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Howard Jay Chizeck

  • Professor

Appointments

Professor, Electrical Engineering
Adjunct Professor, Bioengineering
Co-Director UW Biorobotics Laboratory
Graduate Program in Neuroscience
UW CoMotion Presidential Innovation Fellow
Research Thrust Testbed Co-Leader

Biography

Howard Jay Chizeck received his B.S and M.S. degrees from Case Western Reserve University, and the Sc.D. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1982. He has been a faculty member and Department Chair at two major research universities – in a small department at a private university and in a large department at a public university. From 1981 until 1998 he was at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, serving as Chair of the Department of Systems, Control and Industrial Engineering from 1995 – 1998. He was the Chair of the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Washington in Seattle from August 1998- September 2003. During that time the department experienced a period of dramatic and positive change. Both the undergraduate and graduate programs grew in quality, size and national rankings. Research activity and funding rapidly increased, from ($5.0M new grants/$6M expenditures) in 1998-1999 to approximately ($20M new grants/$15M expenditures) in both 2001-2002 and 2002-2003. External recognition of the departmental improvement, in terms of the US News and World Report rankings, improved (undergraduate and graduate) from the high 20’s to the mid-teens.

Currently, he is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Washington. Professor Chizeck is a research thrust leader for the NSF Engineering Research Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering and also co-director of the UW BioRobotics Laboratory. His research interests are in telerobotics and neural engineering. His telerobotic research includes haptic navigation and control for robotic surgery and for underwater devices, as well as security of telerobotic systems.. His neural engineering work involves the design and security of brain-machine interfaces, and the development of assistive devices to restore hand and locomotion capabilities.

Professor Chizeck was elected a Fellow of the IEEE in 1999 “for contributions to the use of control system theory in biomedical engineering” and he was elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) College of Fellows in 2011 for “contributions to the use of control system theory in functional electrical stimulation assisted walking.” From 2008-2012 he was a member of the Science Technology Advisory Panel of The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Professor Chizeck currently serves on the Visiting Committee of the Case School of Engineering (Case Western Reserve University). He has been involved with several start-up companies. He is a founder and member of the Board of Directors of Controlsoft Inc (Ohio) and also is a founder and Chair of the Board of Directors of BluHaptics, Inc., which was established in 2013 to commercialize haptic rendering, haptic navigation and other UW telerobotic technologies.

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UW EE Professors Les Atlas, Karl Böhringer, Howard Chizeck, Blake Hannaford, Eric Klavins, Arka Majumdar, Shwetak Patel and Joshua Smith were awarded the 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellowship.  In a partnership with the University of Washington, Amazon Catalyst supports bold solutions to world problems. The program provides funding, mentorship and community to the innovative projects.

Congratulations to all newly-minted Amazon Catalyst Fellows!

The Projects:

simsong.org
PI: Les Atlas

Active self-cleaning technology for solar panels
PI: Karl Böhringer

Haptic Passwords
PI: Howard Chizeck

IRA, the robot surgical assistant
PI: Blake Hannaford

UW BIOFAB: A cloud laboratory for genetic engineering
PI: Eric Klavins

Smart Eyewear
PI: Arka Majumdar

OsteoApp
PI: Shwetak Patel

Enabling district shared parking via energy harvesting wireless sensing technology
PI: Joshua Smith
                    [post_title] => 8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10252" align="alignleft" width="434"]bluhaptics_group-3 The BluHaptics team (from left): Steve White (BSEE '85), Don Pickering, Griffin Downs, Luke Wissmann, Howard Chizeck, Ryan Cox (BSEE '15), Andy Stewart and Fredrik Rydén (Ph.D. '13).[/caption]

BluHaptics, the software company pioneering new solutions for telerobotics, has secured new funding from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to apply its software to remote robotic operations in space.

The funding was a part of NASA’s $49.9 million investment in the latest round of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBTT) grants. Those selected were considered top submissions for technical merits and feasibility.

BluHaptics’ software addresses some of the current challenges of robotic use in space. Because of a reliance on remotely operated robots for general operations in space, the software must perform with control and precision. Through advanced applications of real-time modeling, force feedback and machine learning, BluHaptics’ software gives users better control over remotely operated robots.

“Even simple tasks in space require more skill than either manual control or automation alone can provide,” explains BluHaptics CEO Don Pickering in a recent press release. “Our software bridges the gap between humans and machines to allow them to augment each other and work together effectively to accomplish complex, high-risk tasks.”

The functionality of the software ranges from general maintenance to high-risk scenarios. It has applications in satellite and Space Station repair and maintenance, lunar and Mars programs habitat construction and astronaut life support system assurance.

BluHaptics has grown significantly since its origins at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering. The startup was founded by UW Electrical Engineering Professor Howard Chizeck and then doctoral student Fredrik Rydén (Ph.D. ’13). The company grew out of the work Chizeck and Rydén were conducting on haptic interaction, which relays forces, vibrations and motion to operators of robotic systems.

Rydén is now Chief Technology Officer for BluHaptics. He and other researchers at the company have integrated advanced applications of the software’s core technologies, creating the next generation of software for telerobotics. The design of a more user-friendly, visual interface has fueled its trajectory to space operations.

Last year, BluHaptics received a Phase II SBIR grant from the National Science Foundation to develop the company’s remotely operated vehicle (ROV) piloting software for subsea operations. The commercial release of this application for underwater manipulator arms will launch in summer 2017.

---

This article was adapted from a recent press release. More news: GeekWire [post_title] => Startup BluHaptics Receives NASA Funding to Venture into Space Robotics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => startup-bluhaptics-receives-nasa-funding-to-venture-into-space-robotics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-04 11:13:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-04 18:13:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10594 [menu_order] => 50 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10063 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-01 17:35:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-02 01:35:06 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10066" align="alignleft" width="349"]dsc_0078 BluHaptics VP of Engineering Steve White (BSEE ’85), co-founder Fredrik Rydén (Ph.D. ’13) and CEO Don Pickering, from left, in their Fremont office space.[/caption] BluHaptics, the software company pioneering new solutions for telerobotics, has secured $1.36 million. This investment follows more than a million dollars in recent U.S. government grants, which together will be used to support the company’s expansion and launch of its first commercially-available product. The startup was founded by UW Electrical Engineering Professor Howard Chizeck and then doctoral student Fredrik Rydén (Ph.D. '13). The company grew out of the work Chizeck and Rydén were conducting on haptic interaction, which relays forces, vibrations and motion to operators of robotic systems. Rydén is now Chief Technology Officer for BluHaptics. He and other researchers at the company have integrated advanced applications of three core technologies – real-time modeling, machine learning and haptic feedback – to create the next generation of software for telerobotics. Featuring a more user-friendly, visual interface, this new system makes it significantly easier for operators to interact with and control remote robots in often dangerous and unpredictable environments. “We are meeting with companies in the subsea and space sectors who are particularly impressed with the ease and precision our interactive software brings to mission-critical tasks,” explains BluHaptics CEO Don Pickering. “Whether robots are working deep in the ocean on an oil rig or in space to maintain satellites, our software is extending the reach of what robotics can achieve while at the same time enhancing productivity and safety.” [caption id="attachment_2311" align="alignright" width="189"]Howard Chizeck Professor Howard Chizeck[/caption]

BluHaptics' devices are unique in that they use force-feedback control systems and 3-D displays to let customers control robots more easily and efficiently. The software can be used with oil rigs, excavation tools and - eventually - with satellites and drones.

The robotics market is poised for significant growth, with International Data Corporation anticipating worldwide spending on robotics and related services to hit $135.4 billion in 2019, up from an estimated $71 billion in global robotics spending in 2015.

The company, which currently has six full-time and two part-time employees, is continually applying for patents. BluHaptics was awarded two patents last fall, and another four are pending. The company’s application for underwater manipulator arms will release this summer. 

Seattle Angel Fund, a member-directed investment fund focusing on early-stage, growth-oriented businesses in the Pacific Northwest, led the round of investments with participation from Seattle’s Alliance of Angels. “We are as excited about the management team they have put in place as we are about their groundbreaking technology,” said Susan Preston, managing member of the Seattle Angel Fund. “We believe BluHaptics is well poised to transform the telerobotics market.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohusjR82Nsw [post_title] => Startup BluHaptics Raises $1.3M to Bring Its Underwater Software to Space [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => startup-bluhaptics-raises-1-3m-to-bring-its-underwater-software-to-space [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-30 11:11:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-30 18:11:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10063 [menu_order] => 71 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5181 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-07-15 20:31:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-15 20:31:21 [post_content] => ScreenShot2016-07-14at3.04.06PMIt began as a surgical device for the military, one that could fit in an armored vehicle in the combat zone. However, the robot – named Raven II – became a strong platform for advancing the software, the control, and network security for medical robotics. Motherboard visited the BioRobotics Lab at the University of Washington, illustrating what happens when you hack a surgical robot. In the video, the online magazine speaks with electrical engineering professors, Dr. Howard Chizeck and Dr. Blake Hannaford, and researcher, Dr. Tamara Bonaci at the University of Washington. The opportunities in using a remote robotic machine are numerous; the most beneficial is that you can send a robot into dire conditions. “There are many places you do not want to send humans – underwater, a biohazard area, through high temperature, firefighting, toxic areas, radioactivity, mining and space,” said Professor Chizeck. “If you’re sending a robot, but you still want to have control, you have a communication link. However, there’s the potential that the link can be compromised, so you want to keep that safe and secure.” Because the distance between the robot operator and device is often extensive, there is an increased chance of interception. In order to keep the robot safe and secure, researchers in the lab must think like attackers - they become the hackers. “My job is to try and hack the robot,” Dr. Bonaci said. “From this, we can see what safety measures need to be done.” One hack called the “man in the middle attack” tricks the robot into thinking that it is talking to the surgeon, when, in reality, it is speaking with an attacker. A hacker interrupts the signal and controls the motion of the device, leading to a potentially fatal situation. According to Professor Chizeck, these types of attacks have already been demonstrated in the operations of other medical devices, like pacemakers and insulin packs. Allowing hackers to penetrate the precarious, delicate movements of a surgeon is not only deadly, but also hard to detect, a “subtle assassination” with a minimal crime trail. Before releasing Raven II to human operations, researchers will investigate all ways to intercept the device, finding the vulnerabilities before giving the hackers a chance to look for them. [post_title] => Professors Hack Surgical Robot in Motherboard Special [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-professors-hack-surgical-robot-in-motherboard-special [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-07 15:03:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-07 23:03:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=5181 [menu_order] => 130 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5173 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-07-15 20:26:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-15 20:26:55 [post_content] => ScreenShot2016-07-11at4.47.54PM[July 11, 2016] This past week, the nation experienced deep tremors in the wake of police shootings. After white police officers killed Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, the continued dialogue of racial bias flooded onto the streets in the form protests and marches. On July 7, these protests turned deadly as a gunman killed five police officers in Dallas. After a long-winded standoff between police and the suspect, a robot carrying a bomb killed the gunman. Although robot use by police is relatively rare as an offensive tactic, these types of robots are used by military personnel and law enforcement throughout the nation.  Electrical Engineering Professor Howard Chizeck offered insight into the use of these robots on a National Public Radio (NPR) special.  According to Chizeck, there are three types of robots – industrial, autonomous and semi-autonomous, or telerobotics. Although autonomous robots are often captured in filmdom (i.e. The Terminator) and are the most notorious, telerobotics have a prolific place within law enforcement and the military. According to Professor Chizeck, these types of robots are used within search and rescue missions, bomb-diffusing situations, drone surveillance, and, in the case of the 2016 Dallas shootings, bomb detonation. “With these types of robots, there is always a human in the loop,” Chizeck said. Because of this constant conversation between robot and law enforcement, the officers could effectively approach the shooter without risking the lives of any of their men and women. Although this semi-autonomous approach offers public safety opportunities, it also carries potential risks. “There is a risk that the robot can be hacked,” Chizeck said. “If someone disrupts its information stream, the hacker could potentially take over and control the robot.” [post_title] => Professor Chizeck Weighs in on Police Robots on NPR Special [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-chizeck-weighs-in-on-police-robots-on-npr-special [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-07-15 20:26:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-07-15 20:26:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=5173 [menu_order] => 132 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => block--spotlight-tiles ) 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The program provides funding, mentorship and community to the innovative projects. Congratulations to all newly-minted Amazon Catalyst Fellows! The Projects: simsong.org PI: Les Atlas Active self-cleaning technology for solar panels PI: Karl Böhringer Haptic Passwords PI: Howard Chizeck IRA, the robot surgical assistant PI: Blake Hannaford UW BIOFAB: A cloud laboratory for genetic engineering PI: Eric Klavins Smart Eyewear PI: Arka Majumdar OsteoApp PI: Shwetak Patel Enabling district shared parking via energy harvesting wireless sensing technology PI: Joshua Smith [post_title] => 8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-faculty-named-2017-amazon-catalyst-fellows [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-21 13:33:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-21 20:33:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11006 [menu_order] => 22 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10922 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-06-27 10:54:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-27 17:54:20 [post_content] => [post_title] => Researchers deliver first targeted treatment for movement disorder [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => researchers-deliver-first-targeted-treatment-for-movement-disorder [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-27 10:54:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-27 17:54:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10922 [menu_order] => 28 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10594 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-05-04 11:13:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-04 18:13:57 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10252" align="alignleft" width="434"]bluhaptics_group-3 The BluHaptics team (from left): Steve White (BSEE '85), Don Pickering, Griffin Downs, Luke Wissmann, Howard Chizeck, Ryan Cox (BSEE '15), Andy Stewart and Fredrik Rydén (Ph.D. '13).[/caption] BluHaptics, the software company pioneering new solutions for telerobotics, has secured new funding from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to apply its software to remote robotic operations in space. The funding was a part of NASA’s $49.9 million investment in the latest round of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBTT) grants. Those selected were considered top submissions for technical merits and feasibility. BluHaptics’ software addresses some of the current challenges of robotic use in space. Because of a reliance on remotely operated robots for general operations in space, the software must perform with control and precision. Through advanced applications of real-time modeling, force feedback and machine learning, BluHaptics’ software gives users better control over remotely operated robots. “Even simple tasks in space require more skill than either manual control or automation alone can provide,” explains BluHaptics CEO Don Pickering in a recent press release. “Our software bridges the gap between humans and machines to allow them to augment each other and work together effectively to accomplish complex, high-risk tasks.” The functionality of the software ranges from general maintenance to high-risk scenarios. It has applications in satellite and Space Station repair and maintenance, lunar and Mars programs habitat construction and astronaut life support system assurance. BluHaptics has grown significantly since its origins at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering. The startup was founded by UW Electrical Engineering Professor Howard Chizeck and then doctoral student Fredrik Rydén (Ph.D. ’13). The company grew out of the work Chizeck and Rydén were conducting on haptic interaction, which relays forces, vibrations and motion to operators of robotic systems. Rydén is now Chief Technology Officer for BluHaptics. He and other researchers at the company have integrated advanced applications of the software’s core technologies, creating the next generation of software for telerobotics. The design of a more user-friendly, visual interface has fueled its trajectory to space operations. Last year, BluHaptics received a Phase II SBIR grant from the National Science Foundation to develop the company’s remotely operated vehicle (ROV) piloting software for subsea operations. The commercial release of this application for underwater manipulator arms will launch in summer 2017.

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This article was adapted from a recent press release. More news: GeekWire [post_title] => Startup BluHaptics Receives NASA Funding to Venture into Space Robotics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => startup-bluhaptics-receives-nasa-funding-to-venture-into-space-robotics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-04 11:13:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-04 18:13:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10594 [menu_order] => 50 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10063 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-01 17:35:06 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-02 01:35:06 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10066" align="alignleft" width="349"]dsc_0078 BluHaptics VP of Engineering Steve White (BSEE ’85), co-founder Fredrik Rydén (Ph.D. ’13) and CEO Don Pickering, from left, in their Fremont office space.[/caption] BluHaptics, the software company pioneering new solutions for telerobotics, has secured $1.36 million. This investment follows more than a million dollars in recent U.S. government grants, which together will be used to support the company’s expansion and launch of its first commercially-available product. The startup was founded by UW Electrical Engineering Professor Howard Chizeck and then doctoral student Fredrik Rydén (Ph.D. '13). The company grew out of the work Chizeck and Rydén were conducting on haptic interaction, which relays forces, vibrations and motion to operators of robotic systems. Rydén is now Chief Technology Officer for BluHaptics. He and other researchers at the company have integrated advanced applications of three core technologies – real-time modeling, machine learning and haptic feedback – to create the next generation of software for telerobotics. Featuring a more user-friendly, visual interface, this new system makes it significantly easier for operators to interact with and control remote robots in often dangerous and unpredictable environments. “We are meeting with companies in the subsea and space sectors who are particularly impressed with the ease and precision our interactive software brings to mission-critical tasks,” explains BluHaptics CEO Don Pickering. “Whether robots are working deep in the ocean on an oil rig or in space to maintain satellites, our software is extending the reach of what robotics can achieve while at the same time enhancing productivity and safety.” [caption id="attachment_2311" align="alignright" width="189"]Howard Chizeck Professor Howard Chizeck[/caption]

BluHaptics' devices are unique in that they use force-feedback control systems and 3-D displays to let customers control robots more easily and efficiently. The software can be used with oil rigs, excavation tools and - eventually - with satellites and drones.

The robotics market is poised for significant growth, with International Data Corporation anticipating worldwide spending on robotics and related services to hit $135.4 billion in 2019, up from an estimated $71 billion in global robotics spending in 2015.

The company, which currently has six full-time and two part-time employees, is continually applying for patents. BluHaptics was awarded two patents last fall, and another four are pending. The company’s application for underwater manipulator arms will release this summer. 

Seattle Angel Fund, a member-directed investment fund focusing on early-stage, growth-oriented businesses in the Pacific Northwest, led the round of investments with participation from Seattle’s Alliance of Angels. “We are as excited about the management team they have put in place as we are about their groundbreaking technology,” said Susan Preston, managing member of the Seattle Angel Fund. “We believe BluHaptics is well poised to transform the telerobotics market.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohusjR82Nsw [post_title] => Startup BluHaptics Raises $1.3M to Bring Its Underwater Software to Space [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => startup-bluhaptics-raises-1-3m-to-bring-its-underwater-software-to-space [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-30 11:11:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-30 18:11:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10063 [menu_order] => 71 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5181 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-07-15 20:31:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-15 20:31:21 [post_content] => ScreenShot2016-07-14at3.04.06PMIt began as a surgical device for the military, one that could fit in an armored vehicle in the combat zone. However, the robot – named Raven II – became a strong platform for advancing the software, the control, and network security for medical robotics. Motherboard visited the BioRobotics Lab at the University of Washington, illustrating what happens when you hack a surgical robot. In the video, the online magazine speaks with electrical engineering professors, Dr. Howard Chizeck and Dr. Blake Hannaford, and researcher, Dr. Tamara Bonaci at the University of Washington. The opportunities in using a remote robotic machine are numerous; the most beneficial is that you can send a robot into dire conditions. “There are many places you do not want to send humans – underwater, a biohazard area, through high temperature, firefighting, toxic areas, radioactivity, mining and space,” said Professor Chizeck. “If you’re sending a robot, but you still want to have control, you have a communication link. However, there’s the potential that the link can be compromised, so you want to keep that safe and secure.” Because the distance between the robot operator and device is often extensive, there is an increased chance of interception. In order to keep the robot safe and secure, researchers in the lab must think like attackers - they become the hackers. “My job is to try and hack the robot,” Dr. Bonaci said. “From this, we can see what safety measures need to be done.” One hack called the “man in the middle attack” tricks the robot into thinking that it is talking to the surgeon, when, in reality, it is speaking with an attacker. A hacker interrupts the signal and controls the motion of the device, leading to a potentially fatal situation. According to Professor Chizeck, these types of attacks have already been demonstrated in the operations of other medical devices, like pacemakers and insulin packs. Allowing hackers to penetrate the precarious, delicate movements of a surgeon is not only deadly, but also hard to detect, a “subtle assassination” with a minimal crime trail. Before releasing Raven II to human operations, researchers will investigate all ways to intercept the device, finding the vulnerabilities before giving the hackers a chance to look for them. [post_title] => Professors Hack Surgical Robot in Motherboard Special [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-professors-hack-surgical-robot-in-motherboard-special [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-07 15:03:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-07 23:03:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=5181 [menu_order] => 130 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5173 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-07-15 20:26:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-07-15 20:26:55 [post_content] => ScreenShot2016-07-11at4.47.54PM[July 11, 2016] This past week, the nation experienced deep tremors in the wake of police shootings. After white police officers killed Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, the continued dialogue of racial bias flooded onto the streets in the form protests and marches. On July 7, these protests turned deadly as a gunman killed five police officers in Dallas. After a long-winded standoff between police and the suspect, a robot carrying a bomb killed the gunman. Although robot use by police is relatively rare as an offensive tactic, these types of robots are used by military personnel and law enforcement throughout the nation.  Electrical Engineering Professor Howard Chizeck offered insight into the use of these robots on a National Public Radio (NPR) special.  According to Chizeck, there are three types of robots – industrial, autonomous and semi-autonomous, or telerobotics. Although autonomous robots are often captured in filmdom (i.e. The Terminator) and are the most notorious, telerobotics have a prolific place within law enforcement and the military. According to Professor Chizeck, these types of robots are used within search and rescue missions, bomb-diffusing situations, drone surveillance, and, in the case of the 2016 Dallas shootings, bomb detonation. “With these types of robots, there is always a human in the loop,” Chizeck said. Because of this constant conversation between robot and law enforcement, the officers could effectively approach the shooter without risking the lives of any of their men and women. Although this semi-autonomous approach offers public safety opportunities, it also carries potential risks. “There is a risk that the robot can be hacked,” Chizeck said. “If someone disrupts its information stream, the hacker could potentially take over and control the robot.” [post_title] => Professor Chizeck Weighs in on Police Robots on NPR Special [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-chizeck-weighs-in-on-police-robots-on-npr-special [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-07-15 20:26:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-07-15 20:26:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=5173 [menu_order] => 132 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11006 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-19 16:14:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-19 23:14:01 [post_content] => UW EE Professors Les Atlas, Karl Böhringer, Howard Chizeck, Blake Hannaford, Eric Klavins, Arka Majumdar, Shwetak Patel and Joshua Smith were awarded the 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellowship.  In a partnership with the University of Washington, Amazon Catalyst supports bold solutions to world problems. The program provides funding, mentorship and community to the innovative projects. Congratulations to all newly-minted Amazon Catalyst Fellows! The Projects: simsong.org PI: Les Atlas Active self-cleaning technology for solar panels PI: Karl Böhringer Haptic Passwords PI: Howard Chizeck IRA, the robot surgical assistant PI: Blake Hannaford UW BIOFAB: A cloud laboratory for genetic engineering PI: Eric Klavins Smart Eyewear PI: Arka Majumdar OsteoApp PI: Shwetak Patel Enabling district shared parking via energy harvesting wireless sensing technology PI: Joshua Smith [post_title] => 8 faculty named 2017 Amazon Catalyst Fellows [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-faculty-named-2017-amazon-catalyst-fellows [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-21 13:33:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-21 20:33:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11006 [menu_order] => 22 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 11 [max_num_pages] => 2 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => f5eb8295d85cf33df2fa4441d2eef123 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )

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Howard Jay Chizeck Headshot
Phone206-221-3591
chizeck@uw.edu
Web PageClick Here
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M446 EEB

Associated Labs

Research Areas

Innovation/Entrepreneurship

Education

  • ScD, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1982
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • M.S. Systems and Control Engineering, 1977
    Case Western Reserve University
  • B.S. Systems Engineering, 1974
    Case Western Reserve University