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Matt Reynolds

  • Associate Professor
  • Associate Chair for Research and Entrepreneurship

Appointments

Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering
Associate Chair for Research and Entrepreneurship, Electrical Engineering
Associate Professor, Computer Science & Engineering
CoMotion Presidential Innovation Fellow

Biography

Matt Reynolds has a joint appointment as an associate professor in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. He was previously the Nortel Networks Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University. He is also co-founder of the RFID systems firm ThingMagic Inc (acquired by Trimble Navigation), the energy conservation firm Zensi (acquired by Belkin) and the home sensing company SNUPI Inc (acquired by Sears).

Reynolds’ research interests include RFID, energy efficiency at the physical layer of wireless communication and the physics of sensing and actuation. Matt received his Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab in 2003, where he was a Motorola Fellow, as well as S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE, has received five Best Paper awards and has 32 issued and over 45 pending patents.

Research Interests

RFID, ultra-low power sensing and computation, energy harvesting, wireless power transfer (WPT) and smart materials, surfaces and spaces.

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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10784" align="alignleft" width="585"] From left to right: Jose Tomas Arenas, James Rosenthal, Eleftherios Kampianakis, Apoorva Sharma and Professor Matt Reynolds.[/caption]

By: Tommy Merth

At the 11th annual IEEE International Conference on RFID (IEEE RFID), four graduate students in Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering Matt Reynolds’ Lab were honored with the 2017 Best Poster Award. The team, composed of Jose Tomas Arenas, James Rosenthal, Eleftherios Kampianakis and Apoorva Sharma, investigates wireless neural recording and stimulation devices for neuroprosthetics applications. 

Their award winning work, titled “A Dual-Band Wireless Power Transfer and Backscatter Communication Approach for Implantable Neuroprosthetic Devices,” describes their approach to high data transfer rates while reducing power consumption by a factor of 100 over conventional Wi-Fi.

The IEEE RFID conference is the premier conference for exchanging technical research in RFID and allows researchers to share, discuss and witness research results in all areas of RFID technologies and their applications, including energy harvesting, Internet of Things (IoT), localization, and security.

Congratulations to the team!
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_9869" align="aligncenter" width="854"]170131-iv-pano This panoramic image captures the beamed-power setup. Associate Professor Matt Reynolds (far left) stands with Intellectual Ventures’ Wayt Gibbs, Rita Rogers and Russell Hannigan (left to right). Credit: GeekWire Photo / Alan Boyle[/caption]

In the early 1900s, Nikola Tesla envisioned a structure that could deliver power through air, without connectors. The Wardenclyffe Tower, also known as the Tesla Tower, became a lost dream when its investment dwindled. Associate Professor Matt Reynolds and his team at Intellectual Ventures are developing novel approaches to wireless power transmissions that make this power possible and profitable.

The novel approach involves metamaterials. This technology has gained attention by offering real-world legitimacy to Harry Potter’s “invisibility cloak.” Simply, metamaterials are a class of material engineered to produce properties that don’t occur naturally. For wizard enthusiasts, some metamaterials can bend electromagnetic radiation (e.g. light) around an object, giving the appearance that it isn’t there at all.

For Reynolds and his team, these materials allow about 8 watts’ worth of microwaves to be beamed across a lab space, lighting up an array of LED lights by shooting microwaves at a metamaterials-based reflective array. This array is about the size of a chalkboard, allowing the microwaves to focus on their intended target.

The researchers expect to scale up the system to power devices at distances of 160 feet (the width of a football field) or more. By increasing the range, they will be able to apply the technology to drone flight. On average, free-flying drones are limited to 20 minutes of flight time. If you could beam enough power to keep them in the air, they could hover indefinitely. This proves a useful feature for individuals who use drones to monitor security perimeters, inspect infrastructure ranging from railways to cellphone towers or produce aerial video footage.

This past fall, Reynolds and collaborators released new research on the development of a wireless charging hub. The new system involving metamaterials could be adapted to create wall panels capable for home charging. Reynolds said today’s wireless charging systems tend to take advantage of electromagnetic induction, which only works over a short range. An example of this would be an electric toothbrush. The toothbrush sits on a charging stand, which produces a proximal interaction.

“In order to get longer-range wireless power, you need to use fundamentally different physics,” Reynolds said in a recent article.

This fundamentally different physics, ushered in through metamaterials, has distinct advantages over similar wireless power systems, such as laser-beamed power systems or induction stations. The microwave beam can be focused and redirected with relatively high efficiency and with no moving parts.

Currently, the team is looking at high-end and large-scale applications. However, if researchers can operate the system at higher frequencies in the future, that could encourage the development of smaller devices that cost less and are capable of beaming out more power.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0AGs7ZyeWM

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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_7852" align="alignleft" width="370"]EE Associate Professor Matt Reynolds is co-author on the paper.  EE Associate Professor Matt Reynolds is co-author on the paper.[/caption]

A flat-screen panel that resembles a TV on your living room wall could one day remotely charge any device within its line of sight, according to new research.

In a paper published Oct. 23, 2016, on the arXiv pre-print repository, engineers at the University of Washington, Duke University and Intellectual Ventures’ Invention Science Fund (ISF) show that the technology already exists to build such a system — it’s only a matter of taking the time to design it.

"There is an enormous demand for alternatives to today's clunky charging pads and cumbersome cables, which restrict the mobility of a smart phone or a tablet. Our proposed approach takes advantage of widely used LCD technology to seamlessly deliver wireless power to all kinds of smart devices,” said co-author Matt Reynolds, UW associate professor of electrical engineering and of computer science and engineering.

"The ability to safely direct focused beams of microwave energy to charge specific devices, while avoiding unwanted exposure to people, pets and other objects, is a game-changer for wireless power. And we’re looking into alternatives to liquid crystals that could allow energy transfer at much higher power levels over greater distances," Reynolds said.

Some wireless charging systems already exist to help power speakers, cell phones and tablets. These technologies rely on platforms that require their own wires, however, and the devices must be placed in the immediate vicinity of the charging station.

This is because existing chargers use the resonant magnetic near-field to transmit energy. The magnetic field produced by current flowing in a coil of wire can be quite large close to the coil and can be used to induce a similar current in a neighboring coil. Magnetic fields also have the added bonus of being considered safe for human exposure, making them a convenient choice for wireless power transfer.

The magnetic near-field approach is not an option for power transfer over larger distances. This is because the coupling between source and receiver — and thus the power transfer efficiency — drops rapidly with distance. The wireless power transfer system proposed in the new paper operates at much higher microwave frequencies, where the power transfer distance can extend well beyond the confines of a room.

To maintain reasonable levels of power transfer efficiency, the key to the system is to operate in the Fresnel zone — a region of an electromagnetic field that can be focused, allowing power density to reach levels sufficient to charge many devices with high efficiency.

"As long as you’re within a certain distance, you can build antennas that gather electromagnetic energy and focus it, much like a lens can focus a beam of light," said lead author David Smith, professor and chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke. "Our proposed system would be able to automatically and continuously charge any device anywhere within a room, making dead batteries a thing of the past."

The problem to date has been that the antennas in a wireless power transfer system would need to be able to focus on any device within a room. This could be done, for example, with a movable antenna dish, but that would take up too much space, and nobody wants a big, moving satellite dish on their mantel.

Another solution is a phased array — an antenna with a lot of tiny antennas grouped together, each of which can be independently adjusted and tuned. That technology also exists, but would cost too much and consume too much energy for household use.

The solution proposed in the new paper instead relies on metamaterials — a synthetic material composed of many individual, engineered cells that together produce properties not found in nature.

"Imagine you have an electromagnetic wave front moving through a flat surface made of thousands of tiny electrical cells," said Smith. "If you can tune each cell to manipulate the wave in a specific way, you can dictate exactly what the field looks like when it comes out on the other side."

