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UW researchers build largest circuits to date in living eukaryotic cells

The research, led by Professor Eric Klavins, was published on May 25 in Nature Communications.

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UW researchers build largest circuits to date in living eukaryotic cells Banner

UW students take first at PRCCDC

The annual Pacific Rim Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition challenges the students’ ability to analyze security threats and devise defensive strategies in response.

Learn More

UW students take first at PRCCDC Banner

Startup OneRadio unveils radio receiver platform

OneRadio, founded by Professor John Sahr and Affiliate Professor Tony Goodson, showcased its unique wideband radio receiver platform.

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Startup OneRadio unveils radio receiver platform Banner

Energizing EcoCAR

Engineering students are dedicated to the multi-year, multi-phase challenge to convert a Chevrolet Camaro into a hybrid-electric car.

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Energizing EcoCAR Banner

Dr. Babak Parviz receives U-M Bicentennial Alumni Award

Affiliate Professor Babak Parviz received the prestigious honor from his alma mater The University of Michigan for his significant achievements in technology.

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Dr. Babak Parviz receives U-M Bicentennial Alumni Award Banner

Researchers deliver the future in optical display through freeform optics

Assistant Professor Arka Majumdar and his team have developed visible frequency freeform optical elements by leveraging metasurfaces. This advancement can transform optical use.

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Researchers deliver the future in optical display through freeform optics Banner

News + Awards

http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/05/25/uw-scientists-borrow-from-electronics-to-build-largest-circuits-to-date-in-living-eukaryotic-cells/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/uw-students-take-first-at-prccdc/
UW students take first at PRCCDC

UW students take first at PRCCDC

The annual Pacific Rim Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition challenges the students’ ability to analyze security threats and devise defensive strategies in response.

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/startup-oneradio-unveils-radio-receiver-platform/
https://www.me.washington.edu/news/vip_and_ecocar
Energizing EcoCAR

Energizing EcoCAR

Engineering students are dedicated to the multi-year, multi-phase challenge to convert a Chevrolet Camaro into a hybrid-electric car.

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/dr-babak-parviz-receives-u-m-bicentennial-alumni-award/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-deliver-the-future-in-optical-display-through-freeform-optics/
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10686" align="alignnone" width="428"] Team Hillarious[/caption]

By: Tommy Merth

Team Hillarious, comprised entirely of UW Seattle students, took first place in the annual Pacific Rim Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (PRCCDC). This competition challenges the students’ ability to analyze security threats and devise defensive strategies in response. 

Out of the 14 teams competing, Team Hillarious was the only group to successfully protect their network from the hackers. An Electrical Engineering undergraduate student, Philip White, was extensively involved in the team’s success.

In addition to bringing home the PRCCDC trophy, Team Hillarious advanced to the national competition in San Antonio, TX. While they did not place, Team Hillarious represented UW as one of the premier cyber-security teams in the nation. 

Congratulations Philip and Team Hillarious!
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_1278" align="alignleft" width="168"] Professor John Sahr[/caption]

OneRadio, founded by Professor John Sahr and Affiliate Professor Tony Goodson, demonstrated its wideband radio receiver platform at last week's IEEE Radar Conference in Seattle.

The startup was developed by Sahr and Goodson to create a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions simultaneously. The technology combines hardware advances with software applications to allow users to perform many functions at once via software applications.

The OneRadio utilizes a patent-pending, digitally based method to pick up signals across a wide stretch of frequencies and a wide range of signal strength.

“We have the capability of seeing extremely weak signals in the presence of strong signals,”OneRadio CEO Mohan Vaghul said in a recent article.

OneRadio is designed to do what high-end wideband receivers cannot do and at a tenth of the price. Although high-end receivers can identify weak signals, OneRadio can access signals across a wider bandwidth.

“The long-term potential is pretty phenomenal,” Vaghul said in the article.

For aerospace and defense purposes, one receiver could be used in place of several narrower-band receivers. The OneRadio system could monitor for malicious activities in the telecom and security fields. At last week’s conference, OneRadio conducted live demonstrations of wideband RF operations.

The first-generation platform spans 2.5 GHz of bandwidth. However, the company is making strides in the development of a 7 GHz bandwidth.

The development of this product comes from years of research at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering. Support for OneRadio originated from the UW's CoMotion Innovation Fund. CoMotion is dedicated to expanding the economic and societal reach of the UW community by helping innovators achieve the greatest impact from their discoveries.

“CoMotion is pleased to have worked with this team over the past two years to help commercialize this complex technology by working with them on licensing, patent filings, marketing and business development,” said Vikram Jandhyala, executive director of CoMotion and UW’s vice president for innovation strategy, in the article.

---

Information for this release was adapted from a recent article in GeekWire.

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---

Information for this article was gathered from a recent University of Michigan news release.

[post_title] => Dr. Babak Parviz receives U-M Bicentennial Alumni Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-babak-parviz-receives-u-m-bicentennial-alumni-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-12 14:50:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-12 21:50:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10641 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10613 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-05-10 10:06:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-10 17:06:10 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10619" align="alignleft" width="510"]From left: Arka Majumdar, Alan Zhan and Shane Colburn From left: Arka Majumdar, Alan Zhan and Shane Colburn[/caption] A near-eye display is a device that brings a visual display as close to you as headphones bring sound. A well-known recent example is Google’s smart glasses, Google Glass. A small, lightweight near-eye display would be of great use for these mobile devices or in industries such as medicine and aerospace, where there exist stringent size and weight constraints. The potential applications of compact optical systems have driven interest in freeform optics. Traditional optics, such as a lens, relies on the shape of its surface and its volume to bend light. However, it is difficult to manufacture the sharp curvatures and complex forms utilized in freeform optics using existing technologies. To solve this problem, UW Electrical Engineering (EE) and Physics Assistant Professor Arka Majumdar and his group have developed visible frequency freeform optical elements by leveraging nano-patterned surfaces, known as metasurfaces. These planar metasurfaces mimic the curved surfaces in traditional optics and induce spatially varying changes in phase with an ultrathin and flat form factor, enabling cheap and simple fabrication of freeform elements. The work comes from Majumdar’s paper “Metasurface Freeform Nanophotonics,” which was recently published in Scientific Reports. The researchers demonstrated metasurfaces with a cubic phase profile, demonstrating extended depth of focus and focal-tunable lenses. This work clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of metasurface technology to build ultra-thin freeform optical elements. The technology developed by Majumdar’s group is inspired by earlier work in diffractive optics, where spatial phase shifts were achieved by varying the thickness of the device. Majumdar’s group took a slightly different approach — they use sub-wavelength structures, which allow for multiple phase-shifts by only changing the lateral geometry. This enables a flat component, which is easier to manufacture. “Not only do these structures eliminate the need for multiple stage lithography, the sub-wavelength nature allows us to fabricate spatial profiles with large phase gradients,” lead author and UW physics graduate student Alan Zhan said. “Realizing large phase gradients opens the possibility of building monolithic optical systems, like electronic integrated circuits.” [caption id="attachment_10615" align="alignright" width="540"]figure_ms_press_release Figure: The scanning electron micrograph of the fabricated cubic metasurfaces[/caption] These metasurface freeform elements being developed by Majumdar and his group could enable complex optical systems, encompassing uses from vision-correcting eyewear to multi-focal augmented reality visors to implantable microscopes, all while maintaining an ultra-compact form-factor. “The two fields metasurface and freeform optics are led by two disconnected groups of scientists, and our approach will open up more opportunities for dialogue and cooperation between these two fields," Majumdar said. “Our current focus is on integrating these elements into existing systems. By incorporating them with optical systems, they’ll be able to demonstrate imaging. A next step would be integrating them with solid-state mirrors, so they’ll be able to develop monolithic optical systems.” Co-authors on the paper are EE graduate student Shane Colburn and postdoctoral scholar Dr. Chris Dodson. The research is funded in part by an Intel Early Career Award and Amazon Catalyst. 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http://www.washington.edu/news/2017/05/25/uw-scientists-borrow-from-electronics-to-build-largest-circuits-to-date-in-living-eukaryotic-cells/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/uw-students-take-first-at-prccdc/
UW students take first at PRCCDC

UW students take first at PRCCDC

The annual Pacific Rim Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition challenges the students’ ability to analyze security threats and devise defensive strategies in response.

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/startup-oneradio-unveils-radio-receiver-platform/
https://www.me.washington.edu/news/vip_and_ecocar
Energizing EcoCAR

Energizing EcoCAR

Engineering students are dedicated to the multi-year, multi-phase challenge to convert a Chevrolet Camaro into a hybrid-electric car.

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/dr-babak-parviz-receives-u-m-bicentennial-alumni-award/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/researchers-deliver-the-future-in-optical-display-through-freeform-optics/
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This competition challenges the students’ ability to analyze security threats and devise defensive strategies in response. Out of the 14 teams competing, Team Hillarious was the only group to successfully protect their network from the hackers. An Electrical Engineering undergraduate student, Philip White, was extensively involved in the team’s success. In addition to bringing home the PRCCDC trophy, Team Hillarious advanced to the national competition in San Antonio, TX. While they did not place, Team Hillarious represented UW as one of the premier cyber-security teams in the nation. Congratulations Philip and Team Hillarious! 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The startup was developed by Sahr and Goodson to create a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions simultaneously. The technology combines hardware advances with software applications to allow users to perform many functions at once via software applications. The OneRadio utilizes a patent-pending, digitally based method to pick up signals across a wide stretch of frequencies and a wide range of signal strength. “We have the capability of seeing extremely weak signals in the presence of strong signals,”OneRadio CEO Mohan Vaghul said in a recent article. OneRadio is designed to do what high-end wideband receivers cannot do and at a tenth of the price. Although high-end receivers can identify weak signals, OneRadio can access signals across a wider bandwidth. “The long-term potential is pretty phenomenal,” Vaghul said in the article. For aerospace and defense purposes, one receiver could be used in place of several narrower-band receivers. The OneRadio system could monitor for malicious activities in the telecom and security fields. At last week’s conference, OneRadio conducted live demonstrations of wideband RF operations. The first-generation platform spans 2.5 GHz of bandwidth. However, the company is making strides in the development of a 7 GHz bandwidth. The development of this product comes from years of research at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering. Support for OneRadio originated from the UW's CoMotion Innovation Fund. CoMotion is dedicated to expanding the economic and societal reach of the UW community by helping innovators achieve the greatest impact from their discoveries. “CoMotion is pleased to have worked with this team over the past two years to help commercialize this complex technology by working with them on licensing, patent filings, marketing and business development,” said Vikram Jandhyala, executive director of CoMotion and UW’s vice president for innovation strategy, in the article.

---

Information for this release was adapted from a recent article in GeekWire.

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Information for this article was gathered from a recent University of Michigan news release.

[post_title] => Dr. Babak Parviz receives U-M Bicentennial Alumni Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-babak-parviz-receives-u-m-bicentennial-alumni-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-12 14:50:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-12 21:50:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10641 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10613 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-05-10 10:06:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-10 17:06:10 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10619" align="alignleft" width="510"]From left: Arka Majumdar, Alan Zhan and Shane Colburn From left: Arka Majumdar, Alan Zhan and Shane Colburn[/caption] A near-eye display is a device that brings a visual display as close to you as headphones bring sound. A well-known recent example is Google’s smart glasses, Google Glass. A small, lightweight near-eye display would be of great use for these mobile devices or in industries such as medicine and aerospace, where there exist stringent size and weight constraints. The potential applications of compact optical systems have driven interest in freeform optics. Traditional optics, such as a lens, relies on the shape of its surface and its volume to bend light. However, it is difficult to manufacture the sharp curvatures and complex forms utilized in freeform optics using existing technologies. To solve this problem, UW Electrical Engineering (EE) and Physics Assistant Professor Arka Majumdar and his group have developed visible frequency freeform optical elements by leveraging nano-patterned surfaces, known as metasurfaces. These planar metasurfaces mimic the curved surfaces in traditional optics and induce spatially varying changes in phase with an ultrathin and flat form factor, enabling cheap and simple fabrication of freeform elements. The work comes from Majumdar’s paper “Metasurface Freeform Nanophotonics,” which was recently published in Scientific Reports. The researchers demonstrated metasurfaces with a cubic phase profile, demonstrating extended depth of focus and focal-tunable lenses. This work clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of metasurface technology to build ultra-thin freeform optical elements. The technology developed by Majumdar’s group is inspired by earlier work in diffractive optics, where spatial phase shifts were achieved by varying the thickness of the device. Majumdar’s group took a slightly different approach — they use sub-wavelength structures, which allow for multiple phase-shifts by only changing the lateral geometry. This enables a flat component, which is easier to manufacture. “Not only do these structures eliminate the need for multiple stage lithography, the sub-wavelength nature allows us to fabricate spatial profiles with large phase gradients,” lead author and UW physics graduate student Alan Zhan said. “Realizing large phase gradients opens the possibility of building monolithic optical systems, like electronic integrated circuits.” [caption id="attachment_10615" align="alignright" width="540"]figure_ms_press_release Figure: The scanning electron micrograph of the fabricated cubic metasurfaces[/caption] These metasurface freeform elements being developed by Majumdar and his group could enable complex optical systems, encompassing uses from vision-correcting eyewear to multi-focal augmented reality visors to implantable microscopes, all while maintaining an ultra-compact form-factor. “The two fields metasurface and freeform optics are led by two disconnected groups of scientists, and our approach will open up more opportunities for dialogue and cooperation between these two fields," Majumdar said. “Our current focus is on integrating these elements into existing systems. By incorporating them with optical systems, they’ll be able to demonstrate imaging. A next step would be integrating them with solid-state mirrors, so they’ll be able to develop monolithic optical systems.” Co-authors on the paper are EE graduate student Shane Colburn and postdoctoral scholar Dr. Chris Dodson. The research is funded in part by an Intel Early Career Award and Amazon Catalyst. [post_title] => Researchers deliver the future in optical display through freeform optics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-deliver-the-future-in-optical-display-through-freeform-optics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-10 13:26:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-10 20:26:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10613 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10692 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-05-25 16:50:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-25 23:50:09 [post_content] => [post_title] => UW researchers build largest circuits to date in living eukaryotic cells [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-researchers-build-largest-circuits-to-date-in-living-eukaryotic-cells [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-25 17:02:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-26 00:02:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10692 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 528 [max_num_pages] => 88 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 0f87fe429e20a1f4e53778b54d8d4588 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
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