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Joshua R. Smith

  • Associate Professor

Appointments

Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering
Associate Professor, Computer Science and Engineering

Biography

Joshua R. Smith is an associate professor of electrical engineering and of computer science and engineering at the University of Washington, where he leads the Sensor Systems Laboratory. He was named an Allen Distinguished Investigator by the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and he is a Thrust Leader in the NSF Engineering Research Center on Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE).  His research focuses on inventing new sensor systems, devising new ways to power them and developing algorithms for using them. This research has applications in the domains of implanted medical devices, robotics, and ubiquitous computing.

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UW EE Professors Les Atlas, Karl Böhringer, Howard Chizeck, Blake Hannaford, Eric Klavins, Arka Majumdar, Shwetak Patel and Joshua Smith were awarded the 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellowship.  In a partnership with the University of Washington, Amazon Catalyst supports bold solutions to world problems. The program provides funding, mentorship and community to the innovative projects.

Congratulations to all newly-minted Amazon Catalyst Fellows!

The Projects:

simsong.org
PI: Les Atlas

Active self-cleaning technology for solar panels
PI: Karl Böhringer

Haptic Passwords
PI: Howard Chizeck

IRA, the robot surgical assistant
PI: Blake Hannaford

UW BIOFAB: A cloud laboratory for genetic engineering
PI: Eric Klavins

Smart Eyewear
PI: Arka Majumdar

OsteoApp
PI: Shwetak Patel

Enabling district shared parking via energy harvesting wireless sensing technology
PI: Joshua Smith
                    [post_title] => 8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows
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                    [post_title] => UW researchers develop world's first battery-free phone
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                    [post_title] => Battery-free cellphone research featured in Wired
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10529" align="alignleft" width="407"]WiBotic CEO Ben Waters (Ph.D. '15) WiBotic CEO Ben Waters (Ph.D. '15)[/caption]

WiBotic, the technology company developing wirelessly-powered drones and robotic devices, has secured $2.5 million. This new funding round will bring the company to a total of $3.25 million in funding. This support will enhance product development and boost sales and marketing.

The company was founded by WiBotic CEO and UW Department of Electrical Engineering (UW EE) alum Ben Waters (Ph.D. '15) and UW EE and UW Allen School Professor Joshua Smith when Waters was a graduate student in the department. WiBotic currently delivers wireless robotics to companies in variety of fields for large-scale societal impact. Even though it is only 2-years-old, the ten-person company has already seen several significant milestones.

WiBotic customers are utilizing the product to deliver medical supplies in developing nations, reduce excess water usage in agriculture, strengthen safe extraction of offshore oil and gas, monitor contamination levels in the ocean and respond to emergency situations more quickly. In November, WiBotic was named a "GeekWire Seattle Top Ten" as one of the most promising new startups in the region. Waters was named a Puget Sound Business Journal "40 Under 40" for his entrepreneurial energy and passion for innovation.

“For two and a half years we have been developing innovative solutions for the robotics industry and I’m excited that several prestigious new investors are joining our team,” said Waters in a recent press release. “We look forward to the expertise and strategic thinking these firms will add to our strong team as we continue to provide critical infrastructure for robotic applications worldwide.”

WiBotic's investment partners include Tsing Capital (the leader of the company's recent investment round), Comet Labs, Digi Labs, and follow-on investors W Fund, WRF Capital and Wisemont Capital.

“The robotics industry has an intense need for the wireless power and battery intelligence solutions that WiBotic has built,” said Michael Li, managing partner of Tsing Capital in the press release. “WiBotic has been gaining strong traction in several industries and we see immense growth potential as the global robotics industry soars.” Tsing Capital is China’s leading fund management company, which is dedicated to sustainable technology  in China and globally.

In addition to the new investment, WiBotic also announced the company's move to a new state-of-the-art engineering and testing facility at the University of Washington’s CoMotion Labs. At the lab's incubator program headquarters, WiBotic will continue to expand upon its core technology in a collaborative research hub.

- - -

Original press release

More News:

[post_title] => Startup WiBotic Raises $2.5M to Charge Drones and Robots Wirelessly [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => startup-wibotic-raises-2-5m-to-charge-drones-and-robots-wirelessly [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-26 16:11:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-26 23:11:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10521 [menu_order] => 38 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10056 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-01 11:57:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-01 19:57:07 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10059" align="alignleft" width="483"]32346370844_7f8758bdd8_k The UW team used conductive thread to sew an antenna into this cotton T-shirt and transmit data to a smartphone via ambient FM radio signals. Credit: University of Washington[/caption]

Imagine you’re waiting in your car and a poster for a concert from a local band catches your eye. What if you could just tune your car to a radio station and actually listen to that band’s music? Or perhaps you see the poster on the side of a bus stop. What if it could send your smartphone a link for discounted tickets or give you directions to the venue?

Going further, imagine you go for a run, and your shirt can sense your perspiration and send data on your vital signs directly to your phone.

A new technique pioneered by University of Washington electrical engineers and computer science engineers makes these “smart” posters and clothing a reality by allowing them to communicate directly with your car’s radio or your smartphone. For instance, bus stop billboards could send digital content about local attractions. A street sign could broadcast the name of an intersection or notice that it is safe to cross a street, improving accessibility for the disabled. In addition, clothing with integrated sensors could monitor vital signs and send them to a phone.

“What we want to do is enable smart cities and fabrics where everyday objects in outdoor environments — whether it’s posters or street signs or even the shirt you’re wearing — can ‘talk’ to you by sending information to your phone or car,” said lead faculty and UW assistant professor of computer science and engineering Shyam Gollakota.

“The challenge is that radio technologies like WiFi, Bluetooth and conventional FM radios would last less than half a day with a coin cell battery when transmitting," said co-author and UW electrical engineering doctoral student Vikram Iyer. "So we developed a new way of communication where we send information by reflecting ambient FM radio signals that are already in the air, which consumes close to zero power.”

The UW team has — for the first time — demonstrated how to apply a technique called “backscattering” to outdoor FM radio signals. The new system transmits messages by reflecting and encoding audio and data in these signals that are ubiquitous in urban environments, without affecting the original radio transmissions. Results are published in a paper to be presented in Boston at the 14th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation in March.

The team demonstrated that a “singing poster” for the band Simply Three placed at a bus stop could transmit a snippet of the band’s music, as well as an advertisement for the band, to a smartphone at a distance of 12 feet or to a car over 60 feet away. They overlaid the audio and data on top of ambient news signals from a local NPR radio station.

“FM radio signals are everywhere. You can listen to music or news in your car and it’s a common way for us to get our information,” said co-author and UW computer science and engineering doctoral student Anran Wang. “So what we do is basically make each of these everyday objects into a mini FM radio station at almost zero power.”

Such ubiquitous low-power connectivity can also enable smart fabric applications such as clothing integrated with sensors to monitor a runner’s gait and vital signs that transmits the information directly to a user’s phone. In a second demonstration, the researchers from the UW Networks & Mobile Systems Lab used conductive thread to sew an antenna into a cotton T-shirt, which was able to use ambient radio signals to transmit data to a smartphone at rates up to 3.2 kilobits per second. 

The system works by taking an everyday FM radio signal broadcast from an urban radio tower. The “smart” poster or T-shirt uses a low-power reflector to manipulate the signal in a way that encodes the desired audio or data on top of the FM broadcast to send a “message” to the smartphone receiver on an unoccupied frequency in the FM radio band.

“Our system doesn’t disturb existing FM radio frequencies,” said co-author Joshua Smith, UW associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and engineering. “We send our messages on an adjacent band that no one is using — so we can piggyback on your favorite news or music channel without disturbing the original transmission.”

The team demonstrated three different methods for sending audio signals and data using FM backscatter: one simply overlays the new information on top of the existing signals, another takes advantage of unused portions of a stereo FM broadcast, and the third uses cooperation between two smartphones to decode the message.

“Because of the unique structure of FM radio signals, multiplying the original signal with the backscattered signal actually produces an additive frequency change,” said co-author Vamsi Talla, a UW EE alum (Ph.D. '16) and a postdoctoral researcher in computer science and engineering. “These frequency changes can be decoded as audio on the normal FM receivers built into cars and smartphones.”

In the team’s demonstrations, the total power consumption of the backscatter system was 11 microwatts, which could be easily supplied by a tiny coin-cell battery for a couple of years, or powered using tiny solar cells.

The research was funded in part by the National Science Foundation and Google Faculty Research Awards.

More News:

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This funding will support the UW-based start-up, Jeeva Wireless. This company seeks to revolutionize the way devices communicate by enabling breakthrough transmission efficiency. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Josh Smith and Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering Shyam Gollakota co-founded the company alongside researchers Vamsi Talla (Ph.D. ’15), Bryce Kellogg (M.S. ’15) and Aaron Parks (M.S. ’15). The company has launched the Passive Wi-Fi system that can generate WiFi transmissions using 10,000 times less power than conventional methods. Low-power options, such as Bluetooth Low Energy and Zigbee, cannot match the system’s energy efficiency. Because of this, the project has landed the UW team in MIT Technology Review’s top-ten list of breakthrough technologies in 2016. Digital vs. analog is the key to increasing efficiency while increasing power. The system uses a single plugged-in device for power-intensive analog functions, such as producing a radio signal at a specific frequency. Other sensors produce the Wi-Fi pockets of information by reflecting and absorbing the signal, using digital switches that require virtually no energy. Prototype sensors could connect with a smartphone, tablet, or other smart device at distances of up to 100 feet. “Our sensors can talk to any router, smartphone, tablet or other electronic device with a Wi-Fi chipset,” said Passive Wi-Fi co-author and electrical engineering doctoral student Bryce Kellogg in a news release. “The cool thing is that all these devices can decode the Wi-Fi packets we created using reflections so you don’t need specialized equipment.” Passive Wi-Fi could open the way for applications that currently require too much power for regular Wi-Fi. For example, other types of communication platforms have been required in the past for smart-home sensor systems that can detect which doors are open, or whether the kids have come home from school. “Even though so many homes already have Wi-Fi, it hasn’t been the best choice for that,” Smith said in the news release on Passive Wi-Fi. “Now that we can achieve Wi-Fi for tens of microwatts of power and can do much better than both Bluetooth and ZigBee, you could now imagine using Wi-Fi for everything.” Additional News: GeekWire   [post_title] => Researchers Raise $1.2M for the Development of Breakthrough Passive Wi-Fi [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-researchers-raise-1-2m-for-the-development-of-breakthrough-passive-wi-fi [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-07 10:58:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-07 18:58:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => 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The program provides funding, mentorship and community to the innovative projects. Congratulations to all newly-minted Amazon Catalyst Fellows! The Projects: simsong.org PI: Les Atlas Active self-cleaning technology for solar panels PI: Karl Böhringer Haptic Passwords PI: Howard Chizeck IRA, the robot surgical assistant PI: Blake Hannaford UW BIOFAB: A cloud laboratory for genetic engineering PI: Eric Klavins Smart Eyewear PI: Arka Majumdar OsteoApp PI: Shwetak Patel Enabling district shared parking via energy harvesting wireless sensing technology PI: Joshua Smith [post_title] => 8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-faculty-named-2017-amazon-catalyst-fellows [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-21 13:33:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-21 20:33:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11006 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10980 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-05 13:32:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-05 20:32:12 [post_content] => [post_title] => UW researchers develop world's first battery-free phone [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-researchers-develop-worlds-first-battery-free-phone [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-05 13:36:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-05 20:36:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10980 [menu_order] => 9 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10934 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-06-28 14:52:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-28 21:52:54 [post_content] => [post_title] => Battery-free cellphone research featured in Wired [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-researchers-develop-battery-free-cellphones [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-05 13:32:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-05 20:32:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10934 [menu_order] => 11 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10521 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-04-26 15:59:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-26 22:59:54 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10529" align="alignleft" width="407"]WiBotic CEO Ben Waters (Ph.D. '15) WiBotic CEO Ben Waters (Ph.D. '15)[/caption] WiBotic, the technology company developing wirelessly-powered drones and robotic devices, has secured $2.5 million. This new funding round will bring the company to a total of $3.25 million in funding. This support will enhance product development and boost sales and marketing. The company was founded by WiBotic CEO and UW Department of Electrical Engineering (UW EE) alum Ben Waters (Ph.D. '15) and UW EE and UW Allen School Professor Joshua Smith when Waters was a graduate student in the department. WiBotic currently delivers wireless robotics to companies in variety of fields for large-scale societal impact. Even though it is only 2-years-old, the ten-person company has already seen several significant milestones. WiBotic customers are utilizing the product to deliver medical supplies in developing nations, reduce excess water usage in agriculture, strengthen safe extraction of offshore oil and gas, monitor contamination levels in the ocean and respond to emergency situations more quickly. In November, WiBotic was named a "GeekWire Seattle Top Ten" as one of the most promising new startups in the region. Waters was named a Puget Sound Business Journal "40 Under 40" for his entrepreneurial energy and passion for innovation. “For two and a half years we have been developing innovative solutions for the robotics industry and I’m excited that several prestigious new investors are joining our team,” said Waters in a recent press release. “We look forward to the expertise and strategic thinking these firms will add to our strong team as we continue to provide critical infrastructure for robotic applications worldwide.” WiBotic's investment partners include Tsing Capital (the leader of the company's recent investment round), Comet Labs, Digi Labs, and follow-on investors W Fund, WRF Capital and Wisemont Capital. “The robotics industry has an intense need for the wireless power and battery intelligence solutions that WiBotic has built,” said Michael Li, managing partner of Tsing Capital in the press release. “WiBotic has been gaining strong traction in several industries and we see immense growth potential as the global robotics industry soars.” Tsing Capital is China’s leading fund management company, which is dedicated to sustainable technology  in China and globally. In addition to the new investment, WiBotic also announced the company's move to a new state-of-the-art engineering and testing facility at the University of Washington’s CoMotion Labs. At the lab's incubator program headquarters, WiBotic will continue to expand upon its core technology in a collaborative research hub.