Smith and his laboratory used this same principle to create the world’s first cloaking device that bends electromagnetic waves around an object held within. Several years ago, Nathan Kundtz, a former graduate student and postdoc from Smith’s group, led an ISF team that developed the metamaterials technology for satellite communications. The team founded Kymeta, which builds powerful, flat antennas that could soon replace the gigantic revolving satellite dishes often seen atop large boats. Three other companies, Evolv, Echodyne and Pivotal have also been founded using different versions of the metamaterials for imaging, radar and wireless communications, respectively.

In the paper, the research team works through calculations to illustrate what a metamaterials-based wireless power system would be capable of. According to the results, a flat metamaterial device no bigger than a typical flat-screen television could focus beams of microwave energy down to a spot about the size of a cell phone within a distance of up to ten meters. It should also be capable of powering more than one device at the same time.

There are, of course, challenges to engineering such a wireless power transfer system. A powerful, low-cost, and highly efficient electromagnetic energy source would need to be developed. The system would have to automatically shut off if a person or a pet were to walk into the focused electromagnetic beam. And the software and controls for the metamaterial lens would have to be optimized to focus powerful beams while suppressing any unwanted secondary "ghost" beams.

But the technology is there, the researchers say.

"All of these issues are possible to overcome — they aren’t roadblocks," said Smith. "I think building a system like this, which could be embedded in the ceiling and wirelessly charge everything in a room, is a very feasible scheme."

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Rajesh Rao Chet Moritz Howard Chizeck Matt Reynolds Smith_Joshua__1457646140_128.95.215.177 Blake Hannaford Chris Rudell Visvesh Sathe
Rajesh Rao Chet Moritz Howard Chizeck Matt Reynolds Joshua Smith Blake Hannaford Chris Rudell Visvesh Sathe
To support the development of implantable devices that can restore movement, and improve the overall quality of life, for people with spinal cord injury or stroke, UW’s Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE) has received $16 million in funding from the National Science Foundation. The funding, dispersed during the next four years, will allow researchers to continue their cutting-edge work, with the goal of having proof-of-concept demonstrations in humans within the next five years. Based at the UW, the CSNE is directed by EE Adjunct Faculty member Rajesh Rao, who is a UW professor of computer science and engineering. Founded in 2011, the CSNE is one of 17 Engineering Research Centers funded by the National Science Foundation. Core partners are located at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and San Diego State University. A prime example of cross-campus collaboration, research is being undertaken by a multi-disciplinary team including several UW EE faculty members: Howard Chizeck, Blake Hannaford, Matt Reynolds, Chris Rudell, Visvesh Sathe and Joshua Smith. “UW is extremely fortunate to have visionary leaders in Director Rajesh Rao and Deputy Director Chet Moritz, who are spearheading the cutting edge research at CSNE,” said EE Chair Radha Poovendran. “Under their leadership, the CSNE is growing to be a place where fundamental and translation research for the benefit of society are fostered.” To restore sensorimotor function and neurorehabilitation, CSNE researchers are working to build closed-loop co-adaptive bi-directional brain-computer interfaces that can both record from and stimulate the central nervous system. The devices essentially form a bridge between lost brain connections, achieved by decoding brain signals produced when a person decides they would like to move their arm and grasp a cup. Specific parts of the spinal cord are then stimulated to achieve the desired action. By wirelessly transmitting information, damaged areas of the brain are avoided. Researchers are also working to improve current devices on the market, such as deep brain stimulators that are used to treat Parkinson’s disease. A challenge with current systems is that they are constantly “on” and may provide stimulation to patients when not needed, resulting in unintended side effects as well as reduced battery life. CSNE researchers are working to make these systems "closed-loop," turning them on only when the patient intends to move. See Also: Seattle Times Article UW Today Article [post_title] => CSNE Receives $16 Million to Continue Developing Implantable Devices to Treat Paralysis [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => csne-receives-16-million-to-continue-developing-implantable-devices-to-treat-paralysis [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-16 15:41:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-16 23:41:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=1407 [menu_order] => 904 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => block--spotlight-tiles ) [_finalHTML:protected] => [_postID:protected] => 805 [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) [_block:protected] => [_db:protected] => WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [post_type] => 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[post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10784" align="alignleft" width="585"] From left to right: Jose Tomas Arenas, James Rosenthal, Eleftherios Kampianakis, Apoorva Sharma and Professor Matt Reynolds.[/caption] By: Tommy Merth At the 11th annual IEEE International Conference on RFID (IEEE RFID), four graduate students in Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering Matt Reynolds’ Lab were honored with the 2017 Best Poster Award. The team, composed of Jose Tomas Arenas, James Rosenthal, Eleftherios Kampianakis and Apoorva Sharma, investigates wireless neural recording and stimulation devices for neuroprosthetics applications. Their award winning work, titled “A Dual-Band Wireless Power Transfer and Backscatter Communication Approach for Implantable Neuroprosthetic Devices,” describes their approach to high data transfer rates while reducing power consumption by a factor of 100 over conventional Wi-Fi. The IEEE RFID conference is the premier conference for exchanging technical research in RFID and allows researchers to share, discuss and witness research results in all areas of RFID technologies and their applications, including energy harvesting, Internet of Things (IoT), localization, and security. Congratulations to the team! [post_title] => Graduate student team wins best poster award at IEEE conference [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-student-team-wins-best-poster-award-at-ieee-conference [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-13 14:33:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-13 21:33:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10773 [menu_order] => 27 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9867 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-02-09 14:38:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-09 22:38:30 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_9869" align="aligncenter" width="854"]170131-iv-pano This panoramic image captures the beamed-power setup. Associate Professor Matt Reynolds (far left) stands with Intellectual Ventures’ Wayt Gibbs, Rita Rogers and Russell Hannigan (left to right). Credit: GeekWire Photo / Alan Boyle[/caption] In the early 1900s, Nikola Tesla envisioned a structure that could deliver power through air, without connectors. The Wardenclyffe Tower, also known as the Tesla Tower, became a lost dream when its investment dwindled. Associate Professor Matt Reynolds and his team at Intellectual Ventures are developing novel approaches to wireless power transmissions that make this power possible and profitable. The novel approach involves metamaterials. This technology has gained attention by offering real-world legitimacy to Harry Potter’s “invisibility cloak.” Simply, metamaterials are a class of material engineered to produce properties that don’t occur naturally. For wizard enthusiasts, some metamaterials can bend electromagnetic radiation (e.g. light) around an object, giving the appearance that it isn’t there at all. For Reynolds and his team, these materials allow about 8 watts’ worth of microwaves to be beamed across a lab space, lighting up an array of LED lights by shooting microwaves at a metamaterials-based reflective array. This array is about the size of a chalkboard, allowing the microwaves to focus on their intended target. The researchers expect to scale up the system to power devices at distances of 160 feet (the width of a football field) or more. By increasing the range, they will be able to apply the technology to drone flight. On average, free-flying drones are limited to 20 minutes of flight time. If you could beam enough power to keep them in the air, they could hover indefinitely. This proves a useful feature for individuals who use drones to monitor security perimeters, inspect infrastructure ranging from railways to cellphone towers or produce aerial video footage. This past fall, Reynolds and collaborators released new research on the development of a wireless charging hub. The new system involving metamaterials could be adapted to create wall panels capable for home charging. Reynolds said today’s wireless charging systems tend to take advantage of electromagnetic induction, which only works over a short range. An example of this would be an electric toothbrush. The toothbrush sits on a charging stand, which produces a proximal interaction. “In order to get longer-range wireless power, you need to use fundamentally different physics,” Reynolds said in a recent article. This fundamentally different physics, ushered in through metamaterials, has distinct advantages over similar wireless power systems, such as laser-beamed power systems or induction stations. The microwave beam can be focused and redirected with relatively high efficiency and with no moving parts. Currently, the team is looking at high-end and large-scale applications. However, if researchers can operate the system at higher frequencies in the future, that could encourage the development of smaller devices that cost less and are capable of beaming out more power. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0AGs7ZyeWM Additional News: [post_title] => Professor Matt Reynolds Works with Intellectual Ventures to Power Drones Wirelessly [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => associate-professor-matt-reynolds-works-with-intellectual-ventures-to-power-drones-wirelessly [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-20 21:02:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-21 05:02:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=9867 [menu_order] => 67 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7850 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2016-10-24 10:16:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-24 17:16:08 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_7852" align="alignleft" width="370"]EE Associate Professor Matt Reynolds is co-author on the paper. EE Associate Professor Matt Reynolds is co-author on the paper.[/caption]

A flat-screen panel that resembles a TV on your living room wall could one day remotely charge any device within its line of sight, according to new research.

In a paper published Oct. 23, 2016, on the arXiv pre-print repository, engineers at the University of Washington, Duke University and Intellectual Ventures’ Invention Science Fund (ISF) show that the technology already exists to build such a system — it’s only a matter of taking the time to design it.

"There is an enormous demand for alternatives to today's clunky charging pads and cumbersome cables, which restrict the mobility of a smart phone or a tablet. Our proposed approach takes advantage of widely used LCD technology to seamlessly deliver wireless power to all kinds of smart devices,” said co-author Matt Reynolds, UW associate professor of electrical engineering and of computer science and engineering.

"The ability to safely direct focused beams of microwave energy to charge specific devices, while avoiding unwanted exposure to people, pets and other objects, is a game-changer for wireless power. And we’re looking into alternatives to liquid crystals that could allow energy transfer at much higher power levels over greater distances," Reynolds said.

Some wireless charging systems already exist to help power speakers, cell phones and tablets. These technologies rely on platforms that require their own wires, however, and the devices must be placed in the immediate vicinity of the charging station.

This is because existing chargers use the resonant magnetic near-field to transmit energy. The magnetic field produced by current flowing in a coil of wire can be quite large close to the coil and can be used to induce a similar current in a neighboring coil. Magnetic fields also have the added bonus of being considered safe for human exposure, making them a convenient choice for wireless power transfer.

The magnetic near-field approach is not an option for power transfer over larger distances. This is because the coupling between source and receiver — and thus the power transfer efficiency — drops rapidly with distance. The wireless power transfer system proposed in the new paper operates at much higher microwave frequencies, where the power transfer distance can extend well beyond the confines of a room.

To maintain reasonable levels of power transfer efficiency, the key to the system is to operate in the Fresnel zone — a region of an electromagnetic field that can be focused, allowing power density to reach levels sufficient to charge many devices with high efficiency.

"As long as you’re within a certain distance, you can build antennas that gather electromagnetic energy and focus it, much like a lens can focus a beam of light," said lead author David Smith, professor and chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke. "Our proposed system would be able to automatically and continuously charge any device anywhere within a room, making dead batteries a thing of the past."

The problem to date has been that the antennas in a wireless power transfer system would need to be able to focus on any device within a room. This could be done, for example, with a movable antenna dish, but that would take up too much space, and nobody wants a big, moving satellite dish on their mantel.

Another solution is a phased array — an antenna with a lot of tiny antennas grouped together, each of which can be independently adjusted and tuned. That technology also exists, but would cost too much and consume too much energy for household use.

The solution proposed in the new paper instead relies on metamaterials — a synthetic material composed of many individual, engineered cells that together produce properties not found in nature.

"Imagine you have an electromagnetic wave front moving through a flat surface made of thousands of tiny electrical cells," said Smith. "If you can tune each cell to manipulate the wave in a specific way, you can dictate exactly what the field looks like when it comes out on the other side."

