Skip to main content

Eve A. Riskin

  • Professor
  • Associate Dean of Diversity & Access, College of Engineering

Eve Riskin is Associate Dean of Diversity and Access in the College of Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Faculty Director of the ADVANCE Center for Institutional Change. With ADVANCE, she works on mentoring and leadership development programs for women faculty in STEM.  She is principal investigator of the successful NSF-funded STARS program at UW.  She was awarded a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, a Sloan Research Fellowship, the 2006 WEPAN University Change Agent award, the 2006 Hewlett-Packard Harriett B. Rigas Award and the 2007 University of Washington David B. Thorud Leadership Award.

Research Interests

Video compression, human-computer interaction, higher education and diversity in STEM.

3uweeViewNews Object
(
    [_showAnnouncements:protected] => 
    [_showTitle:protected] => 
    [showMore] => 
    [_type:protected] => spotlight
    [_from:protected] => person
    [_args:protected] => Array
        (
            [post_type] => spotlight
            [date_query] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [after] => Array
                                (
                                    [year] => 2015
                                    [month] => 11
                                    [day] => 18
                                )

                        )

                )

            [meta_query] => Array
                (
                    [relation] => AND
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [key] => type
                            [value] => news
                            [compare] => LIKE
                        )

                    [1] => Array
                        (
                            [key] => subjects
                            [value] => "889"
                            [compare] => LIKE
                        )

                )

            [posts_per_page] => 6
            [post_status] => publish
        )

    [_jids:protected] => 
    [_taxa:protected] => Array
        (
        )

    [_meta:protected] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [key] => type
                    [value] => news
                    [compare] => LIKE
                )

            [1] => Array
                (
                    [key] => subjects
                    [value] => "889"
                    [compare] => LIKE
                )

        )

    [_metarelation:protected] => AND
    [_results:protected] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 10241
                    [post_author] => 12
                    [post_date] => 2017-03-29 11:34:32
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-29 18:34:32
                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2314" align="alignleft" width="238"]Riskin_Eve__1457645578_128.95.215.177 Professor Eve Riskin[/caption]

Associate Dean of Diversity and Access and Professor Eve Riskin was a featured speaker at last month’s “Advancing Women in STEM” seminar at Starbucks.

The seminar, which addressed challenges and solutions for Women in STEM studies (science, technology, engineering and math), was held at Starbucks’ headquarters. The event was hosted by the Starbucks Women’s Development Network (WDN).

“I really appreciate Starbucks’ commitment to supporting different affinity groups including women, African-Americans and LGBTQ people, just like we do at the UW,” Riskin said in an article published by the UW. “The future for women in STEM professions is very bright because companies everywhere understand the benefits of having a more diverse workforce.”

The WDN presents opportunities for Starbucks employees to engage in the work of diversity, inclusion and accessibility with community partners.Through these networks, partners with shared interests in areas such as race, gender, accessibility and sexual orientation address serious issues and celebrate special achievements. Riskin and other faculty and students at the UW are a part of this partnership. 

Starbucks presented the month-long series in honor of Women's History Month, focusing on industries where women have historically faced barriers to advancement, including business and the military.

“Companies are realizing that they need to change how they do business to ensure that all groups — not just majority males — have successful careers or they will lose out on important talent,” Riskin said in the article.

