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Sumit Roy

  • Professor

Sumit Roy has been a faculty member in Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington since 1998, where he is presently Integrated Systems Professor. He spent 2001-03 on academic leave at Intel Wireless Technology Lab as a Senior Researcher engaged in systems architecture and standards development for ultra-wideband systems (Wireless PANs) and next generation high-speed wireless LANs. During January-July 2008, he was the Science Foundation of Ireland’s E.T.S. Walton Awardee for a sabbatical at University College, Dublin, and during summer 2011 he was the recipient of a Royal Academy of Engineering (UK) Distinguished Visiting Fellowship

Roy’s activities for the IEEE Communications Society (ComSoc) include membership of several technical and conference program committees, notably the Technical Committee on Cognitive Networks. He has served as Associate Editor for all the major ComSoc publications in his area at various times, including the IEEE Transactions on Communications and IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, and as a Distinguished Lecturer (2014-15) for ComSoc. He was elevated to IEEE Fellow by ComSoc in 2007 for “contributions to multi-user communications theory and cross-layer design of wireless networking standards.”

Research Interests

Wireless communications/networking; emerging applications (smart grid, vehicular networks, cognitive and sensor networks).

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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10871" align="alignleft" width="456"] CMMB Vision Vice-Chairman and CTO Hui Liu, UW EE Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran, Dean Michael Bragg and CMMB Vision President and CEO Charles Wong[/caption]

The CMMB Vision-UW EE Center on Satellite Multimedia and Connected Vehicles was created to foster the research to advance satellite networking, multimedia, smart connected vehicles and artificial intelligence/machine learning technologies. CMMB Vision (CMMB) awarded the UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering a $1.5 million gift to build the new research center. The partnership forges cutting-edge solutions that enable the delivery of information to people around the world at unprecedented speed, scale, and low cost, building the next-generation of smart cars and ubiquitous connectivity.

“We picked a vehicle, because it is simply a smart phone on wheels,” CMMB President and CEO Charles Wong said. “It is a mobile device in itself. It allows for the most mobility and ubiquity, which cannot be accommodated by the existing cellular network.”

As self-driving cars become more of a reality, CMMB focuses on delivering data to the vehicles with unprecedented speed, scale, low-cost and universal connectivity. The company uses next-generation satellite and broadcast technologies to deliver the broadband data, multimedia data and big data to vehicles and mobile devices. The company focuses on delivering this data with unprecedented speed, scale, low-cost and universal connectivity.

[caption id="attachment_11499" align="alignright" width="171"] Professor Sumit Roy[/caption]

“We’ve expanded satellite broadcasting from radio to video and Internet data,” Mr. Wong said. “Our technology is global. We have two satellites – one over Asia and one over the Middle East and Africa. From Asia to Africa, we cover 6 billion people and over 143 countries.”

Many developing nations do not have the infrastructure to support current broadcasting technologies. According to Mr. Wong, mobile devices can become that less expensive option to connect resource-poor communities.

“The whole world can eventually be quite well connected,” Mr. Wong said. “One of the most important factors that this technology supports in developing nations is education. It allows for students to have access to teaching resources.“

The center launches at a time when smart cities research is flourishing. In Fall 2015, UW EE signed a “Smart Cities” agreement with leaders from the School of Electrical Information and Electrical Engineering at Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). The agreement formalized the commitment of both universities to work together on smart cities research, teaching and collaboration. Within the past year, UW EE researchers have promoted the development of smart cities around the country through the development of smart posters and clothing, the redesign of spectrum wireless usage and the tackling of urban mobility challenges in the Cities of Seattle and Nashville.

[caption id="attachment_2307" align="alignleft" width="182"] Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang[/caption]

“UW EE is dedicated to the advancement of smart cities,” UW EE Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran said. “This partnership with CMMB further advances this mission and will foster impact on a global level.”

Professor Sumit Roy serves as the Executive Director for the CMMB-UW EE Center and also leads the Satellite Networking thrust. A second thrust on Multimedia Vehicular Systems is also underway under the direction of Prof. Jenq-Neng Hwang. Dr. Guanbin Xing, a UW EE alum, has been appointed as a Research Scientist to support the centers R&D missions.
                    [post_title] => New CMMB-UW EE Center on Satellite Multimedia and Connected Vehicles launches
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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11310" align="alignleft" width="530"] From left: Dean Michael Bragg, Dr. Uday Desai, Vice-Provost Jeff Reidinger and Professor Sumit Roy.[/caption]

Although the India Institute of Technology - Hyderabad (IITH) and the University  of Washington (UW) are over 7,700 miles away, research interests draw the two institutions closer together.

In May, IITH and the UW Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (UW ECE) joined forces through a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), fostering a partnership on Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) and Smart Cities.As Director of the India Institute of Technology - Hyderabad (IITH), Dr. Uday Desai has a passion for education and research. In particular, his research focuses on Smart Cities, cyber security and Internet of Things (IoT) for smart health care.

Past collaborations and experience in the field drew him to UW ECE as a potential collaborator. Within the last few years, UW ECE has elevated its strong smart cities reseearch through a new collaboration with the Cities of Seattle and Nashville and a new center on smart, connected communities. UW researchers as a collective are partnering more than ever before on making urban spaces less congested and more eco-friendly.

A new UW-housed collective, Urban@UW, works with scholars, policymakers and community stakeholders to develop cross-disciplinary and cross-sector collaborative research. As a hub for innovation and as a space betrothed by urban conditions, Seattle is a hotbed for this research.

However, it’s not just Seattle that is honing in on this research. Cities in India are innovating around technology and data-collection in ways that will be important for learning and developing best practices and implementation, as well.

A partnership between IITH and UW ECE offers immense opportunities to develop this research for future impact - from India to the United States, with thousands of cities in between.

By offering opportunities in smart city research and urban scholarship, this collaboration builds student experience and student commitment to societal issues.  When equipped with the top researchers and educators, the future of cities looks bright.

[post_title] => An MoU between IITH and the UW build a partnership on cyber physical systems, smart cities [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => an-mou-between-iith-and-the-uw-build-a-partnership-on-cyber-physical-systems-smart-cities [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-11 15:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-11 22:43:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11309 [menu_order] => 21 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11292 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-07 11:23:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-07 18:23:27 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11291" align="alignleft" width="300"] Sumit Roy, professor of electrical engineering, is a wireless communications/networking expert who has been a long-term contributor to the ns-3 project.[/caption] The paper, entitled “Link-to-System Mapping for ns-3 Wi-Fi OFDM Error Models,” was awarded the top paper prize at the annual WNS3 Workshop. The paper investigates Wi-Fi OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) performance over AWGN (additive white Gaussian noise) and fading channels, developing an ns-3 ErrorRateModel based on tables compiled from link simulation results. This research allows others to reproduce and extend the basic tables for future implementation. This is a reflection of quiet, but consistent work at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering (UW EE) on ns-3, including core simulator architecture as well as new and refined user modules. Authors on the paper include lead author Rohan Patidar, UW EE Professor Sumit Roy, UW EE Affiliate Professor Thomas Henderson and Amrutha Chandramohan. [post_title] => Professor Sumit Roy receives Best Paper at 2017 WNS3 Workshop [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sumit-roy-2017-wns3-best-paper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-07 11:25:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-07 18:25:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11292 [menu_order] => 22 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11018 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-14 10:51:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-14 17:51:28 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11019" align="alignleft" width="385"] Professors Sumit Roy and Tom Henderson[/caption] The University of Washington (UW) is one of 19 universities awarded the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) grant to develop performance analysis tools for the proposed next-generation broadband LTE based FirstNet (for emergency/first responders). The grant is part of the First Responders Network Authority (FirstNet) appropriations. Congress has allocated FirstNet 20 MHz of spectrum in 700 MHz band and up to $7 billion in funding for the construction of a nationwide network (awarded to AT&T in a public-private partnership model), achieving a major recommendation post 9/11 for a single interoperable platform with the requisite capacity for new features. These features integrate new data, voice and location-based services. “UW EE is in a unique position to offer support to these efforts due to the department’s key long-standing role in developing the network simulator ns-3,” UW electrical engineering (UW EE) Professor and PI on the grant Sumit Roy said. [caption id="attachment_1281" align="alignright" width="189"] Professor Jim Ritcey[/caption] The proposed analytical studies will initially focus on benchmarking currently used by P-25 digital Land Mobile Radio (LMR) systems intended for primarily voice communications. UW EE researchers will identify a set of emergency scenarios and create corresponding traffic (demand) models for analyzing the next-generation of LTE-based public safety network architecture. This research presents an opportunity for UW EE to partner with the City of Seattle CIO’s office to analyze the city’s emergency response units current operations and prospects for broadband LTE adoption. “A key component of our proposal is the engagement with the local First Responder community,” Roy said. “Currently, there is a lack of more fine-grained demand models for both a daily routine basis as well as when emergencies at various scales and types occur, such as fire, significant traffic, other incidents or a natural disaster; it would help answer key questions, like availability and performance of public safety (PS) networks in such `stressed’ scenarios. As a cornerstone of our proposed effort, our work would greatly benefit from the availability of local data (from City or County Police/Fire/EMT) to refine and tune our models. In turn, we could then conduct techno-economic studies that highlight cost-benefit considerations for broadband LTE adoption for PS and assist the City and State with inputs or recommendations during the next stage of policymaking in this regard.” Co-PIs on the two-year grant, entitled “Modeling, Simulation and Performance Evaluation for Future Public Safety Communications Networks,” include UW EE Professor Jim Ritcey and Affiliate Professor Tom Henderson. [post_title] => UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ee-leads-nist-pscr-grant-for-next-generation-broadband [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-27 16:31:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-27 23:31:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11018 [menu_order] => 35 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7787 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2016-10-20 10:43:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-20 17:43:58 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_7788" align="alignleft" width="209"]Professor Sumit Roy leads the Spectrum research. Professor Sumit Roy leads the Spectrum research.[/caption]   On top of Sieg Hall, Electrical Engineering Professor Sumit Roy and his students have placed a commodity RF sensor station, which is capable of passively monitoring spectrum usage of over 300 MHz-6 GHz band (ultra-high frequency) occurring in the local vicinity. The integrated web interface currently allows remote users to access the data gathered by the sensors and stored on a public cloud service. Many of the sensors will be deployed in various metro areas in the country. Roy developed the Spectrum monitoring system under an Early Concept Grant for Exploratory Research, which is based on a broader $400 million National Science Foundation’s (NSF) initiative to boost advanced wireless research. A key objective is more efficient reuse of scarce spectrum resources. Obtaining this objective relies on products that generate very large quantities of data. The data will be made publicly available to the R&D community interested in spectrum engineering for subsequent analysis, with the possibility of providing data-driven inputs for future spectrum policy. “Given that supply of usable spectrum is increasing very slowly, relative to burgeoning demand (which is driven by all the bandwidth-hungry devices and apps, as well the increasing number of new consumers beginning to use data services on networks worldwide in developing nations), there is a great and urgent need for such refined policymaking,” Roy said. “A reasonable analogy is the scarcity of land in Manhattan. You can make Manhattan bigger; but only at great cost. Instead, a smarter initial starting point is to make better use of available land.” Since spectrum use – like land – is divided into broadly civilian (cellular networks and unlicensed technologies, like Wi-Fi] and non-civilian (all the networks owned by the federal government) uses, a key policy question is how to apportion spectrum use into these two classes. In this sense, a few very interesting policy versus technology questions have come to the forefront in recent years concerning spectrum usage. One question is what to do when it is determined that a “private” owner of some piece of spectrum (i.e. one with an exclusive license for its use) under-utilizes this scarce resource. Increasingly, there is a trend in policy circles to encourage sharing in such circumstances. “Sharing would allow the licensee to keep its rights to the spectrum, but it would be obligated to ‘lease’ it temporarily to another network (under appropriate rules for sharing that includes protection for the licensee’s operations).” Roy said. “Overall, this leads to much more efficient use of spectrum, and that is what my research – including developing of the Spectrum Monitoring system – is broadly focused on. Through these efforts, we are placing Seattle at the forefront of the Smart Spectrum City prototype and providing a model for other cities to follow.” [caption id="attachment_7790" align="alignright" width="285"]The RF sensor station on the top of Sieg Hall at the University of Washington, Seattle. The RF sensor station on the top of Sieg Hall at the University of Washington, Seattle.[/caption] Broadband Access & Public Services in the Internet Era Broadband access is often used as a socio-economic metric in this Internet Age. Nations continue to be ranked on the broadband scale. While this greatly affects economic progress for developing economies looking to integrate with global markets and supply chains, it is also impacts developed market-driven societies as well. “In the U.S., the percent of households with broadband internet connection is upward of 80 percent,” Roy said. “However, this access is geographically concentrated. Reliable access largely exists in dense urban areas where the Internet service providers can turn a profit, but many low density areas (rural or otherwise limited by geographic factors) are poorly served.” The limited lack of broadband access in these areas restricts the effective delivery of public services that require a mature, robust and ubiquitous telecommunication network (i.e., better education and healthcare), thus reducing economic development and self-empowerment. A significant gap is the absence of a unified public safety/emergency response network. Cheri Marusa is the President and Founder of Life Support, a nonprofit focused on improving medical services in Upper Kittitas County. She has worked with the Washington State House of Representatives for four years to advance policy work dedicated to broadband coverage. “My concern and passion is for public safety,” Marusa said. “This encompasses: an individual calling 911, first responders arriving at an emergency scene, law enforcement coverage, the management of wild land fires and the access of telemedicine. I advocate for critical access to communication and enhanced technology. Because spectrum is a finite resource, the communications sector and legislative policy have to focus on identifying opportunities to make both commercial and federal Spectrum use more efficient.” From a policy perspective, what should communities have access to at a base level? Spectrum sharing will allow for more efficient use of the resource, but for a deeply Internet-dependent society, the concept of baseline is not easily identifiable. “We need to ask ourselves,” Roy said. “What are the basic things we should have access to that should be provided as a public good?” [post_title] => Professor Roy Leads Spectrum Research [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-roy-leads-spectrum-research-to-enhance-broadband-access [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-01 15:35:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-01 22:35:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=7787 [menu_order] => 136 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1510 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-03-17 00:37:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-17 00:37:37 [post_content] => SumitRoy2_000Thanks to a new NSF Science Across Virtual Institutes (SAVI) grant, EE Professor Sumit Roy will work with researchers from the United States and South Africa with the goal of bringing reliable, low-cost wireless broadband access to traditionally underserved areas. This is a pressing topic of importance for both countries. As part of the NSF grant, a virtual institute called the Institute for Cognitive Networking (iCON) will be established to bring together a consortium of researchers from the United States and South Africa. In addition to UW, participating organizations include the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey and the University of Pretoria in South Africa. Researchers will investigate the potential to utilize wireless spectrum white spaces, which are unlicensed frequencies that are available for use in certain areas, to bring low-cost reliable wireless broadband access to underserved areas. The virtual institute is intended to support long-term international collaboration between the United States and South Africa, with the goal of accelerating wireless access research. A number of shared resources will be provided, including online resources, physical and virtual meetings, summer school and a graduate student exchange program. The virtual institute will also provide a mechanism to archive research, enabling future projects to build upon current and past research. 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id="attachment_10871" align="alignleft" width="456"] CMMB Vision Vice-Chairman and CTO Hui Liu, UW EE Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran, Dean Michael Bragg and CMMB Vision President and CEO Charles Wong[/caption] The CMMB Vision-UW EE Center on Satellite Multimedia and Connected Vehicles was created to foster the research to advance satellite networking, multimedia, smart connected vehicles and artificial intelligence/machine learning technologies. CMMB Vision (CMMB) awarded the UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering a $1.5 million gift to build the new research center. The partnership forges cutting-edge solutions that enable the delivery of information to people around the world at unprecedented speed, scale, and low cost, building the next-generation of smart cars and ubiquitous connectivity. “We picked a vehicle, because it is simply a smart phone on wheels,” CMMB President and CEO Charles Wong said. “It is a mobile device in itself. It allows for the most mobility and ubiquity, which cannot be accommodated by the existing cellular network.” As self-driving cars become more of a reality, CMMB focuses on delivering data to the vehicles with unprecedented speed, scale, low-cost and universal connectivity. The company uses next-generation satellite and broadcast technologies to deliver the broadband data, multimedia data and big data to vehicles and mobile devices. The company focuses on delivering this data with unprecedented speed, scale, low-cost and universal connectivity. [caption id="attachment_11499" align="alignright" width="171"] Professor Sumit Roy[/caption] “We’ve expanded satellite broadcasting from radio to video and Internet data,” Mr. Wong said. “Our technology is global. We have two satellites – one over Asia and one over the Middle East and Africa. From Asia to Africa, we cover 6 billion people and over 143 countries.” Many developing nations do not have the infrastructure to support current broadcasting technologies. According to Mr. Wong, mobile devices can become that less expensive option to connect resource-poor communities. “The whole world can eventually be quite well connected,” Mr. Wong said. “One of the most important factors that this technology supports in developing nations is education. It allows for students to have access to teaching resources.“ The center launches at a time when smart cities research is flourishing. In Fall 2015, UW EE signed a “Smart Cities” agreement with leaders from the School of Electrical Information and Electrical Engineering at Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). The agreement formalized the commitment of both universities to work together on smart cities research, teaching and collaboration. Within the past year, UW EE researchers have promoted the development of smart cities around the country through the development of smart posters and clothing, the redesign of spectrum wireless usage and the tackling of urban mobility challenges in the Cities of Seattle and Nashville. [caption id="attachment_2307" align="alignleft" width="182"] Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang[/caption] “UW EE is dedicated to the advancement of smart cities,” UW EE Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran said. “This partnership with CMMB further advances this mission and will foster impact on a global level.” Professor Sumit Roy serves as the Executive Director for the CMMB-UW EE Center and also leads the Satellite Networking thrust. A second thrust on Multimedia Vehicular Systems is also underway under the direction of Prof. Jenq-Neng Hwang. Dr. Guanbin Xing, a UW EE alum, has been appointed as a Research Scientist to support the centers R&D missions. [post_title] => New CMMB-UW EE Center on Satellite Multimedia and Connected Vehicles launches [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => new-cmmb-uw-ee-center-on-satellite-multimedia-and-connected-vehicles-launches [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-29 13:53:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-29 20:53:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11498 [menu_order] => 12 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11309 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-11 15:43:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-11 22:43:21 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11310" align="alignleft" width="530"] From left: Dean Michael Bragg, Dr. Uday Desai, Vice-Provost Jeff Reidinger and Professor Sumit Roy.[/caption]

Although the India Institute of Technology - Hyderabad (IITH) and the University  of Washington (UW) are over 7,700 miles away, research interests draw the two institutions closer together.

In May, IITH and the UW Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (UW ECE) joined forces through a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), fostering a partnership on Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) and Smart Cities.As Director of the India Institute of Technology - Hyderabad (IITH), Dr. Uday Desai has a passion for education and research. In particular, his research focuses on Smart Cities, cyber security and Internet of Things (IoT) for smart health care.

Past collaborations and experience in the field drew him to UW ECE as a potential collaborator. Within the last few years, UW ECE has elevated its strong smart cities reseearch through a new collaboration with the Cities of Seattle and Nashville and a new center on smart, connected communities. UW researchers as a collective are partnering more than ever before on making urban spaces less congested and more eco-friendly.

A new UW-housed collective, Urban@UW, works with scholars, policymakers and community stakeholders to develop cross-disciplinary and cross-sector collaborative research. As a hub for innovation and as a space betrothed by urban conditions, Seattle is a hotbed for this research.

However, it’s not just Seattle that is honing in on this research. Cities in India are innovating around technology and data-collection in ways that will be important for learning and developing best practices and implementation, as well.

A partnership between IITH and UW ECE offers immense opportunities to develop this research for future impact - from India to the United States, with thousands of cities in between.

By offering opportunities in smart city research and urban scholarship, this collaboration builds student experience and student commitment to societal issues.  When equipped with the top researchers and educators, the future of cities looks bright.

[post_title] => An MoU between IITH and the UW build a partnership on cyber physical systems, smart cities [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => an-mou-between-iith-and-the-uw-build-a-partnership-on-cyber-physical-systems-smart-cities [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-11 15:43:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-11 22:43:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11309 [menu_order] => 21 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11292 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-07 11:23:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-07 18:23:27 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11291" align="alignleft" width="300"] Sumit Roy, professor of electrical engineering, is a wireless communications/networking expert who has been a long-term contributor to the ns-3 project.[/caption] The paper, entitled “Link-to-System Mapping for ns-3 Wi-Fi OFDM Error Models,” was awarded the top paper prize at the annual WNS3 Workshop. The paper investigates Wi-Fi OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) performance over AWGN (additive white Gaussian noise) and fading channels, developing an ns-3 ErrorRateModel based on tables compiled from link simulation results. This research allows others to reproduce and extend the basic tables for future implementation. This is a reflection of quiet, but consistent work at the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering (UW EE) on ns-3, including core simulator architecture as well as new and refined user modules. Authors on the paper include lead author Rohan Patidar, UW EE Professor Sumit Roy, UW EE Affiliate Professor Thomas Henderson and Amrutha Chandramohan. [post_title] => Professor Sumit Roy receives Best Paper at 2017 WNS3 Workshop [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sumit-roy-2017-wns3-best-paper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-07 11:25:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-07 18:25:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11292 [menu_order] => 22 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11018 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-14 10:51:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-14 17:51:28 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_11019" align="alignleft" width="385"] Professors Sumit Roy and Tom Henderson[/caption] The University of Washington (UW) is one of 19 universities awarded the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Public Safety Communications Research (PSCR) grant to develop performance analysis tools for the proposed next-generation broadband LTE based FirstNet (for emergency/first responders). The grant is part of the First Responders Network Authority (FirstNet) appropriations. Congress has allocated FirstNet 20 MHz of spectrum in 700 MHz band and up to $7 billion in funding for the construction of a nationwide network (awarded to AT&T in a public-private partnership model), achieving a major recommendation post 9/11 for a single interoperable platform with the requisite capacity for new features. These features integrate new data, voice and location-based services. “UW EE is in a unique position to offer support to these efforts due to the department’s key long-standing role in developing the network simulator ns-3,” UW electrical engineering (UW EE) Professor and PI on the grant Sumit Roy said. [caption id="attachment_1281" align="alignright" width="189"] Professor Jim Ritcey[/caption] The proposed analytical studies will initially focus on benchmarking currently used by P-25 digital Land Mobile Radio (LMR) systems intended for primarily voice communications. UW EE researchers will identify a set of emergency scenarios and create corresponding traffic (demand) models for analyzing the next-generation of LTE-based public safety network architecture. This research presents an opportunity for UW EE to partner with the City of Seattle CIO’s office to analyze the city’s emergency response units current operations and prospects for broadband LTE adoption. “A key component of our proposal is the engagement with the local First Responder community,” Roy said. “Currently, there is a lack of more fine-grained demand models for both a daily routine basis as well as when emergencies at various scales and types occur, such as fire, significant traffic, other incidents or a natural disaster; it would help answer key questions, like availability and performance of public safety (PS) networks in such `stressed’ scenarios. As a cornerstone of our proposed effort, our work would greatly benefit from the availability of local data (from City or County Police/Fire/EMT) to refine and tune our models. In turn, we could then conduct techno-economic studies that highlight cost-benefit considerations for broadband LTE adoption for PS and assist the City and State with inputs or recommendations during the next stage of policymaking in this regard.” Co-PIs on the two-year grant, entitled “Modeling, Simulation and Performance Evaluation for Future Public Safety Communications Networks,” include UW EE Professor Jim Ritcey and Affiliate Professor Tom Henderson. [post_title] => UW EE leads NIST PSCR grant for next-generation broadband [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ee-leads-nist-pscr-grant-for-next-generation-broadband [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-27 16:31:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-27 23:31:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=11018 [menu_order] => 35 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7787 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2016-10-20 10:43:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-20 17:43:58 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_7788" align="alignleft" width="209"]Professor Sumit Roy leads the Spectrum research. Professor Sumit Roy leads the Spectrum research.[/caption]   On top of Sieg Hall, Electrical Engineering Professor Sumit Roy and his students have placed a commodity RF sensor station, which is capable of passively monitoring spectrum usage of over 300 MHz-6 GHz band (ultra-high frequency) occurring in the local vicinity. The integrated web interface currently allows remote users to access the data gathered by the sensors and stored on a public cloud service. Many of the sensors will be deployed in various metro areas in the country. Roy developed the Spectrum monitoring system under an Early Concept Grant for Exploratory Research, which is based on a broader $400 million National Science Foundation’s (NSF) initiative to boost advanced wireless research. A key objective is more efficient reuse of scarce spectrum resources. Obtaining this objective relies on products that generate very large quantities of data. The data will be made publicly available to the R&D community interested in spectrum engineering for subsequent analysis, with the possibility of providing data-driven inputs for future spectrum policy. “Given that supply of usable spectrum is increasing very slowly, relative to burgeoning demand (which is driven by all the bandwidth-hungry devices and apps, as well the increasing number of new consumers beginning to use data services on networks worldwide in developing nations), there is a great and urgent need for such refined policymaking,” Roy said. “A reasonable analogy is the scarcity of land in Manhattan. You can make Manhattan bigger; but only at great cost. Instead, a smarter initial starting point is to make better use of available land.” Since spectrum use – like land – is divided into broadly civilian (cellular networks and unlicensed technologies, like Wi-Fi] and non-civilian (all the networks owned by the federal government) uses, a key policy question is how to apportion spectrum use into these two classes. In this sense, a few very interesting policy versus technology questions have come to the forefront in recent years concerning spectrum usage. One question is what to do when it is determined that a “private” owner of some piece of spectrum (i.e. one with an exclusive license for its use) under-utilizes this scarce resource. Increasingly, there is a trend in policy circles to encourage sharing in such circumstances. “Sharing would allow the licensee to keep its rights to the spectrum, but it would be obligated to ‘lease’ it temporarily to another network (under appropriate rules for sharing that includes protection for the licensee’s operations).” Roy said. “Overall, this leads to much more efficient use of spectrum, and that is what my research – including developing of the Spectrum Monitoring system – is broadly focused on. Through these efforts, we are placing Seattle at the forefront of the Smart Spectrum City prototype and providing a model for other cities to follow.” [caption id="attachment_7790" align="alignright" width="285"]The RF sensor station on the top of Sieg Hall at the University of Washington, Seattle. The RF sensor station on the top of Sieg Hall at the University of Washington, Seattle.[/caption] Broadband Access & Public Services in the Internet Era Broadband access is often used as a socio-economic metric in this Internet Age. Nations continue to be ranked on the broadband scale. While this greatly affects economic progress for developing economies looking to integrate with global markets and supply chains, it is also impacts developed market-driven societies as well. “In the U.S., the percent of households with broadband internet connection is upward of 80 percent,” Roy said. “However, this access is geographically concentrated. Reliable access largely exists in dense urban areas where the Internet service providers can turn a profit, but many low density areas (rural or otherwise limited by geographic factors) are poorly served.” The limited lack of broadband access in these areas restricts the effective delivery of public services that require a mature, robust and ubiquitous telecommunication network (i.e., better education and healthcare), thus reducing economic development and self-empowerment. A significant gap is the absence of a unified public safety/emergency response network. Cheri Marusa is the President and Founder of Life Support, a nonprofit focused on improving medical services in Upper Kittitas County. She has worked with the Washington State House of Representatives for four years to advance policy work dedicated to broadband coverage. “My concern and passion is for public safety,” Marusa said. “This encompasses: an individual calling 911, first responders arriving at an emergency scene, law enforcement coverage, the management of wild land fires and the access of telemedicine. I advocate for critical access to communication and enhanced technology. Because spectrum is a finite resource, the communications sector and legislative policy have to focus on identifying opportunities to make both commercial and federal Spectrum use more efficient.” From a policy perspective, what should communities have access to at a base level? Spectrum sharing will allow for more efficient use of the resource, but for a deeply Internet-dependent society, the concept of baseline is not easily identifiable. “We need to ask ourselves,” Roy said. “What are the basic things we should have access to that should be provided as a public good?” [post_title] => Professor Roy Leads Spectrum Research [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professor-roy-leads-spectrum-research-to-enhance-broadband-access [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-01 15:35:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-01 22:35:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=7787 [menu_order] => 136 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1510 [post_author] => 15 [post_date] => 2016-03-17 00:37:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-17 00:37:37 [post_content] => SumitRoy2_000Thanks to a new NSF Science Across Virtual Institutes (SAVI) grant, EE Professor Sumit Roy will work with researchers from the United States and South Africa with the goal of bringing reliable, low-cost wireless broadband access to traditionally underserved areas. This is a pressing topic of importance for both countries. As part of the NSF grant, a virtual institute called the Institute for Cognitive Networking (iCON) will be established to bring together a consortium of researchers from the United States and South Africa. In addition to UW, participating organizations include the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey and the University of Pretoria in South Africa. Researchers will investigate the potential to utilize wireless spectrum white spaces, which are unlicensed frequencies that are available for use in certain areas, to bring low-cost reliable wireless broadband access to underserved areas. The virtual institute is intended to support long-term international collaboration between the United States and South Africa, with the goal of accelerating wireless access research. A number of shared resources will be provided, including online resources, physical and virtual meetings, summer school and a graduate student exchange program. The virtual institute will also provide a mechanism to archive research, enabling future projects to build upon current and past research. [post_title] => With NSF Grant, Sumit Roy Investigates Wireless Broadband Access for Underserved Areas [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => with-nsf-grant-sumit-roy-investigates-wireless-broadband-access-for-underserved-areas [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-01 15:36:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-01 22:36:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://hedy.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=1510 [menu_order] => 914 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11498 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-29 13:53:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-29 20:53:34 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_10871" align="alignleft" width="456"] CMMB Vision Vice-Chairman and CTO Hui Liu, UW EE Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran, Dean Michael Bragg and CMMB Vision President and CEO Charles Wong[/caption] The CMMB Vision-UW EE Center on Satellite Multimedia and Connected Vehicles was created to foster the research to advance satellite networking, multimedia, smart connected vehicles and artificial intelligence/machine learning technologies. CMMB Vision (CMMB) awarded the UW Dept. of Electrical Engineering a $1.5 million gift to build the new research center. The partnership forges cutting-edge solutions that enable the delivery of information to people around the world at unprecedented speed, scale, and low cost, building the next-generation of smart cars and ubiquitous connectivity. “We picked a vehicle, because it is simply a smart phone on wheels,” CMMB President and CEO Charles Wong said. “It is a mobile device in itself. It allows for the most mobility and ubiquity, which cannot be accommodated by the existing cellular network.” As self-driving cars become more of a reality, CMMB focuses on delivering data to the vehicles with unprecedented speed, scale, low-cost and universal connectivity. The company uses next-generation satellite and broadcast technologies to deliver the broadband data, multimedia data and big data to vehicles and mobile devices. The company focuses on delivering this data with unprecedented speed, scale, low-cost and universal connectivity. [caption id="attachment_11499" align="alignright" width="171"] Professor Sumit Roy[/caption] “We’ve expanded satellite broadcasting from radio to video and Internet data,” Mr. Wong said. “Our technology is global. We have two satellites – one over Asia and one over the Middle East and Africa. From Asia to Africa, we cover 6 billion people and over 143 countries.” Many developing nations do not have the infrastructure to support current broadcasting technologies. According to Mr. Wong, mobile devices can become that less expensive option to connect resource-poor communities. “The whole world can eventually be quite well connected,” Mr. Wong said. “One of the most important factors that this technology supports in developing nations is education. It allows for students to have access to teaching resources.“ The center launches at a time when smart cities research is flourishing. In Fall 2015, UW EE signed a “Smart Cities” agreement with leaders from the School of Electrical Information and Electrical Engineering at Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). The agreement formalized the commitment of both universities to work together on smart cities research, teaching and collaboration. Within the past year, UW EE researchers have promoted the development of smart cities around the country through the development of smart posters and clothing, the redesign of spectrum wireless usage and the tackling of urban mobility challenges in the Cities of Seattle and Nashville. [caption id="attachment_2307" align="alignleft" width="182"] Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang[/caption] “UW EE is dedicated to the advancement of smart cities,” UW EE Professor and Chair Radha Poovendran said. “This partnership with CMMB further advances this mission and will foster impact on a global level.” Professor Sumit Roy serves as the Executive Director for the CMMB-UW EE Center and also leads the Satellite Networking thrust. A second thrust on Multimedia Vehicular Systems is also underway under the direction of Prof. Jenq-Neng Hwang. Dr. Guanbin Xing, a UW EE alum, has been appointed as a Research Scientist to support the centers R&D missions. 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Representative Publications

  • H-A. Safavi-Naeini, S. Roy and S. Ashrafi, ``Spectrum Sharing of Radar and Wi-Fi Networks: The Sensing/Throughput Tradeoff" IEEE Trans. Cognitive Comm. & Networking, 2016
  • F. Hessar and S. Roy, ``Spectrum Sharing between a Surveillance Radar and Secondary Wi-Fi Networks," IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electronic Systems, 2016 (to appear).
  • A. Al-Mutairi and S. Roy, ``Impact of Traffic Load on OFDMA Femtocells Interference Mitigation," IEEE J. Sel. Areas Commn, Spl. Issue on Recent Advances in Heterogeneous Cellular Networks, Oct. 2015, pp. 2017-2026.
  • F. Hessar and S. Roy, ``Capacity Considerations for Secondary Networks in TV White Space," IEEE Tran. Mobile Comput., Sep. 2015, pp. 1780-1793.
  • Y. Yang and S. Roy, ``Grouping Based MAC Protocols for EV Charging Data Transmission in Smart Metering Network," JSAC Smart Grid Communications Series, July 2014, pp. 1328
  • C. S. Boyer and S. Roy, "Backscatter Communications and RFID: Coding, Energy and MIMO Analysis," IEEE Trans. Comm., Mar. 2014, pp. 770-785
Sumit Roy Headshot
Phone206-221-5261
roy@ee.washington.edu
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Associated Labs

Research Areas

Affiliations

Education

  • Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, 1988
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • MA, Statistics, 1988
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • MS, Electrical Engineering, 1985
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • B. Tech, Electrical Engineering, 1983
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur