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OPTICAL SENSOR GROUP
Department of Electrical Engineering
University of Washington

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Development of Surface Plasmon Biosensors for Marine Applications: Sensor Platform Development and Optimization
Sponsor: National Sea Grant Office

The project aims at the development of protein-based microbiosensors for application in the marine environment. The primary thrust of the research will be to develop two fundamental signal transduction technologies that may be used to develop a broad range of sensors for detecting specific organic compounds, bacteria, viruses, and metal ions in the marine environment. One sensor system will employ chemiluminescence as a signal generation system and the other will make use of surface plasmon resonance fiber optic technology.



Advanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors
Sponsor: Center for Analytical Chemistry

This research aims at the development of novel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor systems and methodology for real-time biosensor analysis of bioanalytes. The project encompasses the development of a multichannel SPR sensor for laboratory use and the development of a portable SPR instrument for field use. In conjunction with specific bioreceptors these SPR biosensor systems will allow real-time, sensitive, and selective detection of various bioanalytes. The biosensor systems to be developed are of interest for many areas including medicine, environmental monitoring, biotechnology, drug and food monitoring.



Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Platform for Detection and Identification of Chemical and Biological Substances
Sponsor: US Department of the Army

The proposed research focuses on the development of a mobile multi-channel optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor system for field applications. In the first phase of the project a laboratory multichannel sensor system will be developed. Then the optical system of the sensor system will be miniaturized leading to a compact, mobile and highly sensitive sensor system. Simultaneously, suitable chemistries for attaching biological recognition elements onto the sensor surface will be developed for specific applications.