[post_title] => Professor Eve Riskin Talks Women and STEM at Starbucks Seminar [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-eve-riskin-talks-women-and-stem-at-starbucks-seminar [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-30 17:55:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-31 00:55:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10241 [menu_order] => 77 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7914 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2016-10-24 14:54:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-24 21:54:53 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2314" align="alignleft" width="225"]Professor Eve Riskin leads the Redshirt efforts across six universities. Professor Eve Riskin leads the Redshirt efforts across six universities.[/caption] Electrical Engineering Professor and Associate Dean of Diversity and Access Eve Riskin received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant to support incoming freshmen who are interested in pursuing an engineering degree and who are from economically and educationally underserved backgrounds. The consortium is an extension of the STARS (Washington STate Academic RedShirt) program. Research has found that increasing first and second-year retention enhances the ability of academically talented, low-income students to successfully graduate with engineering degrees. The Redshirt in Engineering Consortium follows a model practiced in college sports. For “Redshirt” athletes, an individual sits out for a year, developing the competitive skills for gameplay. Similarly, Riskin’s “Redshirt” model focuses on priming first-year college students for a future of academic success through an extra year of preparation. It consists of intrusive academic advising, an innovative first-year academic curriculum, community building, and career awareness. Results for the STARS program in the first three years have been impressive – 80 percent of STARS students have entered engineering departments, and STARS students have significantly outperformed the overall student body in Math 124, Math 125 and Chemistry 142.  “I learned of the original Redshirt at the University of Colorado through College of Engineering Director Scott Winter,” Riskin said. “We [UW and WSU] contacted Professor Jacquelyn Sullivan at CU-Boulder, and she and her team offered to coach the UW and WSU teams on building their own Redshirt programs.” The Consortium grant, entitled “Collaborative Research: The Redshirt in Engineering Consortium,” is a multi-university project. Six universities will replicate and test a model originally developed at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The model is designed to increase the retention and success of low-income students from underserved populations. There will be 800 scholarships awarded among the partnering institutions. The University of Washington leads the Consortium. Other members include: the University of Colorado, Boulder; Washington State University; Boise State University; the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and the University of California, San Diego. “We visited CU-Boulder in September to observe their program and facilities,” Riskin said. “Their goal is to have 100 Redshirt programs in the United States. We are excited to work with them to spread the Redshirt model – I truly believe ‘redshirting’ is the way to support underserved students in engineering. It is waste of talent to not provide opportunities in engineering to students just because they come from less privileged backgrounds.” More News: [post_title] => Riskin Leads "Redshirt" Consortium to Support Low-Income Students in Engineering [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => riskin-leads-redshirt-consortium-to-support-low-income-students-in-engineering [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-10 15:57:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-10 23:57:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=7914 [menu_order] => 131 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 767 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-02-20 20:41:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-20 20:41:29 [post_content] => Eve RiskinIn a new study, women scientists and engineers who successfully transitioned from industry careers to university faculty were interviewed to learn more about their experience with a new approach to recruiting women in academia, called “on-ramping.” Rather than the current practice of recruiting women from other universities, “on-ramping” strategies may increase the entire pool of women in academia. The paper, co-authored by EE Professor and Associate Dean for Diversity and Access Eve Riskin, gathered insight from 10 females with Ph.D.'s in engineering who were interested in transitioning from careers in industry to academia. The interviewees all participated in workshops called “On-Ramps into Academia” held during a four-year time span, which offered a new approach to increasing women in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. The two-day workshops provided women who were interested in a career move into academia with practical tools and support including the job application, interview process, funding and advice for how to be successful during the first years in academia. Attendees also had an opportunity to network with speakers and their cohorts. See Also: [post_title] => Eve Riskin Studies New Way to Recruit Women Faculty [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => eve-riskin-studies-new-way-to-recruit-women-faculty [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-22 22:16:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-22 22:16:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=767 [menu_order] => 941 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => block--spotlight-tiles ) [_finalHTML:protected] => [_postID:protected] => 889 [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) [_block:protected] => [_db:protected] => WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [post_type] => spotlight [date_query] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [after] => Array ( [year] => 2015 [month] => 11 [day] => 18 ) ) ) [meta_query] => Array ( [relation] => AND [0] => Array ( [key] => type [value] => news [compare] => LIKE ) [1] => Array ( [key] => subjects [value] => "889" [compare] => LIKE ) ) [posts_per_page] => 6 [post_status] => publish ) [query_vars] => Array ( [post_type] => spotlight [date_query] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [after] => Array ( [year] => 2015 [month] => 11 [day] => 18 ) ) ) [meta_query] => Array ( [relation] => AND [0] => Array ( [key] => type [value] => news [compare] => LIKE ) [1] => Array ( [key] => subjects [value] => "889" [compare] => LIKE ) ) [posts_per_page] => 6 [post_status] => publish [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [static] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [orderby] => menu_order [order] => ASC [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => ) [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [queried_terms] => Array ( ) [primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID ) [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [key] => type [value] => news [compare] => LIKE ) [1] => Array ( [key] => subjects [value] => "889" [compare] => LIKE ) [relation] => AND ) [relation] => AND [meta_table] => wp_postmeta [meta_id_column] => post_id [primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_postmeta [1] => mt1 ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( [wp_postmeta] => Array ( [key] => type [value] => news [compare] => LIKE [alias] => wp_postmeta [cast] => CHAR ) [mt1] => Array ( [key] => subjects [value] => "889" [compare] => LIKE [alias] => mt1 [cast] => CHAR ) ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => WP_Date_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [after] => Array ( [year] => 2015 [month] => 11 [day] => 18 ) [column] => post_date [compare] => = [relation] => AND ) [column] => post_date [compare] => = [relation] => AND ) [relation] => AND [column] => wp_posts.post_date [compare] => = [time_keys] => Array ( [0] => after [1] => before [2] => year [3] => month [4] => monthnum [5] => week [6] => w [7] => dayofyear [8] => day [9] => dayofweek [10] => dayofweek_iso [11] => hour [12] => minute [13] => second ) ) [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts INNER JOIN wp_postmeta ON ( wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id ) INNER JOIN wp_postmeta AS mt1 ON ( wp_posts.ID = mt1.post_id ) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.post_date > '2015-11-18 23:59:59' ) AND ( ( wp_postmeta.meta_key = 'type' AND wp_postmeta.meta_value LIKE '%news%' ) AND ( mt1.meta_key = 'subjects' AND mt1.meta_value LIKE '%\"889\"%' ) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'spotlight' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.menu_order ASC LIMIT 0, 6 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10241 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-29 11:34:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-29 18:34:32 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2314" align="alignleft" width="238"]Riskin_Eve__1457645578_128.95.215.177 Professor Eve Riskin[/caption]

Associate Dean of Diversity and Access and Professor Eve Riskin was a featured speaker at last month’s “Advancing Women in STEM” seminar at Starbucks.

The seminar, which addressed challenges and solutions for Women in STEM studies (science, technology, engineering and math), was held at Starbucks’ headquarters. The event was hosted by the Starbucks Women’s Development Network (WDN).

“I really appreciate Starbucks’ commitment to supporting different affinity groups including women, African-Americans and LGBTQ people, just like we do at the UW,” Riskin said in an article published by the UW. “The future for women in STEM professions is very bright because companies everywhere understand the benefits of having a more diverse workforce.”

The WDN presents opportunities for Starbucks employees to engage in the work of diversity, inclusion and accessibility with community partners.Through these networks, partners with shared interests in areas such as race, gender, accessibility and sexual orientation address serious issues and celebrate special achievements. Riskin and other faculty and students at the UW are a part of this partnership. 

Starbucks presented the month-long series in honor of Women's History Month, focusing on industries where women have historically faced barriers to advancement, including business and the military.

“Companies are realizing that they need to change how they do business to ensure that all groups — not just majority males — have successful careers or they will lose out on important talent,” Riskin said in the article.

[post_title] => Professor Eve Riskin Talks Women and STEM at Starbucks Seminar [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-eve-riskin-talks-women-and-stem-at-starbucks-seminar [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-30 17:55:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-31 00:55:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10241 [menu_order] => 77 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7914 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2016-10-24 14:54:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-24 21:54:53 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2314" align="alignleft" width="225"]Professor Eve Riskin leads the Redshirt efforts across six universities. Professor Eve Riskin leads the Redshirt efforts across six universities.[/caption] Electrical Engineering Professor and Associate Dean of Diversity and Access Eve Riskin received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant to support incoming freshmen who are interested in pursuing an engineering degree and who are from economically and educationally underserved backgrounds. The consortium is an extension of the STARS (Washington STate Academic RedShirt) program. Research has found that increasing first and second-year retention enhances the ability of academically talented, low-income students to successfully graduate with engineering degrees. The Redshirt in Engineering Consortium follows a model practiced in college sports. For “Redshirt” athletes, an individual sits out for a year, developing the competitive skills for gameplay. Similarly, Riskin’s “Redshirt” model focuses on priming first-year college students for a future of academic success through an extra year of preparation. It consists of intrusive academic advising, an innovative first-year academic curriculum, community building, and career awareness. Results for the STARS program in the first three years have been impressive – 80 percent of STARS students have entered engineering departments, and STARS students have significantly outperformed the overall student body in Math 124, Math 125 and Chemistry 142.  “I learned of the original Redshirt at the University of Colorado through College of Engineering Director Scott Winter,” Riskin said. “We [UW and WSU] contacted Professor Jacquelyn Sullivan at CU-Boulder, and she and her team offered to coach the UW and WSU teams on building their own Redshirt programs.” The Consortium grant, entitled “Collaborative Research: The Redshirt in Engineering Consortium,” is a multi-university project. Six universities will replicate and test a model originally developed at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The model is designed to increase the retention and success of low-income students from underserved populations. There will be 800 scholarships awarded among the partnering institutions. The University of Washington leads the Consortium. Other members include: the University of Colorado, Boulder; Washington State University; Boise State University; the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and the University of California, San Diego. “We visited CU-Boulder in September to observe their program and facilities,” Riskin said. “Their goal is to have 100 Redshirt programs in the United States. We are excited to work with them to spread the Redshirt model – I truly believe ‘redshirting’ is the way to support underserved students in engineering. It is waste of talent to not provide opportunities in engineering to students just because they come from less privileged backgrounds.” More News: [post_title] => Riskin Leads "Redshirt" Consortium to Support Low-Income Students in Engineering [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => riskin-leads-redshirt-consortium-to-support-low-income-students-in-engineering [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-10 15:57:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-10 23:57:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=7914 [menu_order] => 131 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 767 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-02-20 20:41:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-20 20:41:29 [post_content] => Eve RiskinIn a new study, women scientists and engineers who successfully transitioned from industry careers to university faculty were interviewed to learn more about their experience with a new approach to recruiting women in academia, called “on-ramping.” Rather than the current practice of recruiting women from other universities, “on-ramping” strategies may increase the entire pool of women in academia. The paper, co-authored by EE Professor and Associate Dean for Diversity and Access Eve Riskin, gathered insight from 10 females with Ph.D.'s in engineering who were interested in transitioning from careers in industry to academia. The interviewees all participated in workshops called “On-Ramps into Academia” held during a four-year time span, which offered a new approach to increasing women in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. The two-day workshops provided women who were interested in a career move into academia with practical tools and support including the job application, interview process, funding and advice for how to be successful during the first years in academia. Attendees also had an opportunity to network with speakers and their cohorts. See Also: [post_title] => Eve Riskin Studies New Way to Recruit Women Faculty [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => eve-riskin-studies-new-way-to-recruit-women-faculty [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-22 22:16:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-22 22:16:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=767 [menu_order] => 941 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 3 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10241 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-29 11:34:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-29 18:34:32 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2314" align="alignleft" width="238"]Riskin_Eve__1457645578_128.95.215.177 Professor Eve Riskin[/caption]

Associate Dean of Diversity and Access and Professor Eve Riskin was a featured speaker at last month’s “Advancing Women in STEM” seminar at Starbucks.

The seminar, which addressed challenges and solutions for Women in STEM studies (science, technology, engineering and math), was held at Starbucks’ headquarters. The event was hosted by the Starbucks Women’s Development Network (WDN).

“I really appreciate Starbucks’ commitment to supporting different affinity groups including women, African-Americans and LGBTQ people, just like we do at the UW,” Riskin said in an article published by the UW. “The future for women in STEM professions is very bright because companies everywhere understand the benefits of having a more diverse workforce.”

The WDN presents opportunities for Starbucks employees to engage in the work of diversity, inclusion and accessibility with community partners.Through these networks, partners with shared interests in areas such as race, gender, accessibility and sexual orientation address serious issues and celebrate special achievements. Riskin and other faculty and students at the UW are a part of this partnership. 

Starbucks presented the month-long series in honor of Women's History Month, focusing on industries where women have historically faced barriers to advancement, including business and the military.

“Companies are realizing that they need to change how they do business to ensure that all groups — not just majority males — have successful careers or they will lose out on important talent,” Riskin said in the article.

[post_title] => Professor Eve Riskin Talks Women and STEM at Starbucks Seminar [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-eve-riskin-talks-women-and-stem-at-starbucks-seminar [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-30 17:55:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-31 00:55:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10241 [menu_order] => 77 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 3 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 5a3b8916d150d65a13b9e9491dd8ea6f [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
 

Representative Publications

  • Coleen Carrigan, Katie O'Leary, Eve Riskin, Joyce Yen, and Matt O'Donnell, ``On-ramping: following women scientists and engineers through their transition from nonacademic to faculty careers,'' The Journal of Technology Transfer, December 2015.
  • J. Kingma, Eve A. Riskin, J. B. Schneider, R. G. Olsen, S. Cunningham, D. Wiggin, K. A. Reinkens, and S. Winter, ``The Washington STate Academic RedShirt (STARS) in Engineering Program.'' Proceedings of ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, June 2014.
  • Jessica J. Tran, Eve A. Riskin, Richard E. Ladner, and Jake O. Wobbrock, ``Evaluating Tradeoffs: Battery Power and Intelligibility of Mobile Sign Language Video Transmitted at Low Frame Rates and Bit Rates,'' ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing, 7(3): 1-26, November 2015.
  • Jessica Tran, Rafael Rodriguez, Eve A. Riskin, and Jacob O. Wobbrock (2013). ``A web-based intelligibility evaluation of sign language video transmitted at low frame rates and bitrates.'' Proceedings of ASSETS 2013. NY: ACM Press.
  • Rahul Vanam, Eve A. Riskin, Richard Ladner, and Sheila Hemami, ``Fast Algorithms for Designing Nearly Optimal Lookup Tables for Complexity Control of the H.264 encoder,'' Signal Image and Video Processing, 7(5), 991-1003, 2013.
  • Coleen Carrigan, Kate Quinn, and Eve Riskin, ``The Gendered Division of Labor Among STEM Faculty and the Effects of Critical Mass,'' Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 4(3), 131-146, September 2011.
Eve A. Riskin Headshot

Associated Labs

Research Areas

Affiliations

Education

  • Ph.D, Electrical Engineering, 1990
    Stanford University
  • MS, Operations Research, 1986
    Stanford University
  • MS, Electrical Engineering, 1985
    Stanford University
  • BS, Electrical Engineering, 1984
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology