the paper include UW biochemistry postdoctoral fellow Stephanie Berger, UW biochemistry Professor David Baker and UW electrical engineering Professor Eric Klavins.

---

More News:   [post_title] => Researchers reprogram yeast mating habits for the future of medicine [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-reprogram-yeast-mating-habits-for-the-future-of-medicine [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-03 16:25:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-03 23:25:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11702 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11696 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-11-02 14:56:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-02 21:56:36 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11697" align="alignleft" width="505"] Dr. Michael Khbeis was named the new director of the NNCI WNF.[/caption] On October 24, 2017, The University of Washington National Nanotechnology Coordinated Structure (NNCI) Washington Nanofabrication Facility (WNF)  officially opened the doors of its remodeled facility - a 15,000 square-foot space that offers an open-access cleanroom and expert resources to users. The environment further enhances the shared discovery and dissemination of new technologies focused on nanotechnology and fabrication processes. The WNF took over the space at the university's Fluke Hall in 2011.  Since then, the organization embarked on a nearly six-year, $37 million remodel project. The space began as an unrated cleanroom that was hindered  by failing infrastructure. The remodel transformed the space into a ISO Class 5/6 cleanroom facility that boasts a robust infrastructure with redundant systems. During the renovation, the WNF also added several new capital instruments that expand the nanoscale fabrication and characterization capabilities that are offered. At the October ceremony, UW Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering Professor Karl Böhringer announced that then associate director of the WNF, Michael Khbeis, would become the new director. For Khbeis, the future of the WNF is exciting. "Since taking over the lab in 2011, WNF experienced an operational transformation that led to about a 300 percent growth in utilization and revenue," Khbeis said. "There has been substantial growth from industrial clients that helped make the facility fiscally viable. While we expect continued growth of industrial users, now that construction is complete, we are hoping to focus our attention to fostering increased utilization by UW and other academic and government users. We are working with NanoEngineered Systems (NanoES) Institute (as well as the Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute [MolES] and the Clean Energy Institute [CEI]) to help find and apply for new research programs that will leverage the amazing capabilities being offered at WNF. We hope to engage in more education and outreach initiatives and attract UW students to career paths in nanoscale fabrication and characterization to meet the needs of a wide variety of industries."   [post_title] => UW NNCI WNF celebrates completion of $37M remodel project [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-nnci-wnf-celebrates-completion-of-37m-relaunch-project [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-02 14:58:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-02 21:58:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11696 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11660 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-10-30 11:44:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-30 18:44:22 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11661" align="alignleft" width="476"] From Left: Mechanical Engineering (ME) Chair Per Reinhall, ME Professor Eric Seibel, ME Professor Martin Berg and Electrical Engineering Professor Howard Chizeck.[/caption] Drs. Ivan Yeoh, Per Reinhall, Martin Berg, Howard Chizeck and Eric Seibel received the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control (JDSMC) Rudolf Kalman Best Paper Award for their paper "Electromechanical Modeling and Adaptive Feedforward Control of a Self-Sensing Scanning Fiber Endoscope." [caption id="attachment_11662" align="alignright" width="196"] Dr. Ivan Yeoh[/caption] The paper presents the first online-adaptive control strategy for the scanning fiber endoscope (SFE). The SFE was developed at the University of Washington (UW) Human Photonics Laboratory. It further advances current endoscopes (small cameras that are primarily used in medical diagnoses by physicians) by enhancing high-quality laser-based imaging technology. It uses an ultrathin and flexible endoscope, allowing physicians to circumnavigate difficult to reach internal tissues. The authors' adaptive feedforward control strategy helps anchor SFE, showing marked improvements in scan accuracy over previous control methods and operating environment adaptability. The Rudolf Kalman Best Paper Award is given annually by the Dynamic Systems and Control Division of ASME to the authors of the best paper published in the ASME JDSMC during the preceding year. Yeoh received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at the UW. Professor Reinhall is chair of the UW Department of Mechanical Engineering. Professor Howard Chizeck is a faculty member in electrical engineering. Professors Berg and Seibel are faculty in mechanical engineering. [post_title] => Researchers receive ASME JDSMC Kalman Best Paper Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-receive-asme-jdsmc-kalman-best-paper-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-30 11:45:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-30 18:45:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11660 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11644 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-10-23 11:24:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-23 18:24:33 [post_content] => [post_title] => WNF supports the development of flexible 'skin' for robots [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => wnf-supports-the-development-of-flexible-skin-for-robots [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-23 11:24:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-23 18:24:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11644 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => view-block [1] => block--spotlight-robust-news ) [_finalHTML:protected] =>
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/professor-smith-discusses-how-the-iot-will-change-our-daily-lives/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-achieve-quantum-dot-solar-cell-world-record/
Researchers achieve quantum dot solar cell world record

Researchers achieve quantum dot solar cell world record

A collaboration between researchers at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory yielded a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells at 13.4 percent.

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-reprogram-yeast-mating-habits-for-the-future-of-medicine/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/uw-nnci-wnf-celebrates-completion-of-37m-relaunch-project/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-receive-asme-jdsmc-kalman-best-paper-award/
http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/10/17/flexible-skin-can-help-robots-prosthetics-perform-everyday-tasks-by-sensing-shear-force/
[_postID:protected] => 184 [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) [_block:protected] => [_db:protected] => WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [post_type] => spotlight [meta_query] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [key] => type [value] => news [compare] => LIKE ) ) [posts_per_page] => 6 [post_status] => publish ) [query_vars] => Array ( [post_type] => spotlight [meta_query] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [key] => type [value] => news [compare] => LIKE ) ) [posts_per_page] => 6 [post_status] => publish [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [static] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [orderby] => menu_order [order] => ASC [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => ) [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [queried_terms] => Array ( ) [primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID ) [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [key] => type [value] => news [compare] => LIKE ) [relation] => OR ) [relation] => AND [meta_table] => wp_postmeta [meta_id_column] => post_id [primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_postmeta ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( [wp_postmeta] => Array ( [key] => type [value] => news [compare] => LIKE [alias] => wp_postmeta [cast] => CHAR ) ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts INNER JOIN wp_postmeta ON ( wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id ) WHERE 1=1 AND ( ( wp_postmeta.meta_key = 'type' AND wp_postmeta.meta_value LIKE '%news%' ) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'spotlight' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.menu_order ASC LIMIT 0, 6 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11800 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-11-13 15:12:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-13 23:12:21 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2304" align="alignleft" width="176"] Professor Joshua Smith[/caption] UW Professor of Electrical Engineering and Allen School Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Joshua Smith discusses our future in a world of technology - complete connectivity through the Internet. According to Smith, the Internet of Things (IoT) is already transforming the way we communicate with the world around us, from implantable devices that monitor our health to parking spaces that light up when a space is open. See the complete article here. [post_title] => Professor Smith discusses how the IoT will change our daily lives [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-smith-discusses-how-the-iot-will-change-our-daily-lives [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-13 15:12:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-13 23:12:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11800 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11790 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-11-07 15:58:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-07 23:58:42 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11792" align="alignleft" width="482"] NREL senior scientist Joseph Luther and Dr. Erin Sanehira.[/caption] A collaboration between researchers at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering (UW EE) and the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) yields a new world efficiency record for quantum dot solar cells at 13.4 percent. Quantum dots are incredibly small electronic materials. Ranging from 3 to 20 nanometers in size, they are about one million times smaller than a raindrop.  Because of their size, they possess advantageous optical properties. These properties make them valuable for photovoltaic use, or the process of converting light to electricity (i.e. material used in solar panels). Researchers have been looking at quantum dots as a source of solar cells for nearly three decades. Their goal has centered around the concept of solar cell efficiency, which refers to the portion of energy in the form of sunlight that can be converted into electricity via photovoltaics. The initial quantum dot solar cells had an efficiency of 2.9 percent. Over the years, researchers have expanded this efficiency to 12 percent through a better understanding of the connectivity between individual quantum dots, better overall device structures and through the reduction of defects in lead sulfide quantum dots. [caption id="attachment_2299" align="alignright" width="197"] Professor Lih Lin[/caption] In a recent article, entitled "Enhanced mobility CsPbI3 quantum dot arrays for record-efficiency, high-voltage photovoltaic cells," researchers reached a new record of 13.4 percent. The article, which was published in the October 17th issue of Science Advances, details the reason behind the higher efficiency. The latest advancement in quantum dot solar cells utilizes a new material - cesium lead triiodide (CsPbI3). CsPbI3 produces an exceptionally large voltage at open circuit, meaning that is allows a higher portion of sunlight to reach lower layers when paired with the material's bandgap. Voltage and the material's bandgap are two important factors when achieving higher efficiency in a multijunction solar cell. Multijunction solar cells use different semiconductor materials, which interface between multiple p-n junctions. In the latest advancement, CsPbI3 can be paired with cheap thin-film perovskite materials. The multijunction approach is often used for space applications, where high efficiency is more critical than the cost to make a solar module. The research team's new finding can achieve a similar high efficiency as demonstrated for space solar cells. Built at lower costs than silicon technology, they are ideal for both terrestrial and space applications. Former UW EE graduate student Erin Sanehira (Ph.D. '17) received a NASA fellowship to work on the research while a student at UW EE. She is first author on the paper. Her advisor, Professor Lih Lin is a Co-PI on the work. For Sanehira, the work expands the potential applications for quantum dot solar cells - from Earth to space. “Often, the materials used in space and rooftop applications are totally different," Sanehira said in a recent article. "It is exciting to see possible configurations that could be used for both situations.” Additional authors on the work include NREL researchers Ashley Marshall, Jeffrey Christians, Steven Harvey, Peter Ciesielski, Lance Wheeler, Philip Schulz, Matthew Beard and Co-PI Joseph Luther. The NREL research was funded as part of the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP) an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences with the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. [post_title] => Researchers achieve quantum dot solar cell world record [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-achieve-quantum-dot-solar-cell-world-record [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-08 13:20:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-08 21:20:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11790 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11702 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-11-03 16:06:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-03 23:06:07 [post_content] =>
[caption id="attachment_11704" align="alignleft" width="162" class="left none "] David Younger[/caption] [caption id="attachment_11705" align="alignleft" width="154" class="left none "] Stephanie Berger[/caption] [caption id="attachment_11706" align="alignleft" width="158" class="left none "] David Baker[/caption] [caption id="attachment_2315" align="alignleft" width="181" class="left none "]Eric Klavins Eric Klavins[/caption]
When developing new drug treatments for disease, researchers look to yeast. With its rapid cell cycle and the ease with which its genes can be tweaked, yeast is a flexible tool used to test how a particular drug, chemical or enzyme affects unicellular organisms (e.g. bacteria). Like human cells, yeast has a eukaryotic structure (nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria). It also shares many genes with human cells; yeast cells can be used to investigate how a particular drug affects a certain human gene. Although it identifies whether a new drug binds to what it's supposed to, it does not offer insight into whether the drug binds to anything else in human cells. For example, researchers can screen a new cancer drug for potentially dangerous interactions (e.g. unexpected cell death) prior to clinical trials. However, they can only look at these off-target interactions one at a time. A new paper by University of Washington (UW) electrical engineers and biochemists retools yeast's mating habits, so researchers can test hundreds of drugs against thousands of potential targets. The paper, entitled "High-throughput characterization of protein-protein interactions by reprogramming yeast mating," identifies how researchers used flourescent genetic markers to track yeast's natural mating types and subsequently build new "sexes" for yeast to bind to. The blue and red fluorescent markers that dot the yeast's cell surface indicate whether the microorganism has been mated (purple) or unmated (blue and red). The team played around with numerous proteins and recorded their interactions. Through tracking the mating efficiency, researchers could tell how strongly any two protein molecules interact. They then built new sexes based on the strongest protein interactions. The team put the results to the test. For the emerging cancer drug XCD07, researchers were able to identify the versions of the drug that only bound to the intended target. The researchers' goal is to share the tool for large-scale scientific research. The team has given the engineered yeast strains to several institutions, including Yale University, Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). For lead author David Younger, a UW electrical engineering postdoctoral researcher, he wants the research to enable a “comprehensive preclinical drug screening, rather than the current practice of screening a very small subset of possible off-target interactions.” Additional authors on the paper include UW biochemistry postdoctoral fellow Stephanie Berger, UW biochemistry Professor David Baker and UW electrical engineering Professor Eric Klavins.

---

More News:   [post_title] => Researchers reprogram yeast mating habits for the future of medicine [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-reprogram-yeast-mating-habits-for-the-future-of-medicine [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-03 16:25:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-03 23:25:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11702 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11696 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-11-02 14:56:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-02 21:56:36 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11697" align="alignleft" width="505"] Dr. Michael Khbeis was named the new director of the NNCI WNF.[/caption] On October 24, 2017, The University of Washington National Nanotechnology Coordinated Structure (NNCI) Washington Nanofabrication Facility (WNF)  officially opened the doors of its remodeled facility - a 15,000 square-foot space that offers an open-access cleanroom and expert resources to users. The environment further enhances the shared discovery and dissemination of new technologies focused on nanotechnology and fabrication processes. The WNF took over the space at the university's Fluke Hall in 2011.  Since then, the organization embarked on a nearly six-year, $37 million remodel project. The space began as an unrated cleanroom that was hindered  by failing infrastructure. The remodel transformed the space into a ISO Class 5/6 cleanroom facility that boasts a robust infrastructure with redundant systems. During the renovation, the WNF also added several new capital instruments that expand the nanoscale fabrication and characterization capabilities that are offered. At the October ceremony, UW Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering Professor Karl Böhringer announced that then associate director of the WNF, Michael Khbeis, would become the new director. For Khbeis, the future of the WNF is exciting. "Since taking over the lab in 2011, WNF experienced an operational transformation that led to about a 300 percent growth in utilization and revenue," Khbeis said. "There has been substantial growth from industrial clients that helped make the facility fiscally viable. While we expect continued growth of industrial users, now that construction is complete, we are hoping to focus our attention to fostering increased utilization by UW and other academic and government users. We are working with NanoEngineered Systems (NanoES) Institute (as well as the Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute [MolES] and the Clean Energy Institute [CEI]) to help find and apply for new research programs that will leverage the amazing capabilities being offered at WNF. We hope to engage in more education and outreach initiatives and attract UW students to career paths in nanoscale fabrication and characterization to meet the needs of a wide variety of industries."   [post_title] => UW NNCI WNF celebrates completion of $37M remodel project [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-nnci-wnf-celebrates-completion-of-37m-relaunch-project [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-02 14:58:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-02 21:58:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11696 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11660 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-10-30 11:44:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-30 18:44:22 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11661" align="alignleft" width="476"] From Left: Mechanical Engineering (ME) Chair Per Reinhall, ME Professor Eric Seibel, ME Professor Martin Berg and Electrical Engineering Professor Howard Chizeck.[/caption] Drs. Ivan Yeoh, Per Reinhall, Martin Berg, Howard Chizeck and Eric Seibel received the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control (JDSMC) Rudolf Kalman Best Paper Award for their paper "Electromechanical Modeling and Adaptive Feedforward Control of a Self-Sensing Scanning Fiber Endoscope." [caption id="attachment_11662" align="alignright" width="196"] Dr. Ivan Yeoh[/caption] The paper presents the first online-adaptive control strategy for the scanning fiber endoscope (SFE). The SFE was developed at the University of Washington (UW) Human Photonics Laboratory. It further advances current endoscopes (small cameras that are primarily used in medical diagnoses by physicians) by enhancing high-quality laser-based imaging technology. It uses an ultrathin and flexible endoscope, allowing physicians to circumnavigate difficult to reach internal tissues. The authors' adaptive feedforward control strategy helps anchor SFE, showing marked improvements in scan accuracy over previous control methods and operating environment adaptability. The Rudolf Kalman Best Paper Award is given annually by the Dynamic Systems and Control Division of ASME to the authors of the best paper published in the ASME JDSMC during the preceding year. Yeoh received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at the UW. Professor Reinhall is chair of the UW Department of Mechanical Engineering. Professor Howard Chizeck is a faculty member in electrical engineering. Professors Berg and Seibel are faculty in mechanical engineering. [post_title] => Researchers receive ASME JDSMC Kalman Best Paper Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-receive-asme-jdsmc-kalman-best-paper-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-30 11:45:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-30 18:45:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11660 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11644 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-10-23 11:24:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-23 18:24:33 [post_content] => [post_title] => WNF supports the development of flexible 'skin' for robots [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => wnf-supports-the-development-of-flexible-skin-for-robots [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-23 11:24:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-23 18:24:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11644 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11800 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-11-13 15:12:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-13 23:12:21 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2304" align="alignleft" width="176"] Professor Joshua Smith[/caption] UW Professor of Electrical Engineering and Allen School Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Joshua Smith discusses our future in a world of technology - complete connectivity through the Internet. According to Smith, the Internet of Things (IoT) is already transforming the way we communicate with the world around us, from implantable devices that monitor our health to parking spaces that light up when a space is open. See the complete article here. [post_title] => Professor Smith discusses how the IoT will change our daily lives [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-smith-discusses-how-the-iot-will-change-our-daily-lives [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-13 15:12:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-13 23:12:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11800 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 581 [max_num_pages] => 97 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 0f87fe429e20a1f4e53778b54d8d4588 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
More News
More News Electrical Engineering Kaleidoscope Electrical Engineering eNews