Smith and his laboratory used this same principle to create the world’s first cloaking device that bends electromagnetic waves around an object held within. Several years ago, Nathan Kundtz, a former graduate student and postdoc from Smith’s group, led an ISF team that developed the metamaterials technology for satellite communications. The team founded Kymeta, which builds powerful, flat antennas that could soon replace the gigantic revolving satellite dishes often seen atop large boats. Three other companies, Evolv, Echodyne and Pivotal have also been founded using different versions of the metamaterials for imaging, radar and wireless communications, respectively.

In the paper, the research team works through calculations to illustrate what a metamaterials-based wireless power system would be capable of. According to the results, a flat metamaterial device no bigger than a typical flat-screen television could focus beams of microwave energy down to a spot about the size of a cell phone within a distance of up to ten meters. It should also be capable of powering more than one device at the same time.

There are, of course, challenges to engineering such a wireless power transfer system. A powerful, low-cost, and highly efficient electromagnetic energy source would need to be developed. The system would have to automatically shut off if a person or a pet were to walk into the focused electromagnetic beam. And the software and controls for the metamaterial lens would have to be optimized to focus powerful beams while suppressing any unwanted secondary "ghost" beams.

But the technology is there, the researchers say.

"All of these issues are possible to overcome — they aren’t roadblocks," said Smith. "I think building a system like this, which could be embedded in the ceiling and wirelessly charge everything in a room, is a very feasible scheme."

[post_title] => Professor Reynolds Proposes New Approach for Wireless Charging [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-reynolds-excels-research-for-mass-charging-hub [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-24 16:54:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-24 23:54:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=7850 [menu_order] => 107 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1601 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2015-10-02 19:04:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-10-02 19:04:05 [post_content] => gropu2SNUPI Technologies, a start-up cofounded by UW EE and CSE Professors Shwetak Patel and Matt Reynolds, UW EE alum Gabe Cohn (Ph.D. ’14) and CSE alum Jeremy Jaech has sold its WallyHome sensor technology to Sears. SNUPI’s first product, the WallyHome water leak detection system alerts homeowners to problems such as water leaks by monitoring changes in temperature and moisture. With the acquisition of WallyHome, Sears hopes to strengthen its current line of smart home devices. According to the deal, Sears will open a new office on the UW campus and add four new employees. The co-founders of SNUPI Technologies also will provide consulting servies to Sears for the development of new products. See Also [post_title] => SNUPI Start-up Sells WallyHome Sensor Technology to Sears [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => snupi-start-up-sells-wallyhome-sensor-technology-to-sears [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-22 22:02:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-22 22:02:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=1601 [menu_order] => 873 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1407 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2015-12-11 00:58:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-11 00:58:54 [post_content] =>
Rajesh Rao Chet Moritz Howard Chizeck Matt Reynolds Smith_Joshua__1457646140_128.95.215.177 Blake Hannaford Chris Rudell Visvesh Sathe
Rajesh Rao Chet Moritz Howard Chizeck Matt Reynolds Joshua Smith Blake Hannaford Chris Rudell Visvesh Sathe
To support the development of implantable devices that can restore movement, and improve the overall quality of life, for people with spinal cord injury or stroke, UW’s Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE) has received $16 million in funding from the National Science Foundation. The funding, dispersed during the next four years, will allow researchers to continue their cutting-edge work, with the goal of having proof-of-concept demonstrations in humans within the next five years. Based at the UW, the CSNE is directed by EE Adjunct Faculty member Rajesh Rao, who is a UW professor of computer science and engineering. Founded in 2011, the CSNE is one of 17 Engineering Research Centers funded by the National Science Foundation. Core partners are located at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and San Diego State University. A prime example of cross-campus collaboration, research is being undertaken by a multi-disciplinary team including several UW EE faculty members: Howard Chizeck, Blake Hannaford, Matt Reynolds, Chris Rudell, Visvesh Sathe and Joshua Smith. “UW is extremely fortunate to have visionary leaders in Director Rajesh Rao and Deputy Director Chet Moritz, who are spearheading the cutting edge research at CSNE,” said EE Chair Radha Poovendran. “Under their leadership, the CSNE is growing to be a place where fundamental and translation research for the benefit of society are fostered.” To restore sensorimotor function and neurorehabilitation, CSNE researchers are working to build closed-loop co-adaptive bi-directional brain-computer interfaces that can both record from and stimulate the central nervous system. The devices essentially form a bridge between lost brain connections, achieved by decoding brain signals produced when a person decides they would like to move their arm and grasp a cup. Specific parts of the spinal cord are then stimulated to achieve the desired action. By wirelessly transmitting information, damaged areas of the brain are avoided. Researchers are also working to improve current devices on the market, such as deep brain stimulators that are used to treat Parkinson’s disease. A challenge with current systems is that they are constantly “on” and may provide stimulation to patients when not needed, resulting in unintended side effects as well as reduced battery life. CSNE researchers are working to make these systems "closed-loop," turning them on only when the patient intends to move. See Also: Seattle Times Article UW Today Article [post_title] => CSNE Receives $16 Million to Continue Developing Implantable Devices to Treat Paralysis [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => csne-receives-16-million-to-continue-developing-implantable-devices-to-treat-paralysis [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-16 15:41:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-16 23:41:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=1407 [menu_order] => 904 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 5 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10773 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2017-06-11 14:29:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-11 21:29:27 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10784" align="alignleft" width="585"] From left to right: Jose Tomas Arenas, James Rosenthal, Eleftherios Kampianakis, Apoorva Sharma and Professor Matt Reynolds.[/caption] By: Tommy Merth At the 11th annual IEEE International Conference on RFID (IEEE RFID), four graduate students in Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering Matt Reynolds’ Lab were honored with the 2017 Best Poster Award. The team, composed of Jose Tomas Arenas, James Rosenthal, Eleftherios Kampianakis and Apoorva Sharma, investigates wireless neural recording and stimulation devices for neuroprosthetics applications. Their award winning work, titled “A Dual-Band Wireless Power Transfer and Backscatter Communication Approach for Implantable Neuroprosthetic Devices,” describes their approach to high data transfer rates while reducing power consumption by a factor of 100 over conventional Wi-Fi. The IEEE RFID conference is the premier conference for exchanging technical research in RFID and allows researchers to share, discuss and witness research results in all areas of RFID technologies and their applications, including energy harvesting, Internet of Things (IoT), localization, and security. Congratulations to the team! 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Representative Publications

  • S. Thomas, R. Harrison, A. Leonardo, and M. Reynolds, "A Battery-Free Multi-Channel Digital Neural/EMG Telemetry System for Flying Insects", IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, vol. 6, no. 5, Oct. 2012, pp. 424-436.
  • J. Hunt, T. Driscoll, A. Mrozack, G. Lipworth, M. Reynolds, D. Brady, D. Smith, "Metamaterial Apertures for Computational Imaging", Science, 18 January 2013: 339 (6117), pp. 310-313.
  • J. Ensworth and M. Reynolds, "Every Smart Phone is a Backscatter Reader: Modulated Backscatter Compatibility with Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy (BLE) Devices", in Proceedings IEEE RFID 2015, pp. 78-85.
  • J. Besnoff and M. Reynolds, "Single-Wire Radio Frequency Transmission Lines In Biological Tissue", Applied Physics Letters, vol. 106, 183705 (2015).
  • I. Cnaan-On, S. Thomas, J. Krolik, and M. Reynolds, "Multichannel Backscatter Communication and Ranging for Distributed Sensing with an FMCW Radar", IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, vol. 63, no. 7, pp. 2375-2383 (2015).
  • G. Lipworth, J. Ensworth, K. Seetharam, J.S. Lee, P. Schmalenberg, T. Nomura, M. Reynolds, D. R. Smith, Y. Urzhumov, "Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials", Nature Scientific Reports 5, 12764 (2015)

Research Areas

Affiliations

Innovation/Entrepreneurship

Education

  • Ph.D. 2003
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • M.Eng., 1999
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • S.B. 1998
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology