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John D. Sahr

  • Professor

Appointments

Professor, Electrical Engineering
Adjunct Professor, Earth and Space Sciences
Adjunct Professor, Aeronautics and Astronautics

Biography

John Sahr is a professor of electrical engineering, adjunct in Earth and space sciences as well as aeronautics and astronautics.  His research in radar remote sensing of ionospheric turbulence involves the design, construction and operation of innovative passive radar systems, in particular the Manastash Ridge Radar.  Furthermore, Sahr and his students have developed novel Direct Sampling radar receivers which have almost no analog components, and employ high speed sampling and digital signal processing to achieve enormous linearity and dynamic range. Sahr and colleagues have recently filed provisional patents building upon the passive radar receivers in preparation for a startup that has won funding from both the UW CoMotion Innovation Fund and the Washington Research Foundation.

Research Interests

Ionospheric physics; electrojet turbulence; passive bistatic radar; radar remote sensing; radar waveform design; radar interferometry; and statistical signal processing.

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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_1278" align="alignleft" width="168"] Professor John Sahr[/caption]

OneRadio, founded by Professor John Sahr and Affiliate Professor Tony Goodson, demonstrated its wideband radio receiver platform at last week's IEEE Radar Conference in Seattle.

The startup was developed by Sahr and Goodson to create a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions simultaneously. The technology combines hardware advances with software applications to allow users to perform many functions at once via software applications.

The OneRadio utilizes a patent-pending, digitally based method to pick up signals across a wide stretch of frequencies and a wide range of signal strength.

“We have the capability of seeing extremely weak signals in the presence of strong signals,”OneRadio CEO Mohan Vaghul said in a recent article.

OneRadio is designed to do what high-end wideband receivers cannot do and at a tenth of the price. Although high-end receivers can identify weak signals, OneRadio can access signals across a wider bandwidth.

“The long-term potential is pretty phenomenal,” Vaghul said in the article.

For aerospace and defense purposes, one receiver could be used in place of several narrower-band receivers. The OneRadio system could monitor for malicious activities in the telecom and security fields. At last week’s conference, OneRadio conducted live demonstrations of wideband RF operations.

The first-generation platform spans 2.5 GHz of bandwidth. However, the company is making strides in the development of a 7 GHz bandwidth.

The development of this product comes from years of research at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering. Support for OneRadio originated from the UW's CoMotion Innovation Fund. CoMotion is dedicated to expanding the economic and societal reach of the UW community by helping innovators achieve the greatest impact from their discoveries.

“CoMotion is pleased to have worked with this team over the past two years to help commercialize this complex technology by working with them on licensing, patent filings, marketing and business development,” said Vikram Jandhyala, executive director of CoMotion and UW’s vice president for innovation strategy, in the article.

---

Information for this release was adapted from a recent article in GeekWire.

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These cross-disciplinary innovators work together to advance space science and technology. Electrical Engineering Professor John Sahr was appointed as the University of Washington (UW) representative; he will begin on April 1. UW Provost Gerald Baldasty recommended Sahr as the new appointee due to Sahr’s long-term expertise in space sciences and engineering and knowledge of the UW’s role in these areas. In addition to his professorship in electrical engineering, Sahr also has adjunct appointments in earth and space sciences and aeronautics and astronautics. Sahr’s research primarily focuses on VHF radar remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Throughout his time at the UW, Sahr has led many committees and groups and received several top awards, including the NSF’s National Young Investigator Award and the Henry Booker Fellowship. [post_title] => Professor John Sahr Appointed USRA Representative [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-john-sahr-appointed-usra-representative [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-08 15:38:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-08 23:38:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10125 [menu_order] => 68 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1443 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2015-12-08 00:05:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-08 00:05:35 [post_content] => Professor John Sahr and Affiliate Faculty Member Tony Goodson have received CoMotion Innovation Funding to support their collaborative “OneRadio” project. CoMotion Innovation Funding supports projects that are in the early stages of development and have a strong likelihood of being commercialized. The basic concept behind OneRadio is to create a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions. Traditional analog radios employ a 100-year-old analog design that focuses on one frequency at a time. Since each radio function is associated with a frequency, users that perform several functions at a time, such as airlines, must utilize multiple radios. A Boeing 747, for example, carries as many as 30 radios on board. With OneRadio, both strong and weak signals are simultaneously digitized, creating a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions. Separate functions are enabled by simple apps that operate on the OneRadio data stream. "We're about to enter a new era in radio frequency operations, one in which the entire spectrum is digitally exposed to all users,” Tony Goodson said. “Not only will current users benefit, there are bound to be whole new applications we can't even imagine.” With the market for mobile radio continuing to grow, and annual sales between $7-10 billion, OneRadio has the potential to influence new markets. Applications include enhanced traffic monitoring, remote medical monitoring, security systems and more. [post_title] => EE Faculty's OneRadio Project Supported by Innovation Funding [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-facultys-oneradio-project-supported-by-innovation-funding [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-17 15:35:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-17 22:35:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=1443 [menu_order] => 912 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 791 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-01-20 21:01:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-20 21:01:10 [post_content] => STARSProgram Smart city leaders from around the world are gathering at UW’s Seattle campus for a two-day workshop called the “NSF Visioning Workshop on Smart and Connected Communities Research and Education” to discuss the future of smart and connected communities on January 13-14, 2016. The UW Department of Electrical Engineering is organizing and hosting the workshop, on behalf of the National Science Foundation, with the goal of facilitating dialogue between stakeholders, including municipalities, states, cities, universities, industry, federal government and private foundations. The concept of creating smart communities is emerging as a way to address a variety of problems facing both busy urban centers and rural communities. By utilizing data analytics, sensors and other technology, the goal is to overcome various challenges, such as power distribution, healthcare, transportation, air quality and access to education, shelter, water and food. “The NSF visioning workshop on smart and connected communities provides an opportunity for stakeholders to talk about these needs and identify challenges and barriers that need to be overcome, both globally and locally,” said EE Chair Radha Poovendran, who is the chair and principal investigator of the NSF visioning workshop. According to a September 2015 statement from President Barack Obama, the White House announced a new “Smart Cities” initiative that will invest more than $160 million in federal research to help communities improve services. “Every community is different, with different needs and different approaches. But communities that are making the most progress on these issues have some things in common. They don't look for a single silver bullet; instead they bring together local government and nonprofits and businesses and teachers and parents around a shared goal,” according to a statement from President Barack Obama. The NSF visioning workshop brings together 50 leaders from around the world, including leading industry representatives from Honeywell and Amazon, to discuss and define a vision for smart and connected communities. Presentations and discussions highlight a variety of smart community topics, such as city planning and management, urban infrastructure and systems, emerging technologies and social, cultural and economic challenges. An international panel will also feature presentations from leaders from the Netherlands, Japan, Barcelona, China, Japan and Taiwan. Local speakers include Seattle's Chief Technology Officer Michael Mattmiller, who will be speaking about data-driven city management, and Leonard Forsman from the Suquamish Tribe, who will discuss the tribal community’s perspective on smart cities development. A leader in emerging smart community technologies, the UW Department of Electrical Engineering has many faculty researching various components of smart communities, from power systems to transportation to the Internet of Things. UW is also well represented by the newUrban@UW collaboration, led by Associate Professor Thaisa Way, from the UW College of Built Environments, who is an active participant in the NSF visioning workshop. On the founding committee of Urban@UW, Bill Howe, who is the Associate Director and Senior Data Science Fellow for the eScience Institute, is also working to develop smart community programs. A binational smart communities agreement was signed in September 2015 by EE Chair Radha Poovendran, UW Dean of Engineering Mike Bragg, UW President Ana Mari Cauce, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) President Zhang Jie, SJTU CSE Department Chair Guo Minyi and SJTU Research Dean Hui Liu. The agreement formalized the commitment of both universities to work together on smart cities research, teaching and collaboration, with the potential to establish an International Joint Research Lab to develop smart cities technology. See Also: [post_title] => Leaders Gather at UW to Define Vision for Smart Communities [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => leaders-gather-at-uw-to-define-vision-for-smart-communities [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-22 22:15:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-22 22:15:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=791 [menu_order] => 918 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 784 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-01-15 00:23:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-15 00:23:41 [post_content] => johnsahr_000 Anantram chrisrudell xiaodonghe2 Out of eight newly elected 2016 IEEE Seattle Section Officers, four are UW EE faculty members. Congratulations to Professors John Sahr, M.P. Anantram, Chris Rudell and Affiliate Faculty Member Xiaodong He. The new officers were sworn in on January 12, 2016. More details about each faculty member and their IEEE position are provided below: Professor John Sahr Chapter Chair of Education Professor John Sahr specializes in radar remote sensing of the ionosphere. He and his students developed the first passive bistatic VHF radar for E-region turbulence in 1998, and continue that work today. At the UW, Sahr has served seven years as Associate Dean of Undergraduate Academic Affairs for the entire campus. In this role he acted as the Provost’s representative to Washington State committees that coordinated transfer policy among 2- and 4-year colleges, public and private. He also served 2.5 years as the interim director of the Robinson Center for Young Scholars, the UW’s early entrance program. In 2014, Sahr also served as the Interim Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Professor M.P. Anantram Chapter Chair of Antennas and Propagation/Electron Devices/Microwave Theory Professor M.P. Anantram’s group works on the theory and modeling of nanoscale electronic devices and materials. The current focus is multi-scale modeling of phase change and resistive memory devices, modeling of electron transport in DNA, fast algorithms to calculate Gless and their application to model devices based on two dimensional materials such as graphene and boron nitride. Anantram's prior research included the modeling of nanoscale transistors and carbon nanotube devices. He worked at the NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Waterloo before joining UW. Professor Chris Rudell Chapter Chair of Circuits and Systems Professor Chris Rudell joined the EE department as an Assistant Professor in January 2009. Prior to joining UW EE he was an IC Designer and Project Manager with Delco Electronics (now Delphi); a postdoctoral Researcher at the University of California at Berkeley; an Analog/RF IC Design Engineer at Berkana Wireless (now Qualcomm) in San Jose, California, and later became the Design Manager of the Advanced IC Development Group; and worked in the Advanced Radio Technology Group, at Intel, where his work focused mainly on RF transceiver circuits and systems, in advanced silicon processes. His group's research focuses on a broad range of topics related to analog, mixed-signal, RF and mm-wave circuits. Xiaodong He 2016 Chair of IEEE Seattle Section Affiliate faculty member Xiaodong He is a Senior Researcher in the Deep Learning Technology Center of Microsoft Research, in Redmond, WA. His research interests are mainly in the machine intelligence areas, including deep learning, speech, natural language, computer vision, information retrieval, and knowledge representation and management. He has received several awards including the Outstanding Paper Award of ACL 2015. He is a frequent tutorial and keynote speaker at major conferences in these areas. He and colleagues developed the MSR-NRC-SRI entry and the MSR entry that won No. 1 in the 2008 NIST Machine Translation Evaluation and the 2011 IWSLT Evaluation (Chinese-to-English), respectively, and the MSR image captioning system that won the 1st Prize at the MS COCO Captioning Challenge 2015. [post_title] => Four EE Faculty Elected IEEE Seattle Chapter Officers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => four-ee-faculty-elected-ieee-seattle-chapter-officers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-23 16:36:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-23 23:36:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=784 [menu_order] => 921 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 761 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-03-10 20:37:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-10 20:37:43 [post_content] => STARSProgram Professors John Sahr and Linda Bushnell were the stars of the show at a recent information session for students in January 2016. The information session was specifically for students enrolled in the Washington STate Academic RedShirt (STARS) in Engineering Program, which supports incoming freshmen who are interested in pursuing an engineering degree and who are from economically and educationally underserved backgrounds. At the information session, Sahr and Bushnell spoke about their experiences working, teaching and conducting research in electrical engineering. Five electrical engineering students also shared their experiences, from academics to research to internships. With engineering programs having among the most challenging curricula, STARS is designed to help students build the necessary skills and support systems to successfully navigate the challenges they encounter while completing an engineering degree. During their first two years of college, participants receive a specialized curriculum designed to prepare them to pursue an engineering major. As part of the program, they are guaranteed acceptance into one of the UW’s 10 engineering programs. Last year, STARS students had a cumulative GPA that was, on average, 0.33 higher than their non-STARS peers. The STARS program, which was founded in 2013, is an initiative led by EE Professor Eve Riskin, Associate Dean of Diversity and Access. A National Science Foundation grant was secured to start the program. 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before [2] => year [3] => month [4] => monthnum [5] => week [6] => w [7] => dayofyear [8] => day [9] => dayofweek [10] => dayofweek_iso [11] => hour [12] => minute [13] => second ) ) [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.ID FROM wp_posts INNER JOIN wp_postmeta ON ( wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id ) INNER JOIN wp_postmeta AS mt1 ON ( wp_posts.ID = mt1.post_id ) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.post_date > '2015-09-21 23:59:59' ) AND ( ( wp_postmeta.meta_key = 'type' AND wp_postmeta.meta_value LIKE '%news%' ) AND ( mt1.meta_key = 'subjects' AND mt1.meta_value LIKE '%\"897\"%' ) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'spotlight' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.menu_order ASC LIMIT 0, 6 [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10656 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-05-17 15:59:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-17 22:59:36 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_1278" align="alignleft" width="168"] Professor John Sahr[/caption] OneRadio, founded by Professor John Sahr and Affiliate Professor Tony Goodson, demonstrated its wideband radio receiver platform at last week's IEEE Radar Conference in Seattle. The startup was developed by Sahr and Goodson to create a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions simultaneously. The technology combines hardware advances with software applications to allow users to perform many functions at once via software applications. The OneRadio utilizes a patent-pending, digitally based method to pick up signals across a wide stretch of frequencies and a wide range of signal strength. “We have the capability of seeing extremely weak signals in the presence of strong signals,”OneRadio CEO Mohan Vaghul said in a recent article. OneRadio is designed to do what high-end wideband receivers cannot do and at a tenth of the price. Although high-end receivers can identify weak signals, OneRadio can access signals across a wider bandwidth. “The long-term potential is pretty phenomenal,” Vaghul said in the article. For aerospace and defense purposes, one receiver could be used in place of several narrower-band receivers. The OneRadio system could monitor for malicious activities in the telecom and security fields. At last week’s conference, OneRadio conducted live demonstrations of wideband RF operations. The first-generation platform spans 2.5 GHz of bandwidth. However, the company is making strides in the development of a 7 GHz bandwidth. The development of this product comes from years of research at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering. Support for OneRadio originated from the UW's CoMotion Innovation Fund. CoMotion is dedicated to expanding the economic and societal reach of the UW community by helping innovators achieve the greatest impact from their discoveries. “CoMotion is pleased to have worked with this team over the past two years to help commercialize this complex technology by working with them on licensing, patent filings, marketing and business development,” said Vikram Jandhyala, executive director of CoMotion and UW’s vice president for innovation strategy, in the article.

---

Information for this release was adapted from a recent article in GeekWire.

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These cross-disciplinary innovators work together to advance space science and technology. Electrical Engineering Professor John Sahr was appointed as the University of Washington (UW) representative; he will begin on April 1. UW Provost Gerald Baldasty recommended Sahr as the new appointee due to Sahr’s long-term expertise in space sciences and engineering and knowledge of the UW’s role in these areas. In addition to his professorship in electrical engineering, Sahr also has adjunct appointments in earth and space sciences and aeronautics and astronautics. Sahr’s research primarily focuses on VHF radar remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Throughout his time at the UW, Sahr has led many committees and groups and received several top awards, including the NSF’s National Young Investigator Award and the Henry Booker Fellowship. [post_title] => Professor John Sahr Appointed USRA Representative [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-john-sahr-appointed-usra-representative [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-08 15:38:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-08 23:38:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=10125 [menu_order] => 68 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1443 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2015-12-08 00:05:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-08 00:05:35 [post_content] => Professor John Sahr and Affiliate Faculty Member Tony Goodson have received CoMotion Innovation Funding to support their collaborative “OneRadio” project. CoMotion Innovation Funding supports projects that are in the early stages of development and have a strong likelihood of being commercialized. The basic concept behind OneRadio is to create a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions. Traditional analog radios employ a 100-year-old analog design that focuses on one frequency at a time. Since each radio function is associated with a frequency, users that perform several functions at a time, such as airlines, must utilize multiple radios. A Boeing 747, for example, carries as many as 30 radios on board. With OneRadio, both strong and weak signals are simultaneously digitized, creating a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions. Separate functions are enabled by simple apps that operate on the OneRadio data stream. "We're about to enter a new era in radio frequency operations, one in which the entire spectrum is digitally exposed to all users,” Tony Goodson said. “Not only will current users benefit, there are bound to be whole new applications we can't even imagine.” With the market for mobile radio continuing to grow, and annual sales between $7-10 billion, OneRadio has the potential to influence new markets. Applications include enhanced traffic monitoring, remote medical monitoring, security systems and more. [post_title] => EE Faculty's OneRadio Project Supported by Innovation Funding [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-facultys-oneradio-project-supported-by-innovation-funding [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-17 15:35:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-17 22:35:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=1443 [menu_order] => 912 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 791 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-01-20 21:01:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-20 21:01:10 [post_content] => STARSProgram Smart city leaders from around the world are gathering at UW’s Seattle campus for a two-day workshop called the “NSF Visioning Workshop on Smart and Connected Communities Research and Education” to discuss the future of smart and connected communities on January 13-14, 2016. The UW Department of Electrical Engineering is organizing and hosting the workshop, on behalf of the National Science Foundation, with the goal of facilitating dialogue between stakeholders, including municipalities, states, cities, universities, industry, federal government and private foundations. The concept of creating smart communities is emerging as a way to address a variety of problems facing both busy urban centers and rural communities. By utilizing data analytics, sensors and other technology, the goal is to overcome various challenges, such as power distribution, healthcare, transportation, air quality and access to education, shelter, water and food. “The NSF visioning workshop on smart and connected communities provides an opportunity for stakeholders to talk about these needs and identify challenges and barriers that need to be overcome, both globally and locally,” said EE Chair Radha Poovendran, who is the chair and principal investigator of the NSF visioning workshop. According to a September 2015 statement from President Barack Obama, the White House announced a new “Smart Cities” initiative that will invest more than $160 million in federal research to help communities improve services. “Every community is different, with different needs and different approaches. But communities that are making the most progress on these issues have some things in common. They don't look for a single silver bullet; instead they bring together local government and nonprofits and businesses and teachers and parents around a shared goal,” according to a statement from President Barack Obama. The NSF visioning workshop brings together 50 leaders from around the world, including leading industry representatives from Honeywell and Amazon, to discuss and define a vision for smart and connected communities. Presentations and discussions highlight a variety of smart community topics, such as city planning and management, urban infrastructure and systems, emerging technologies and social, cultural and economic challenges. An international panel will also feature presentations from leaders from the Netherlands, Japan, Barcelona, China, Japan and Taiwan. Local speakers include Seattle's Chief Technology Officer Michael Mattmiller, who will be speaking about data-driven city management, and Leonard Forsman from the Suquamish Tribe, who will discuss the tribal community’s perspective on smart cities development. A leader in emerging smart community technologies, the UW Department of Electrical Engineering has many faculty researching various components of smart communities, from power systems to transportation to the Internet of Things. UW is also well represented by the newUrban@UW collaboration, led by Associate Professor Thaisa Way, from the UW College of Built Environments, who is an active participant in the NSF visioning workshop. On the founding committee of Urban@UW, Bill Howe, who is the Associate Director and Senior Data Science Fellow for the eScience Institute, is also working to develop smart community programs. A binational smart communities agreement was signed in September 2015 by EE Chair Radha Poovendran, UW Dean of Engineering Mike Bragg, UW President Ana Mari Cauce, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) President Zhang Jie, SJTU CSE Department Chair Guo Minyi and SJTU Research Dean Hui Liu. The agreement formalized the commitment of both universities to work together on smart cities research, teaching and collaboration, with the potential to establish an International Joint Research Lab to develop smart cities technology. See Also: [post_title] => Leaders Gather at UW to Define Vision for Smart Communities [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => leaders-gather-at-uw-to-define-vision-for-smart-communities [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-22 22:15:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-22 22:15:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=791 [menu_order] => 918 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 784 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-01-15 00:23:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-01-15 00:23:41 [post_content] => johnsahr_000 Anantram chrisrudell xiaodonghe2 Out of eight newly elected 2016 IEEE Seattle Section Officers, four are UW EE faculty members. Congratulations to Professors John Sahr, M.P. Anantram, Chris Rudell and Affiliate Faculty Member Xiaodong He. The new officers were sworn in on January 12, 2016. More details about each faculty member and their IEEE position are provided below: Professor John Sahr Chapter Chair of Education Professor John Sahr specializes in radar remote sensing of the ionosphere. He and his students developed the first passive bistatic VHF radar for E-region turbulence in 1998, and continue that work today. At the UW, Sahr has served seven years as Associate Dean of Undergraduate Academic Affairs for the entire campus. In this role he acted as the Provost’s representative to Washington State committees that coordinated transfer policy among 2- and 4-year colleges, public and private. He also served 2.5 years as the interim director of the Robinson Center for Young Scholars, the UW’s early entrance program. In 2014, Sahr also served as the Interim Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Professor M.P. Anantram Chapter Chair of Antennas and Propagation/Electron Devices/Microwave Theory Professor M.P. Anantram’s group works on the theory and modeling of nanoscale electronic devices and materials. The current focus is multi-scale modeling of phase change and resistive memory devices, modeling of electron transport in DNA, fast algorithms to calculate Gless and their application to model devices based on two dimensional materials such as graphene and boron nitride. Anantram's prior research included the modeling of nanoscale transistors and carbon nanotube devices. He worked at the NASA Ames Research Center and the University of Waterloo before joining UW. Professor Chris Rudell Chapter Chair of Circuits and Systems Professor Chris Rudell joined the EE department as an Assistant Professor in January 2009. Prior to joining UW EE he was an IC Designer and Project Manager with Delco Electronics (now Delphi); a postdoctoral Researcher at the University of California at Berkeley; an Analog/RF IC Design Engineer at Berkana Wireless (now Qualcomm) in San Jose, California, and later became the Design Manager of the Advanced IC Development Group; and worked in the Advanced Radio Technology Group, at Intel, where his work focused mainly on RF transceiver circuits and systems, in advanced silicon processes. His group's research focuses on a broad range of topics related to analog, mixed-signal, RF and mm-wave circuits. Xiaodong He 2016 Chair of IEEE Seattle Section Affiliate faculty member Xiaodong He is a Senior Researcher in the Deep Learning Technology Center of Microsoft Research, in Redmond, WA. His research interests are mainly in the machine intelligence areas, including deep learning, speech, natural language, computer vision, information retrieval, and knowledge representation and management. He has received several awards including the Outstanding Paper Award of ACL 2015. He is a frequent tutorial and keynote speaker at major conferences in these areas. He and colleagues developed the MSR-NRC-SRI entry and the MSR entry that won No. 1 in the 2008 NIST Machine Translation Evaluation and the 2011 IWSLT Evaluation (Chinese-to-English), respectively, and the MSR image captioning system that won the 1st Prize at the MS COCO Captioning Challenge 2015. [post_title] => Four EE Faculty Elected IEEE Seattle Chapter Officers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => four-ee-faculty-elected-ieee-seattle-chapter-officers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-23 16:36:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-23 23:36:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=784 [menu_order] => 921 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 761 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-03-10 20:37:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-10 20:37:43 [post_content] => STARSProgram Professors John Sahr and Linda Bushnell were the stars of the show at a recent information session for students in January 2016. The information session was specifically for students enrolled in the Washington STate Academic RedShirt (STARS) in Engineering Program, which supports incoming freshmen who are interested in pursuing an engineering degree and who are from economically and educationally underserved backgrounds. At the information session, Sahr and Bushnell spoke about their experiences working, teaching and conducting research in electrical engineering. Five electrical engineering students also shared their experiences, from academics to research to internships. With engineering programs having among the most challenging curricula, STARS is designed to help students build the necessary skills and support systems to successfully navigate the challenges they encounter while completing an engineering degree. During their first two years of college, participants receive a specialized curriculum designed to prepare them to pursue an engineering major. As part of the program, they are guaranteed acceptance into one of the UW’s 10 engineering programs. Last year, STARS students had a cumulative GPA that was, on average, 0.33 higher than their non-STARS peers. The STARS program, which was founded in 2013, is an initiative led by EE Professor Eve Riskin, Associate Dean of Diversity and Access. A National Science Foundation grant was secured to start the program. [post_title] => EE Professors Share Experiences with STARS Students [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-professors-share-experiences-with-stars-students [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-04-22 22:16:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-04-22 22:16:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=761 [menu_order] => 926 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10656 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-05-17 15:59:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-17 22:59:36 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_1278" align="alignleft" width="168"] Professor John Sahr[/caption] OneRadio, founded by Professor John Sahr and Affiliate Professor Tony Goodson, demonstrated its wideband radio receiver platform at last week's IEEE Radar Conference in Seattle. The startup was developed by Sahr and Goodson to create a single radio that is capable of performing multiple functions simultaneously. The technology combines hardware advances with software applications to allow users to perform many functions at once via software applications. The OneRadio utilizes a patent-pending, digitally based method to pick up signals across a wide stretch of frequencies and a wide range of signal strength. “We have the capability of seeing extremely weak signals in the presence of strong signals,”OneRadio CEO Mohan Vaghul said in a recent article. OneRadio is designed to do what high-end wideband receivers cannot do and at a tenth of the price. Although high-end receivers can identify weak signals, OneRadio can access signals across a wider bandwidth. “The long-term potential is pretty phenomenal,” Vaghul said in the article. For aerospace and defense purposes, one receiver could be used in place of several narrower-band receivers. The OneRadio system could monitor for malicious activities in the telecom and security fields. At last week’s conference, OneRadio conducted live demonstrations of wideband RF operations. The first-generation platform spans 2.5 GHz of bandwidth. However, the company is making strides in the development of a 7 GHz bandwidth. The development of this product comes from years of research at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering. Support for OneRadio originated from the UW's CoMotion Innovation Fund. CoMotion is dedicated to expanding the economic and societal reach of the UW community by helping innovators achieve the greatest impact from their discoveries. “CoMotion is pleased to have worked with this team over the past two years to help commercialize this complex technology by working with them on licensing, patent filings, marketing and business development,” said Vikram Jandhyala, executive director of CoMotion and UW’s vice president for innovation strategy, in the article.

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Information for this release was adapted from a recent article in GeekWire.

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Associated Labs

Research Areas

Innovation/Entrepreneurship

Education

  • Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, 1990
    Cornell University
  • B.S., Electrical Engineering (with honor), 1984
    California Institute of Technology