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Original press release

More News:

[post_title] => Startup WiBotic Raises $2.5M to Charge Drones and Robots Wirelessly [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => startup-wibotic-raises-2-5m-to-charge-drones-and-robots-wirelessly [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-26 16:11:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-26 23:11:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10521 [menu_order] => 38 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10056 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-01 11:57:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-01 19:57:07 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10059" align="alignleft" width="483"]32346370844_7f8758bdd8_k The UW team used conductive thread to sew an antenna into this cotton T-shirt and transmit data to a smartphone via ambient FM radio signals. Credit: University of Washington[/caption]

Imagine you’re waiting in your car and a poster for a concert from a local band catches your eye. What if you could just tune your car to a radio station and actually listen to that band’s music? Or perhaps you see the poster on the side of a bus stop. What if it could send your smartphone a link for discounted tickets or give you directions to the venue?

Going further, imagine you go for a run, and your shirt can sense your perspiration and send data on your vital signs directly to your phone.

A new technique pioneered by University of Washington electrical engineers and computer science engineers makes these “smart” posters and clothing a reality by allowing them to communicate directly with your car’s radio or your smartphone. For instance, bus stop billboards could send digital content about local attractions. A street sign could broadcast the name of an intersection or notice that it is safe to cross a street, improving accessibility for the disabled. In addition, clothing with integrated sensors could monitor vital signs and send them to a phone.

“What we want to do is enable smart cities and fabrics where everyday objects in outdoor environments — whether it’s posters or street signs or even the shirt you’re wearing — can ‘talk’ to you by sending information to your phone or car,” said lead faculty and UW assistant professor of computer science and engineering Shyam Gollakota.

“The challenge is that radio technologies like WiFi, Bluetooth and conventional FM radios would last less than half a day with a coin cell battery when transmitting," said co-author and UW electrical engineering doctoral student Vikram Iyer. "So we developed a new way of communication where we send information by reflecting ambient FM radio signals that are already in the air, which consumes close to zero power.”

The UW team has — for the first time — demonstrated how to apply a technique called “backscattering” to outdoor FM radio signals. The new system transmits messages by reflecting and encoding audio and data in these signals that are ubiquitous in urban environments, without affecting the original radio transmissions. Results are published in a paper to be presented in Boston at the 14th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation in March.

The team demonstrated that a “singing poster” for the band Simply Three placed at a bus stop could transmit a snippet of the band’s music, as well as an advertisement for the band, to a smartphone at a distance of 12 feet or to a car over 60 feet away. They overlaid the audio and data on top of ambient news signals from a local NPR radio station.

“FM radio signals are everywhere. You can listen to music or news in your car and it’s a common way for us to get our information,” said co-author and UW computer science and engineering doctoral student Anran Wang. “So what we do is basically make each of these everyday objects into a mini FM radio station at almost zero power.”

Such ubiquitous low-power connectivity can also enable smart fabric applications such as clothing integrated with sensors to monitor a runner’s gait and vital signs that transmits the information directly to a user’s phone. In a second demonstration, the researchers from the UW Networks & Mobile Systems Lab used conductive thread to sew an antenna into a cotton T-shirt, which was able to use ambient radio signals to transmit data to a smartphone at rates up to 3.2 kilobits per second. 

The system works by taking an everyday FM radio signal broadcast from an urban radio tower. The “smart” poster or T-shirt uses a low-power reflector to manipulate the signal in a way that encodes the desired audio or data on top of the FM broadcast to send a “message” to the smartphone receiver on an unoccupied frequency in the FM radio band.

“Our system doesn’t disturb existing FM radio frequencies,” said co-author Joshua Smith, UW associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and engineering. “We send our messages on an adjacent band that no one is using — so we can piggyback on your favorite news or music channel without disturbing the original transmission.”

The team demonstrated three different methods for sending audio signals and data using FM backscatter: one simply overlays the new information on top of the existing signals, another takes advantage of unused portions of a stereo FM broadcast, and the third uses cooperation between two smartphones to decode the message.

“Because of the unique structure of FM radio signals, multiplying the original signal with the backscattered signal actually produces an additive frequency change,” said co-author Vamsi Talla, a UW EE alum (Ph.D. '16) and a postdoctoral researcher in computer science and engineering. “These frequency changes can be decoded as audio on the normal FM receivers built into cars and smartphones.”

In the team’s demonstrations, the total power consumption of the backscatter system was 11 microwatts, which could be easily supplied by a tiny coin-cell battery for a couple of years, or powered using tiny solar cells.

The research was funded in part by the National Science Foundation and Google Faculty Research Awards.

More News:

[post_title] => UW Researchers Turn Everyday Objects into FM Radio Stations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-researchers-turn-everyday-objects-into-fm-radio-stations [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-13 11:00:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-13 18:00:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10056 [menu_order] => 56 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9801 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-02-01 11:18:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-01 19:18:02 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_9813" align="aligncenter" width="951"]screen-shot-2017-02-01-at-11-25-37-am From left to right: Associate Professor Josh Smith, Assistant Professor of CSE Shyam Gollakota, CSE postdoctoral researcher Vamsi Talla, Ph.D. student Bryce Kellogg and Ph.D. student Aaron Parks[/caption] UW Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering researchers have raised $1.2 million to develop and commercialize a power-efficient way to generate Wi-Fi transmissions. This funding will support the UW-based start-up, Jeeva Wireless. This company seeks to revolutionize the way devices communicate by enabling breakthrough transmission efficiency. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering Josh Smith and Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering Shyam Gollakota co-founded the company alongside researchers Vamsi Talla (Ph.D. ’15), Bryce Kellogg (M.S. ’15) and Aaron Parks (M.S. ’15). The company has launched the Passive Wi-Fi system that can generate WiFi transmissions using 10,000 times less power than conventional methods. Low-power options, such as Bluetooth Low Energy and Zigbee, cannot match the system’s energy efficiency. Because of this, the project has landed the UW team in MIT Technology Review’s top-ten list of breakthrough technologies in 2016. Digital vs. analog is the key to increasing efficiency while increasing power. The system uses a single plugged-in device for power-intensive analog functions, such as producing a radio signal at a specific frequency. Other sensors produce the Wi-Fi pockets of information by reflecting and absorbing the signal, using digital switches that require virtually no energy. Prototype sensors could connect with a smartphone, tablet, or other smart device at distances of up to 100 feet. “Our sensors can talk to any router, smartphone, tablet or other electronic device with a Wi-Fi chipset,” said Passive Wi-Fi co-author and electrical engineering doctoral student Bryce Kellogg in a news release. “The cool thing is that all these devices can decode the Wi-Fi packets we created using reflections so you don’t need specialized equipment.” Passive Wi-Fi could open the way for applications that currently require too much power for regular Wi-Fi. For example, other types of communication platforms have been required in the past for smart-home sensor systems that can detect which doors are open, or whether the kids have come home from school. “Even though so many homes already have Wi-Fi, it hasn’t been the best choice for that,” Smith said in the news release on Passive Wi-Fi. “Now that we can achieve Wi-Fi for tens of microwatts of power and can do much better than both Bluetooth and ZigBee, you could now imagine using Wi-Fi for everything.” Additional News: GeekWire   [post_title] => Researchers Raise $1.2M for the Development of Breakthrough Passive Wi-Fi [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-researchers-raise-1-2m-for-the-development-of-breakthrough-passive-wi-fi [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-07 10:58:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-07 18:58:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=9801 [menu_order] => 66 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11006 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-19 16:14:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-19 23:14:01 [post_content] => UW EE Professors Les Atlas, Karl Böhringer, Howard Chizeck, Blake Hannaford, Eric Klavins, Arka Majumdar, Shwetak Patel and Joshua Smith were awarded the 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellowship.  In a partnership with the University of Washington, Amazon Catalyst supports bold solutions to world problems. The program provides funding, mentorship and community to the innovative projects. Congratulations to all newly-minted Amazon Catalyst Fellows! The Projects: simsong.org PI: Les Atlas Active self-cleaning technology for solar panels PI: Karl Böhringer Haptic Passwords PI: Howard Chizeck IRA, the robot surgical assistant PI: Blake Hannaford UW BIOFAB: A cloud laboratory for genetic engineering PI: Eric Klavins Smart Eyewear PI: Arka Majumdar OsteoApp PI: Shwetak Patel Enabling district shared parking via energy harvesting wireless sensing technology PI: Joshua Smith [post_title] => 8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-faculty-named-2017-amazon-catalyst-fellows [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-21 13:33:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-21 20:33:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11006 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 12 [max_num_pages] => 2 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 48e35ad9963c6d2a891c04e9a38d3c79 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
 

Representative Publications

  • uMonitor: In-situ Energy Monitoring with Microwatt power consumption, Saman Naderiparizi, Aaron N. Parks, Farshid Salemi, Joshua R. Smith.
  • Large Area Wireless Power via a Planar Array of Coupled Resonators, Xingyi Shi, Joshua R. Smith, IEEE IWAT, Feb 2016.
  • Analysis of a Near Field Communication Wireless Power System, Yi Zhao, Brody Mahoney, Joshua R. Smith, IEEE WPTC, 2016.
  • A High-Voltage Compliant Neural Stimulator With HF Wireless Power and UHF Backscatter Communication, Vaishnavi Ranganathan, Brody Mahoney, Eric Pepin, Michael Sunshine, Chet T. Moritz, Jacques C. Rudell, Joshua R. Smith, IEEE WPTC, 2016.
  • Design and Analysis of Rectifying and Regulating Rectifier with PWM and PFM Modes, Vamsi Talla, Joshua R. Smith, IEEE Int'l Symposium on Circuits & Systems (ISCAS), May 2016.
  • Passive Wi-Fi: Bringing Low Power to Wi-Fi Transmissions, Bryce Kellogg, Vamsi Talla, Shyamnath Gollakota, Joshua R. Smith, Usenix Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation (NSDI), 2016.
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Phone206-685-2094
jrs@cs.uw.edu
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556 CSE

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Innovation/Entrepreneurship

Education

  • Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, 1999
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • M.S. Electrical Engineering, 1995
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • M.A. Physics and Theoretical Physics, 1997
    University of Cambridge
  • B.A. Natural Sciences (Physics and Theoretical Physics), 1993
    University of Cambridge
  • B.A. Computer Science, Philosophy, 1991
    Williams College