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Lillian Ratliff

  • Assistant Professor

Lillian Ratliff was a postdoctoral researcher in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley from 2015 to 2016, where she obtained her Ph.D. in 2015.  Her research interests lie at the intersection of game theory, optimization and statistical learning. She applies tools from these domains to address inefficiencies and vulnerabilities in next-generation urban infrastructure systems.  She is the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

Research Interests

Smart urban spaces.

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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2298" align="alignleft" width="245"]Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff[/caption]

[caption id="attachment_10178" align="alignleft" width="260"]UW EE alum and WPI Assistant Professor Andrew Clark UW EE alum and WPI Assistant Professor Andrew Clark[/caption]

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Initiation Initiative (CRII) grant supports faculty early in their careers as a way to establish research independence. Each year, the NSF awards only 25 to 30 grants nationwide. Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff received the grant for her work entitled "Emerging Markets and Myopic Decision-Making in Multi-Modal Transportation Systems: Models and Validation." UW EE alum (Ph.D. '14) and Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Assistant Professor Andrew Clark received a separate NSF CRII grant for his work entitled "Secure-by-Design Synthesis of Cyber-Physical Systems."

Ratliff's work aims to tackle several challenges surrounding future smart cities and traveler mobility. Her team will create high-fidelity models, using real-world data through learning models of mixed-mode travel decisions and emerging mobility markets to identify traveler decision-making.  She will investigate travelers' evaluations of mobility modes, such as risk-sensitivity and models of market structures (an example of this would be ride-sharing platforms). 

If successful, the project will expose areas where municipalities can adjust their management strategies to supplement a multi-modal sharing economy. Through her team's collaboration with the Seattle Department of Transportation and industry partners Swiftly and IDAX, the results have real-world applications. This projects builds on other research Ratliff is conducting in multi-modal transportation. Two recent projects have received the NSF US Ignite Grant and the NSF Early-Concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER). 

The goal of Clark's project is to develop a framework for Cyber-physical systems (CPS) in critical applications, including transportation, health care and energy. Because these properties can be impacted by malicious attacks, which have already been demonstrated on platforms ranging from smart cars to implantable medical devices, this CPS framework must provide verifiable guarantees on properties, such as safety, performance and security. The project aims to formulate passivity-based rules for composing multiple control laws against multi-stage attacks, as well as methods for switching controllers based on the current estimate of the adversary actions. This effort will contribute to the development of CPS that operate safely in the presence of cyber attacks. Algorithms developed in the project will be implemented on mobile platforms in order to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach and ensure successful and timely transition to practice. This work builds on Clark’s Ph.D. research supervised by Research Professor Linda Bushnell and Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran at the University of Washington. [post_title] => Professors Lillian Ratliff and Andrew Clark Receive Competitive NSF CRII Grants [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professors-lillian-ratliff-and-andrew-clark-receive-competitive-nsf-crii-grants [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-16 16:02:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 23:02:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10177 [menu_order] => 54 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7731 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2016-10-17 16:16:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-17 23:16:39 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_7732" align="alignleft" width="377"]lillian-and-baosen EE Assistant Professor Baosen Zhang is PI on the project. EE Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff is Co-PI.[/caption] For urban roadways, traffic-choked streets have become synonymous with the weekday commute. Over the decades, strategic conversations between city officials, engineers and policy makers have sought to lessen congestion and provide increased transportation options. However, as cities continue to develop and populations increase, the results of years of conversation cannot materialize fast enough. On the thrumming streets of Seattle and Nashville, the consumer becomes a key player on urban transportation initiatives. The project, which is a collaboration between the University of Washington, City of Seattle, Vanderbilt University and the City of Nashville, tackles urban transportation congestion by engaging the individual user through the use of smart devices. The three-year, proof-of-concept project has received a collaborative National Science Foundation (NSF) US Ignite Grant. Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Baosen Zhang is the Principal Investigator on the project and Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff is the Co-Principal Investigator. The University of Washington leads the multimodal transit project, collaborating with Vanderbilt University and the Cities of Nashville and Seattle to test the research. Zhang and his team seek to build an overarching solution that balances the needs of multiple parties, including commercial companies, municipal service providers and individuals. The information sharing and computing platform overcomes the incentive gap between municipalities and individuals by offering mixed-mode routing suggestions and other relevant information to travelers. For municipality officials, it relays how users are consuming different transportation resources. “The platform serves as a virtual commons,” Ratliff said. “Individual citizens can directly communicate with service providers. It offers beneficial information to these providers, while offering users a voice.” The project utilizes smart devices due to their proliferation in the urban commuter space. The commuters, therefore, become active agents in a shared economy. Currently available applications for multimodal transport solutions focus on individual users and their local perspectives. This current application does not accurately represent an overall solution. Although there is large-scale data being collected by both municipalities and users, neither group has the resources to develop real-time analytics and controls. The project will develop an architecture and framework to perform on a distributed platform and utilize multiple routes. The researchers will also develop the software to host a social platform capable of delivering relevant data and analytics. The Cities of Seattle and Nashville offer real-world use for testing and implementation. “No one has done this type of collaborating and computing before,” Ratliff said. “It not only focuses on commuters as a whole, but it also looks at two socioeconomically diverse cities – Seattle and Nashville.” Through an additional NSF Grant – the Early-Concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) – Zhang and Ratliff collaborate with the City of Seattle to alleviate parking challenges within the city. This project will address a host of environmental and infrastructure concerns, such as health, the environment and urban development. “Traffic congestions are increasingly becoming bottlenecks to sustainable urban growth as infrastructures are being stretched to their limits,” Zhang said. “Up to 40 percent of all surface level traffic in urban areas stems from drivers looking for parking. This project will develop new parking management tools using algorithms for cities and apps for drivers that allow municipalities to achieve better congestion control and enable drivers to act more efficiently.” The information gathered will provide parking and congestion models to municipalities, allowing the city to achieve better congestion control and enable drivers to act more efficiently. “Transportation is a public good,” Ratliff said. “If this pilot is successful, this will inform how we can engage the citizens more, not just with traffic congestion, but with other transportation and urban initiatives.” These projects are part of the Smart and Connected Communities Initiative of the UW Electrical Engineering Department. The University of Washington is part of the MetroLab Network initiative of the White House. 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[post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2298" align="alignleft" width="245"]Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10178" align="alignleft" width="260"]UW EE alum and WPI Assistant Professor Andrew Clark UW EE alum and WPI Assistant Professor Andrew Clark[/caption] The National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Initiation Initiative (CRII) grant supports faculty early in their careers as a way to establish research independence. Each year, the NSF awards only 25 to 30 grants nationwide. Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff received the grant for her work entitled "Emerging Markets and Myopic Decision-Making in Multi-Modal Transportation Systems: Models and Validation." UW EE alum (Ph.D. '14) and Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Assistant Professor Andrew Clark received a separate NSF CRII grant for his work entitled "Secure-by-Design Synthesis of Cyber-Physical Systems."

Ratliff's work aims to tackle several challenges surrounding future smart cities and traveler mobility. Her team will create high-fidelity models, using real-world data through learning models of mixed-mode travel decisions and emerging mobility markets to identify traveler decision-making.  She will investigate travelers' evaluations of mobility modes, such as risk-sensitivity and models of market structures (an example of this would be ride-sharing platforms). 

If successful, the project will expose areas where municipalities can adjust their management strategies to supplement a multi-modal sharing economy. Through her team's collaboration with the Seattle Department of Transportation and industry partners Swiftly and IDAX, the results have real-world applications. This projects builds on other research Ratliff is conducting in multi-modal transportation. Two recent projects have received the NSF US Ignite Grant and the NSF Early-Concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER). 

The goal of Clark's project is to develop a framework for Cyber-physical systems (CPS) in critical applications, including transportation, health care and energy. Because these properties can be impacted by malicious attacks, which have already been demonstrated on platforms ranging from smart cars to implantable medical devices, this CPS framework must provide verifiable guarantees on properties, such as safety, performance and security. The project aims to formulate passivity-based rules for composing multiple control laws against multi-stage attacks, as well as methods for switching controllers based on the current estimate of the adversary actions. This effort will contribute to the development of CPS that operate safely in the presence of cyber attacks. Algorithms developed in the project will be implemented on mobile platforms in order to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach and ensure successful and timely transition to practice. This work builds on Clark’s Ph.D. research supervised by Research Professor Linda Bushnell and Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran at the University of Washington. [post_title] => Professors Lillian Ratliff and Andrew Clark Receive Competitive NSF CRII Grants [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professors-lillian-ratliff-and-andrew-clark-receive-competitive-nsf-crii-grants [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-16 16:02:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 23:02:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10177 [menu_order] => 54 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7731 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2016-10-17 16:16:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-17 23:16:39 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_7732" align="alignleft" width="377"]lillian-and-baosen EE Assistant Professor Baosen Zhang is PI on the project. EE Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff is Co-PI.[/caption] For urban roadways, traffic-choked streets have become synonymous with the weekday commute. Over the decades, strategic conversations between city officials, engineers and policy makers have sought to lessen congestion and provide increased transportation options. However, as cities continue to develop and populations increase, the results of years of conversation cannot materialize fast enough. On the thrumming streets of Seattle and Nashville, the consumer becomes a key player on urban transportation initiatives. The project, which is a collaboration between the University of Washington, City of Seattle, Vanderbilt University and the City of Nashville, tackles urban transportation congestion by engaging the individual user through the use of smart devices. The three-year, proof-of-concept project has received a collaborative National Science Foundation (NSF) US Ignite Grant. Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Baosen Zhang is the Principal Investigator on the project and Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff is the Co-Principal Investigator. The University of Washington leads the multimodal transit project, collaborating with Vanderbilt University and the Cities of Nashville and Seattle to test the research. Zhang and his team seek to build an overarching solution that balances the needs of multiple parties, including commercial companies, municipal service providers and individuals. The information sharing and computing platform overcomes the incentive gap between municipalities and individuals by offering mixed-mode routing suggestions and other relevant information to travelers. For municipality officials, it relays how users are consuming different transportation resources. “The platform serves as a virtual commons,” Ratliff said. “Individual citizens can directly communicate with service providers. It offers beneficial information to these providers, while offering users a voice.” The project utilizes smart devices due to their proliferation in the urban commuter space. The commuters, therefore, become active agents in a shared economy. Currently available applications for multimodal transport solutions focus on individual users and their local perspectives. This current application does not accurately represent an overall solution. Although there is large-scale data being collected by both municipalities and users, neither group has the resources to develop real-time analytics and controls. The project will develop an architecture and framework to perform on a distributed platform and utilize multiple routes. The researchers will also develop the software to host a social platform capable of delivering relevant data and analytics. The Cities of Seattle and Nashville offer real-world use for testing and implementation. “No one has done this type of collaborating and computing before,” Ratliff said. “It not only focuses on commuters as a whole, but it also looks at two socioeconomically diverse cities – Seattle and Nashville.” Through an additional NSF Grant – the Early-Concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) – Zhang and Ratliff collaborate with the City of Seattle to alleviate parking challenges within the city. This project will address a host of environmental and infrastructure concerns, such as health, the environment and urban development. “Traffic congestions are increasingly becoming bottlenecks to sustainable urban growth as infrastructures are being stretched to their limits,” Zhang said. “Up to 40 percent of all surface level traffic in urban areas stems from drivers looking for parking. This project will develop new parking management tools using algorithms for cities and apps for drivers that allow municipalities to achieve better congestion control and enable drivers to act more efficiently.” The information gathered will provide parking and congestion models to municipalities, allowing the city to achieve better congestion control and enable drivers to act more efficiently. “Transportation is a public good,” Ratliff said. “If this pilot is successful, this will inform how we can engage the citizens more, not just with traffic congestion, but with other transportation and urban initiatives.” These projects are part of the Smart and Connected Communities Initiative of the UW Electrical Engineering Department. The University of Washington is part of the MetroLab Network initiative of the White House. [post_title] => UW EE Faculty to Tackle Urban Mobility [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => electrical-engineering-professors-zhang-and-ratliff-to-develop-novel-multimodal-transportation-project-with-vanderbilt-university-and-the-cities-of-seattle-and-nashville [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-11-02 11:39:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-11-02 18:39:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=7731 [menu_order] => 110 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 2 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10177 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-16 15:57:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-16 22:57:43 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_2298" align="alignleft" width="245"]Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10178" align="alignleft" width="260"]UW EE alum and WPI Assistant Professor Andrew Clark UW EE alum and WPI Assistant Professor Andrew Clark[/caption] The National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Initiation Initiative (CRII) grant supports faculty early in their careers as a way to establish research independence. Each year, the NSF awards only 25 to 30 grants nationwide. Electrical Engineering Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff received the grant for her work entitled "Emerging Markets and Myopic Decision-Making in Multi-Modal Transportation Systems: Models and Validation." UW EE alum (Ph.D. '14) and Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Assistant Professor Andrew Clark received a separate NSF CRII grant for his work entitled "Secure-by-Design Synthesis of Cyber-Physical Systems."

Ratliff's work aims to tackle several challenges surrounding future smart cities and traveler mobility. Her team will create high-fidelity models, using real-world data through learning models of mixed-mode travel decisions and emerging mobility markets to identify traveler decision-making.  She will investigate travelers' evaluations of mobility modes, such as risk-sensitivity and models of market structures (an example of this would be ride-sharing platforms). 

If successful, the project will expose areas where municipalities can adjust their management strategies to supplement a multi-modal sharing economy. Through her team's collaboration with the Seattle Department of Transportation and industry partners Swiftly and IDAX, the results have real-world applications. This projects builds on other research Ratliff is conducting in multi-modal transportation. Two recent projects have received the NSF US Ignite Grant and the NSF Early-Concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER). 

The goal of Clark's project is to develop a framework for Cyber-physical systems (CPS) in critical applications, including transportation, health care and energy. Because these properties can be impacted by malicious attacks, which have already been demonstrated on platforms ranging from smart cars to implantable medical devices, this CPS framework must provide verifiable guarantees on properties, such as safety, performance and security. The project aims to formulate passivity-based rules for composing multiple control laws against multi-stage attacks, as well as methods for switching controllers based on the current estimate of the adversary actions. This effort will contribute to the development of CPS that operate safely in the presence of cyber attacks. Algorithms developed in the project will be implemented on mobile platforms in order to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach and ensure successful and timely transition to practice. This work builds on Clark’s Ph.D. research supervised by Research Professor Linda Bushnell and Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran at the University of Washington. [post_title] => Professors Lillian Ratliff and Andrew Clark Receive Competitive NSF CRII Grants [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professors-lillian-ratliff-and-andrew-clark-receive-competitive-nsf-crii-grants [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-16 16:02:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 23:02:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10177 [menu_order] => 54 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 2 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => f137895587c66f76fccbaa5231e8aeca [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )
 

Representative Publications

  • Ioannis C. Konstantakopoulos, Lillian J. Ratliff, Ming Jin, Costas Spanos, S. Shankar Sastry. Smart Building Energy Efficiency via Social Game: A Robust Utility Learning Framework for Closing–the–Loop. IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, 2016 (under review).
  • Lillian J. Ratliff, Walid Krichene, S. Shankar Sastry. Adaptive Incentive Design Under Adverse Selection. SICON, 2016
  • Ming Jin, Lillian J. Ratliff, Ioannis C. Konstantakopoulos, Costas Spanos, S. Shankar Sastry. REST: A Reliable Estimation and Stopping Time Algorithm for Social Game Experiments. Proceedings of the 6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems, pp. 90–99, 2015.
  • Lillian J. Ratliff, Roy Dong, Henrik Ohlsson, Alvaro A. Cardenas, Shankar Sastry. Privacy and Customer Segmentation in the Smart Grid. Proceedings of the 53rd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, pp. 2136–2141, 2014
  • Lillian J. Ratliff, Samuel A. Burden, Shankar Sastry. Genericity and Structural Stability of Non-degenerate Differential Nash Equilibria. American Control Conference, pp. 3990–3995, 2014.
  • Lillian J. Ratliff, Samuel A. Burden, S. Shankar Sastry. On the Characterization of Local Nash Equilibria in Continuous Games. IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 2016.

Research Areas

Affiliations

Education

  • Ph.D., Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, 2015
    University of California, Berkeley
  • MS, Electrical Engineering, 2010
    University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • BS, Electrical Engineering, 2008
    University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • BS, Mathematics, 2008
    University of Nevada, Las Vegas