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Faculty receive Ubicomp's 10-Year Impact Award

UW professors, including Electrical Engineering Professors Shwetak Patel and Matt Reynolds, have been recognized at Ubicomp 2017 for the influential paper they wrote in 2007.

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Faculty receive Ubicomp's 10-Year Impact Award Banner

Wireless communications expert Robert Heath leads this year’s Dean W. Lytle Lecture

As a part of the 2017 Lytle Lecture, University of Texas at Austin Professor Robert Heath will explore mmWave communication as an incubator for the rebirth of wireless communications.

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Wireless communications expert Robert Heath leads this year’s Dean W. Lytle Lecture Banner

Researchers achieve groundbreaking communication of low-power devices over long distances

The engineers demonstrated for the first time that devices that operate at almost zero power can transmit data up to nearly two miles, breaking all previously-established barriers.

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Researchers achieve groundbreaking communication of low-power devices over long distances Banner

New hire, Brian Johnson, brings expertise in power electronics

This spring, Dr. Johnson will will advance UW EE's research in power and energy systems by introducing new courses and research in power electronics.

Learn More

New hire, Brian Johnson, brings expertise in power electronics Banner

An MoU between IITH and the UW build a partnership on cyber physical systems, smart cities

A partnership between IITH and UW ECE offers immense opportunities to develop this research for future impact - from India to the United States, with thousands of cities in between.

Learn More

An MoU between IITH and the UW build a partnership on cyber physical systems, smart cities Banner

Professor Sumit Roy receives Best Paper at 2017 WNS3 Workshop

UW EE's quiet but consistent work on ns-3 has garnered a top paper award for Professor Sumit Roy and co-authors.

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Professor Sumit Roy receives Best Paper at 2017 WNS3 Workshop Banner

News + Awards

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/faculty-receive-ubicomps-10-year-impact-award/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/wireless-communications-expert-robert-heath-leads-this-years-dean-w-lytle-lecture/
http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/09/13/uw-team-shatters-long-range-communication-barrier-for-devices-that-consume-almost-no-power/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/new-hire-brian-johnson-brings-expertise-in-power-electronics/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/an-mou-between-iith-and-the-uw-build-a-partnership-on-cyber-physical-systems-smart-cities/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/sumit-roy-2017-wns3-best-paper/
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11384" align="alignleft" width="360"] From left: Gregory Abowd, Julie Kientz, Shwetak Patel, and Award Chair Judy Kay.[/caption]

UW professors have been awarded the 10-Year Impact Award at Ubicomp 2017 for their paper "At the Flick of a Switch: Detecting and Classifying Unique Electrical Events on the Residential Power Line."

UW faculty include Electrical Engineering and Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering Professors Shwetak Patel and Matt Reynolds and Human Centered Design & Engineering Professor Julie Kentz. Additional authors include Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Professor Gregory Bowd and research scientist Thomas Robertson.

The 10-Year Impact Award recognizes research that has made a lasting impact in the field. In 2007, the authors' published work received the Best Paper Award and Best Presentation Award at Ubicomp.

The paper illustrates a novel approach for detecting energy activity within the home using a single plug-in sensor. The authors apply machine learning techniques to enable the system to accurately differentiate between different electrical events, such as turning on a specific light switch or operating certain appliances.

[caption id="attachment_2292" align="alignright" width="179"] Professor Matt Reynolds[/caption]

This work has been instrumental in the development of a new field of research in high-frequency energy disaggregation and infrastructure mediated sensing. It has also led to the creation of Zensi, a startup spun out of Georgia Tech and UW that was acquired by Belkin in 2010. Home energy monitoring and automation have become an industry focus based on the techniques first described in this paper.

When the paper was written, Patel and Kientz were Ph.D. students, and Reynolds was a senior research scientist at Georgia Tech. Ten years later, their work has not only influenced their current research, but it offers a touchstone for other researchers around the world.
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11374" align="alignleft" width="200"] Professor Robert Heath[/caption]

Wedged between microwave and infrared waves on the spectrum are millimeter waves (mmWaves). These tiny wavelengths are about the size of a pencil point. However, mmWaves are packed with high bandwidth channels, leading to limitless opportunities for high-speed broadband applications.

For several years, researchers have discussed the possibility of using mmWave to usher in a new age of mobile wireless communications – 5G. MmWave networks are different than those at conventional frequencies, due to different propagation characteristics and hardware limitations. However, as research grows and technology improves, 5G becomes a very real possibility, and the value of mmWaves expands to other wireless applications.

As a part of the 2017 Dean W. Lytle Lecture, University of Texas at Austin Cullen Trust for Higher Education Endowed Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Robert Heath will explore mmWave communication as an incubator for the rebirth of wireless communications.

“Millimeter wave imaging enables larger bandwidth, which leads to higher data rates,” Prof. Heath said. “This makes anything you want to do with wireless happen faster, from faster file downloads to quicker web browsing. Using the potential of mmWave offers vast opportunities in the future; it has exceptional potential for factory automation and automated driving applications.”

Currently, there is limited deployment of mmWave communications for consumer applications. Prof. Heath’s research group is investigating many potential opportunities of mmWave. Although the applications may sound like a narrative from a sci-fi novel, according to Prof. Heath, mmWave can enable a future of self-driving cars and enhanced drone communication.

“Providing wireless to a car is different than to a person,” Prof. Heath explained. “Challenges exist, but the potential is great; cars can drive more efficiently and avoid accidents. My research group is investigating mmWave communication for aerial vehicles, such as drones, making them operate with more intelligence.”

The use of mmWave as a tool for wireless communication is not a new concept; wireless communications to satellites has existed for many years. However, inserting mmWave in ground and aerial vehicular operations prompts new possibilities for the field.

“Applying this communication to aerial and ground vehicles for consumer use is new and exciting,” Prof. Heath said. “For me, it is a fascinating challenge to take what we’re investigating on the ground and bring it to the air.”

Prof. Heath will give a free public talk entitled “Millimeter Wave Communication: From Origins to Disruptive Applications” on Monday, Oct. 2, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Hub North Ballroom.

The lecture will also be livestreamed and will be available for later viewing on UW EE’s YouTube channel.

Among numerous awards, Prof. Heath is a recipient of the 2016 IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award, the 2017 Marconi Prize Paper Award, and he was a 2003 Frontiers in Education New Faculty Fellow.

The Lytle Lecture honors the late Professor Dean W. Lytle, who began his career as an assistant professor in 1958 in the UW Department of Electrical Engineering. Professor Lytle’s teaching, research and high-impact consulting reached from communications, networks and probability to signal processing.
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11314" align="alignleft" width="230"] Dr. Brian Johnson. Photo by Dennis Schroeder. [/caption]

This spring, Dr. Brian Johnson will advance the UW Department of Electrical Engineering’s (UW EE) research in power and energy systems by introducing new courses and research in power electronics.

Dr. Johnson currently works at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) Power Systems Engineering Center. His research at NREL focuses on bridging advances in contemporary controls with power electronics and power systems. These are research themes he intends to bring to the UW this spring.

“I envision a diverse research portfolio that entails strong theoretical and experimental components,” Dr. Johnson said. “Over the years, I have formed several collaborations with staff at NREL, the DOE [Department of Energy], as well as several companies and universities. As part of my plans moving forward, my aim is to continue building on these relationships and forge an innovative research group that addresses fundamental challenges in energy conversion and grid integration of renewable energy.”

Renewable energy and energy conversion are strong focuses of Dr. Johnson’s research. In 2015, he received a 3-year, $3.8 million grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop distributed inverter controllers, which enable reliable control of low-inertia power systems. This research supports the development of future of power systems driven by sustainable energy resources.

Dr. Johnson’s research portfolio also includes a recent grant from NREL’s R&D Program to advance next-generation renewable system architectures. In this project, he applies advances in wide-bandgap devices to produce medium voltage power electronics circuits that are scalable in both architecture and control.

As a researcher with unique and impactful contributions to the field of power and energy systems, Dr. Johnson will bring new dynamism to the department’s research. Dr. Johnson and UW EE’s shared vision for innovation brings exceptional promise to the future of power electronics.

“During my campus visits, I got the clear impression that UW's EE department is an intellectually dynamic place that truly places value on innovation and scholarly contributions,” Dr. Johnson said. “There is a great opportunity for me to make a unique contribution within the Power and Energy Systems area by introducing new courses and research on power electronics.”
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11310" align="alignleft" width="530"] From left: Dean Michael Bragg, Dr. Uday Desai, Vice-Provost Jeff Reidinger and Professor Sumit Roy.[/caption]

Although the India Institute of Technology - Hyderabad (IITH) and the University  of Washington (UW) are over 7,700 miles away, research interests draw the two institutions closer together.

In May, IITH and the UW Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (UW ECE) joined forces through a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), fostering a partnership on Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) and Smart Cities.As Director of the India Institute of Technology - Hyderabad (IITH), Dr. Uday Desai has a passion for education and research. In particular, his research focuses on Smart Cities, cyber security and Internet of Things (IoT) for smart health care.

Past collaborations and experience in the field drew him to UW ECE as a potential collaborator. Within the last few years, UW ECE has elevated its strong smart cities reseearch through a new collaboration with the Cities of Seattle and Nashville and a new center on smart, connected communities. UW researchers as a collective are partnering more than ever before on making urban spaces less congested and more eco-friendly.

A new UW-housed collective, Urban@UW, works with scholars, policymakers and community stakeholders to develop cross-disciplinary and cross-sector collaborative research. As a hub for innovation and as a space betrothed by urban conditions, Seattle is a hotbed for this research.

However, it’s not just Seattle that is honing in on this research. Cities in India are innovating around technology and data-collection in ways that will be important for learning and developing best practices and implementation, as well.

A partnership between IITH and UW ECE offers immense opportunities to develop this research for future impact - from India to the United States, with thousands of cities in between.

By offering opportunities in smart city research and urban scholarship, this collaboration builds student experience and student commitment to societal issues.  When equipped with the top researchers and educators, the future of cities looks bright.

[post_title] => An MoU between IITH and the UW build a partnership on cyber physical systems, smart cities [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => an-mou-between-iith-and-the-uw-build-a-partnership-on-cyber-physical-systems-smart-cities [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-11 15:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-11 22:43:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11309 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11292 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-07 11:23:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-07 18:23:27 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11291" align="alignleft" width="300"] Sumit Roy, professor of electrical engineering, is a wireless communications/networking expert who has been a long-term contributor to the ns-3 project.[/caption] The paper, entitled “Link-to-System Mapping for ns-3 Wi-Fi OFDM Error Models,” was awarded the top paper prize at the annual WNS3 Workshop. The paper investigates Wi-Fi OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) performance over AWGN (additive white Gaussian noise) and fading channels, developing an ns-3 ErrorRateModel based on tables compiled from link simulation results. This research allows others to reproduce and extend the basic tables for future implementation. This is a reflection of quiet, but consistent work at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering (UW EE) on ns-3, including core simulator architecture as well as new and refined user modules. Authors on the paper include lead author Rohan Patidar, UW EE Professor Sumit Roy, UW EE Affiliate Professor Thomas Henderson and Amrutha Chandramohan. [post_title] => Professor Sumit Roy receives Best Paper at 2017 WNS3 Workshop [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sumit-roy-2017-wns3-best-paper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-07 11:25:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-07 18:25:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11292 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => view-block [1] => block--spotlight-robust-news ) [_finalHTML:protected] =>
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/faculty-receive-ubicomps-10-year-impact-award/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/wireless-communications-expert-robert-heath-leads-this-years-dean-w-lytle-lecture/
http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/09/13/uw-team-shatters-long-range-communication-barrier-for-devices-that-consume-almost-no-power/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/new-hire-brian-johnson-brings-expertise-in-power-electronics/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/an-mou-between-iith-and-the-uw-build-a-partnership-on-cyber-physical-systems-smart-cities/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/sumit-roy-2017-wns3-best-paper/
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UW faculty include Electrical Engineering and Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering Professors Shwetak Patel and Matt Reynolds and Human Centered Design & Engineering Professor Julie Kentz. Additional authors include Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Professor Gregory Bowd and research scientist Thomas Robertson. The 10-Year Impact Award recognizes research that has made a lasting impact in the field. In 2007, the authors' published work received the Best Paper Award and Best Presentation Award at Ubicomp. The paper illustrates a novel approach for detecting energy activity within the home using a single plug-in sensor. The authors apply machine learning techniques to enable the system to accurately differentiate between different electrical events, such as turning on a specific light switch or operating certain appliances. [caption id="attachment_2292" align="alignright" width="179"] Professor Matt Reynolds[/caption] This work has been instrumental in the development of a new field of research in high-frequency energy disaggregation and infrastructure mediated sensing. It has also led to the creation of Zensi, a startup spun out of Georgia Tech and UW that was acquired by Belkin in 2010. Home energy monitoring and automation have become an industry focus based on the techniques first described in this paper. When the paper was written, Patel and Kientz were Ph.D. students, and Reynolds was a senior research scientist at Georgia Tech. Ten years later, their work has not only influenced their current research, but it offers a touchstone for other researchers around the world. [post_title] => Faculty receive Ubicomp's 10-Year Impact Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => faculty-receive-ubicomps-10-year-impact-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-18 11:42:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-18 18:42:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11378 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11367 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-15 11:21:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-15 18:21:45 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11374" align="alignleft" width="200"] Professor Robert Heath[/caption] Wedged between microwave and infrared waves on the spectrum are millimeter waves (mmWaves). These tiny wavelengths are about the size of a pencil point. However, mmWaves are packed with high bandwidth channels, leading to limitless opportunities for high-speed broadband applications. For several years, researchers have discussed the possibility of using mmWave to usher in a new age of mobile wireless communications – 5G. MmWave networks are different than those at conventional frequencies, due to different propagation characteristics and hardware limitations. However, as research grows and technology improves, 5G becomes a very real possibility, and the value of mmWaves expands to other wireless applications. As a part of the 2017 Dean W. Lytle Lecture, University of Texas at Austin Cullen Trust for Higher Education Endowed Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Robert Heath will explore mmWave communication as an incubator for the rebirth of wireless communications. “Millimeter wave imaging enables larger bandwidth, which leads to higher data rates,” Prof. Heath said. “This makes anything you want to do with wireless happen faster, from faster file downloads to quicker web browsing. Using the potential of mmWave offers vast opportunities in the future; it has exceptional potential for factory automation and automated driving applications.” Currently, there is limited deployment of mmWave communications for consumer applications. Prof. Heath’s research group is investigating many potential opportunities of mmWave. Although the applications may sound like a narrative from a sci-fi novel, according to Prof. Heath, mmWave can enable a future of self-driving cars and enhanced drone communication. “Providing wireless to a car is different than to a person,” Prof. Heath explained. “Challenges exist, but the potential is great; cars can drive more efficiently and avoid accidents. My research group is investigating mmWave communication for aerial vehicles, such as drones, making them operate with more intelligence.” The use of mmWave as a tool for wireless communication is not a new concept; wireless communications to satellites has existed for many years. However, inserting mmWave in ground and aerial vehicular operations prompts new possibilities for the field. “Applying this communication to aerial and ground vehicles for consumer use is new and exciting,” Prof. Heath said. “For me, it is a fascinating challenge to take what we’re investigating on the ground and bring it to the air.” Prof. Heath will give a free public talk entitled “Millimeter Wave Communication: From Origins to Disruptive Applications” on Monday, Oct. 2, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Hub North Ballroom. The lecture will also be livestreamed and will be available for later viewing on UW EE’s YouTube channel. Among numerous awards, Prof. Heath is a recipient of the 2016 IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award, the 2017 Marconi Prize Paper Award, and he was a 2003 Frontiers in Education New Faculty Fellow. The Lytle Lecture honors the late Professor Dean W. Lytle, who began his career as an assistant professor in 1958 in the UW Department of Electrical Engineering. Professor Lytle’s teaching, research and high-impact consulting reached from communications, networks and probability to signal processing. [post_title] => Wireless communications expert Robert Heath leads this year’s Dean W. Lytle Lecture [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => wireless-communications-expert-robert-heath-leads-this-years-dean-w-lytle-lecture [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-15 11:21:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-15 18:21:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11367 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11317 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-13 14:55:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-13 21:55:51 [post_content] => [post_title] => Researchers achieve groundbreaking communication of low-power devices over long distances [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-achieve-groundbreaking-communication-of-low-power-devices-over-long-distances [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-13 14:55:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-13 21:55:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11317 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11313 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-12 11:09:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-12 18:09:56 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11314" align="alignleft" width="230"] Dr. Brian Johnson. Photo by Dennis Schroeder. [/caption] This spring, Dr. Brian Johnson will advance the UW Department of Electrical Engineering’s (UW EE) research in power and energy systems by introducing new courses and research in power electronics. Dr. Johnson currently works at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) Power Systems Engineering Center. His research at NREL focuses on bridging advances in contemporary controls with power electronics and power systems. These are research themes he intends to bring to the UW this spring. “I envision a diverse research portfolio that entails strong theoretical and experimental components,” Dr. Johnson said. “Over the years, I have formed several collaborations with staff at NREL, the DOE [Department of Energy], as well as several companies and universities. As part of my plans moving forward, my aim is to continue building on these relationships and forge an innovative research group that addresses fundamental challenges in energy conversion and grid integration of renewable energy.” Renewable energy and energy conversion are strong focuses of Dr. Johnson’s research. In 2015, he received a 3-year, $3.8 million grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop distributed inverter controllers, which enable reliable control of low-inertia power systems. This research supports the development of future of power systems driven by sustainable energy resources. Dr. Johnson’s research portfolio also includes a recent grant from NREL’s R&D Program to advance next-generation renewable system architectures. In this project, he applies advances in wide-bandgap devices to produce medium voltage power electronics circuits that are scalable in both architecture and control. As a researcher with unique and impactful contributions to the field of power and energy systems, Dr. Johnson will bring new dynamism to the department’s research. Dr. Johnson and UW EE’s shared vision for innovation brings exceptional promise to the future of power electronics. “During my campus visits, I got the clear impression that UW's EE department is an intellectually dynamic place that truly places value on innovation and scholarly contributions,” Dr. Johnson said. “There is a great opportunity for me to make a unique contribution within the Power and Energy Systems area by introducing new courses and research on power electronics.” [post_title] => New hire, Brian Johnson, brings expertise in power electronics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => new-hire-brian-johnson-brings-expertise-in-power-electronics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-12 11:09:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-12 18:09:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11313 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11309 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-11 15:43:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-11 22:43:21 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11310" align="alignleft" width="530"] From left: Dean Michael Bragg, Dr. Uday Desai, Vice-Provost Jeff Reidinger and Professor Sumit Roy.[/caption]

Although the India Institute of Technology - Hyderabad (IITH) and the University  of Washington (UW) are over 7,700 miles away, research interests draw the two institutions closer together.

In May, IITH and the UW Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (UW ECE) joined forces through a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), fostering a partnership on Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) and Smart Cities.As Director of the India Institute of Technology - Hyderabad (IITH), Dr. Uday Desai has a passion for education and research. In particular, his research focuses on Smart Cities, cyber security and Internet of Things (IoT) for smart health care.

Past collaborations and experience in the field drew him to UW ECE as a potential collaborator. Within the last few years, UW ECE has elevated its strong smart cities reseearch through a new collaboration with the Cities of Seattle and Nashville and a new center on smart, connected communities. UW researchers as a collective are partnering more than ever before on making urban spaces less congested and more eco-friendly.

A new UW-housed collective, Urban@UW, works with scholars, policymakers and community stakeholders to develop cross-disciplinary and cross-sector collaborative research. As a hub for innovation and as a space betrothed by urban conditions, Seattle is a hotbed for this research.

However, it’s not just Seattle that is honing in on this research. Cities in India are innovating around technology and data-collection in ways that will be important for learning and developing best practices and implementation, as well.

A partnership between IITH and UW ECE offers immense opportunities to develop this research for future impact - from India to the United States, with thousands of cities in between.

By offering opportunities in smart city research and urban scholarship, this collaboration builds student experience and student commitment to societal issues.  When equipped with the top researchers and educators, the future of cities looks bright.

[post_title] => An MoU between IITH and the UW build a partnership on cyber physical systems, smart cities [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => an-mou-between-iith-and-the-uw-build-a-partnership-on-cyber-physical-systems-smart-cities [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-11 15:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-11 22:43:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11309 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11292 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-07 11:23:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-07 18:23:27 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11291" align="alignleft" width="300"] Sumit Roy, professor of electrical engineering, is a wireless communications/networking expert who has been a long-term contributor to the ns-3 project.[/caption] The paper, entitled “Link-to-System Mapping for ns-3 Wi-Fi OFDM Error Models,” was awarded the top paper prize at the annual WNS3 Workshop. The paper investigates Wi-Fi OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) performance over AWGN (additive white Gaussian noise) and fading channels, developing an ns-3 ErrorRateModel based on tables compiled from link simulation results. This research allows others to reproduce and extend the basic tables for future implementation. This is a reflection of quiet, but consistent work at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering (UW EE) on ns-3, including core simulator architecture as well as new and refined user modules. Authors on the paper include lead author Rohan Patidar, UW EE Professor Sumit Roy, UW EE Affiliate Professor Thomas Henderson and Amrutha Chandramohan. [post_title] => Professor Sumit Roy receives Best Paper at 2017 WNS3 Workshop [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sumit-roy-2017-wns3-best-paper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-07 11:25:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-07 18:25:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11292 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11378 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-18 11:42:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-18 18:42:41 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11384" align="alignleft" width="360"] From left: Gregory Abowd, Julie Kientz, Shwetak Patel, and Award Chair Judy Kay.[/caption] UW professors have been awarded the 10-Year Impact Award at Ubicomp 2017 for their paper "At the Flick of a Switch: Detecting and Classifying Unique Electrical Events on the Residential Power Line." UW faculty include Electrical Engineering and Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering Professors Shwetak Patel and Matt Reynolds and Human Centered Design & Engineering Professor Julie Kentz. Additional authors include Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) Professor Gregory Bowd and research scientist Thomas Robertson. The 10-Year Impact Award recognizes research that has made a lasting impact in the field. In 2007, the authors' published work received the Best Paper Award and Best Presentation Award at Ubicomp. The paper illustrates a novel approach for detecting energy activity within the home using a single plug-in sensor. The authors apply machine learning techniques to enable the system to accurately differentiate between different electrical events, such as turning on a specific light switch or operating certain appliances. [caption id="attachment_2292" align="alignright" width="179"] Professor Matt Reynolds[/caption] This work has been instrumental in the development of a new field of research in high-frequency energy disaggregation and infrastructure mediated sensing. It has also led to the creation of Zensi, a startup spun out of Georgia Tech and UW that was acquired by Belkin in 2010. Home energy monitoring and automation have become an industry focus based on the techniques first described in this paper. When the paper was written, Patel and Kientz were Ph.D. students, and Reynolds was a senior research scientist at Georgia Tech. Ten years later, their work has not only influenced their current research, but it offers a touchstone for other researchers around the world. [post_title] => Faculty receive Ubicomp's 10-Year Impact Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => faculty-receive-ubicomps-10-year-impact-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-18 11:42:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-18 18:42:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11378 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 565 [max_num_pages] => 95 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 0f87fe429e20a1f4e53778b54d8d4588 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
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