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Electrical engineering professors receive NSF grant

Professor Anant Anantram and Professor Eric Klavins won a SemiSynBio grant from the NSF for their research in Highly scalable, random access DNA data storage with nanopore-based reading.

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Electrical engineering professors receive NSF grant Banner

Robotics team heads to China to participate in challenge

UW students will take part in the 2018 RoboMaster competition later this month.

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Robotics team heads to China to participate in challenge Banner

Two electrical engineers selected to attend prestigious conference for women

MIT workshop invites two of EE's own to attend and share research

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Two electrical engineers selected to attend prestigious conference for women Banner

Hwang’s team beats out the competition in AI challenges

Researchers in Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang's lab used artificial intelligence to help improve transportation systems.

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Hwang’s team beats out the competition in AI challenges Banner

Electrical Engineering student selected to attend Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany

Electrical engineering doctoral student Edward Wang's promising research is opening up new doors for him as he nears graduation.

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Electrical Engineering student selected to attend Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany Banner

Alcantara honored with UW Excellence in Teaching Award

The UW honored electrical engineering Ph.D. student Eldridge Alcantara's hard work and dedication to the department with the Excellence in Teaching Award.

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Alcantara honored with UW Excellence in Teaching Award Banner

News + Events

http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/electrical-engineering-professors-receive-nsf-grant/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/robotics-team-heads-to-china-to-participate-in-challenge/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/two-electrical-engineers-selected-to-attend-prestigious-conference-for-women/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/hwangs-team-beats-out-the-competition-in-ai-challenges/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/electrical-engineering-student-selected-to-attend-heidelberg-laureate-forum-in-germany/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/alcantara-honored-with-uw-excellence-in-teaching-award/
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"Semiconductor synthetic biology promises to exceed limits of current data storage and processing methods." -- National Science Foundation.

Read more about their award.

[post_title] => Electrical engineering professors receive NSF grant [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => electrical-engineering-professors-receive-nsf-grant [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-19 16:50:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-19 23:50:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13315 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13303 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-12 09:48:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-12 16:48:57 [post_content] => Electrical engineering students participating in the UW Advanced Robotics team are heading to Shenzen, China later this month to take part in RoboMaster 2018, the world’s leading robotics competition. Designed to “pit university students against each other in the ultimate battle of engineering,” according to the RoboMaster site, the international challenge is hosting 185 colleges, including UW. The university’s team, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Electrical Engineering and advised by Blake Hannaford, professor of electrical engineering, is comprised of 25 students, one drone and seven hand-built robots. The winning team will win a $75,000 prize. __ Related: These attack robots and their UW creators will take on the world at RoboMaster competition in China Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington     [post_title] => Robotics team heads to China to participate in challenge [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => robotics-team-heads-to-china-to-participate-in-challenge [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-12 09:49:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-12 16:49:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13303 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13286 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-09 15:53:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-09 22:53:44 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_13288" align="alignleft" width="150"]Electrical Engineering graduate student Pan Li. Electrical engineering graduate student Pan Li.[/caption] Yaunyaun Shi and Pan Li, graduate students in the Department of Electrical Engineering, have been selected to attend the 2018 Rising Stars in EECS workshop at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in October. The conference brings together more than 60 top female graduates in the fields of electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science, for two days of scientific interactions and career-oriented discussions. According to the American Society for Engineering Education, electrical engineering and computer engineering have the lowest percentages of female undergraduate students in all of engineering: 12.4 percent and 9.2 percent, respectively. The esteemed conference will give Shi and Li an opportunity to present their research to and receive career advice from faculty at Carnegie Mellon University, MIT, Stanford University and other top universities. Both students are working under the direction of Baosen Zhang, the Keith and Nancy Rattie Endowed Career Development Professor. [caption id="attachment_13289" align="alignright" width="150"] Electrical engineering graduate student Yuanyuan Shi.[/caption] Shi will present her work in “Real-time control for complex physical systems: a tractable data-driven approach and Li will present her work on “A bottom-up perspective of power system operation: coordination of demand and response and distributed energy resources.” “This workshop provides us a chance to network with peers -- a group of young and bright women electrical engineers and computer scientists interested in exploring academic careers,” Shi said about the conference. “It opens the door for future collaboration and professional support for years to come." Shi added that it would set her career on the right path once she has completed her graduate degree. For Li, it’s an opportunity to network and find mentorship. “I am interested in attending because I am curious about the life of a female faculty member in engineering,” Li said about why she wanted to be a part of the conference. “I would also love to learn the challenges of being a faculty and take advice from professors that have already been working years in academia and connect me with my peers who share the same desires.” This is the sixth year for this event, created for females in EECS fields that are interested in pursuing academic careers. According to the Rising Stars website, “conference attendees have gone on to secure faculty positions at top universities or research positions in leading industry labs.”       [post_title] => Two electrical engineers selected to attend prestigious conference for women [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => two-electrical-engineers-selected-to-attend-prestigious-conference-for-women [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-09 16:00:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-09 23:00:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13286 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13263 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-03 11:27:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-03 18:27:00 [post_content] => Every day, people are using artificial intelligence (AI) in a variety of capacities to make lives easier, safer and more advanced—including in transportation. A team of UW graduate and undergraduate students and researchers has been recognized for its significant research in making transportation systems smarter and safer. The group, led by Electrical Engineering Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang, won two out of three track challenges from the AI City Challenge at the 2018 IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) held in Salt Lake City. Graduate students Zheng Tang, Gaoang Wang and Hao Xiao, and undergraduate student Aotian Zheng, researchers in Hwang’s Information Processing Lab, were a part of the award-winning team. [caption id="attachment_13264" align="alignleft" width="300"]Hwang and his team, Zheng Tang, Gaoang Wang and Hao Xiao, and undergraduate student Aotian Zheng, receiving their award. Hwang and his team, Zheng Tang, Gaoang Wang and Hao Xiao, and undergraduate student Aotian Zheng, receiving their award.[/caption] According to Hwang, The AI City Challenge tasks competitors to interpret copious hours of traffic footage from cameras on the highways and streets to better understand transportation. Each track challenge has footage from different locations. Teams have to use their own programs to analyze the footage and find the solutions to problems given to them for the challenge. In the first track, teams were given a test set of 27 one-minute videos and told to analyze the traffic flow. They were told to analyze the speed of the cars in the video. There were “control” cars in the videos, too. These cars were placed in traffic by the challenge, so that they knew the actual speed of some of the cars in the video. Of the 56 teams participating in this challenge, only 13 teams eventually submitted their analyzation, with Hwang’s team doing the best of all of the competitors. Track two, which the UW team did not participate in, was about anomaly detection. Groups were supposed to analyze 100 detected anomalies and find out what caused car crashes or stalled vehicles. And the third track challenge was about using multi-sensor vehicle detection and re-identification to see which vehicles passed four different locations in a set of 15 videos. While each team used different AI tech to interpret the data, Hwang’s team once again won track three, beating out 61 teams that tried to participate and 10 that actually submitted results of the challenge. According to Hwang, the teams have published their results and submitted the open-source codes they used so that the information is public for everyone to improve upon for the common good. Additionally, the group won two advanced graphics processing units (GPUs) from the challenge sponsor, NVidia company. “We also get a lot of visibility,” said Hwang about their wins. “In our case, there were already some companies approaching us at the conference. It’s important technology for security, smart cities, customer service and even autonomous driving.”   [post_title] => Hwang’s team beats out the competition in AI challenges [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hwangs-team-beats-out-the-competition-in-ai-challenges [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-12 14:21:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-12 21:21:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13263 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13235 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-06-27 11:55:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-27 18:55:05 [post_content] => Edward Wang, a doctoral student in electrical engineering at the University of Washington, has been selected to attend the 2018 Heidelberg Laureate Forum. The forum brings together laureates of prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science, and 200 carefully chosen young researchers from around the world, for a week of scientific inspiration, social networking and outreach. According to Wang’s advisor, Shwetak Patel, professor of electrical engineering and computer science and engineering, the forum selects high-achieving graduate students from around the world. Wang was chosen, in part, because of the breadth of his research in utilizing computing to improve the access to healthcare around the world. “He touches not only he electrical engineering/computer science side of the research questions, but he is able to connect them to bio engineering and clinical practice,” said Patel. “His work is also having global health impact such as in Peru with his HemaApp work. The scientific rigor of his work, coupled with real world deployments is what sets his work apart.” [caption id="attachment_13236" align="alignleft" width="200"]Electrical engineering Ph.D. student Edward Wang. Electrical engineering Ph.D. student Edward Wang.[/caption] As a graduate student, Wang has researched and begun to develop ubiquitous health sensing solutions—using sensors to monitor a person’s health more continuously and conveniently and doing so in a cost-effective manner. His work focuses on using his expertise in mobile and embedded systems development, signal processing and machine learning to reimagine health monitoring. He is currently working on several projects to improve different medical needs. A few include HemaApp, a smartphone app that noninvasively monitors blood hemoglobin concentration using the phone camera and flashlight; Seismo, a blood pressure monitoring system using a combination of the phone’s camera and vibration sensor; and OsteoApp, an osteoporosis screening solution using only a smartphone and something that can be used to tap a person’s leg. These technologies aim to improve access to monitoring serious health conditions using commodity devices that are already prevalent in society in even the most remote parts of the world. Wang has other projects in the works, focusing on examining novel solutions that can add next generation wearable devices into the mix for a more complete ecosystem of health and clinical monitoring. As Wang approaches his final year in his Ph.D. program, he hopes that the Heidelberg Laureate Forum will give him the opportunity to showcase some of his work to a new audience and gain a unique networking opportunity. “I get to meet with the people I aspire to be like,” Wang said about the forum. “I’ll be able to talk to them—some of the top researchers in the world—about my work and get their feedback. Not only will this help me greatly in putting together my interview package and dissertation but will definitely shape the way I think about how my work can impact the field of computing at large.” Last year, another member of the ubicomp lab, Mohit Jain, was invited to attend the forum and valued his week in Germany. As Wang decides in his last year whether to begin his post-graduate career in industry or academia, he knows that the forum will have a positive impact on his next career move.     [post_title] => Electrical Engineering student selected to attend Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => electrical-engineering-student-selected-to-attend-heidelberg-laureate-forum-in-germany [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-27 11:55:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-27 18:55:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13235 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13163 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-06-13 14:57:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-13 21:57:39 [post_content] =>
A good teacher understands the needs and challenges of his or her students and gives them the tools to succeed. Electrical engineering Ph.D. student Eldridge Alcantara exemplifies this each day when he works with undergraduate students. His organization, innovation and creativity in teaching has not gone unnoticed. Alcantara has been honored with the University of Washington’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Since 1983, the University of Washington has chosen two graduate teaching assistants who show an “extraordinary ability in teaching” to receive the Excellence in Teaching Award. They are also inducted into the University of Washington Teaching Academy for one year, where they can participate in a variety of Academy-sponsored projects and events. Alcantara is the only electrical engineering student to receive this honor. “Eldridge has a talent for breaking down difficult concepts in ways that make them easier to understand,” Radha Poovendran, professor and chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering, said in his nomination letter for Alcantara’s award. “Through carefully selected examples and clear explanations, Eldridge’s lasting gift to his students is his ability to increase their confidence and technical skills to do well in the course.” [caption id="attachment_13172" align="alignleft" width="200"]EE Ph.D. student Eldridge Alcantara. EE Ph.D. student Eldridge Alcantara.[/caption] In the fall of 2013, Alcantara, who was coming into the electrical engineering’s Ph.D. program, volunteered as a teaching assistant, leading optional discussion sessions. As a volunteer, he would facilitate these sessions for two hours a week, helping students review course content. He said teaching has not only made him face his fear of public speaking but forced him to get creative in finding new ways to teach difficult concepts to help students understand the subject. In 2014, he was named as the lead teaching assistant for the department and has been serving in that role since. Haobo Zhang, an undergraduate student that attended Alcantara’s discussion session said that Alcantara’s teaching style is clear and concise, and his sessions are some of the best Zhang has experienced in college. It even inspired Zhang to volunteer too—the undergraduate helped  Alcantara in the spring quarter to lead the discussions. “My involvement with teaching as an EE 235 discussion section TA and department lead TA is my small way of giving back to the department, which has given me so much already over these last five years,” Alcantara said. “I have had such an amazing, fulfilling and well-rounded experience at UW so far, and one reason for that is the continuing support I get from this department.” Emi Harada, another undergraduate electrical engineering student, said Alcantara’s enthusiasm kept the students engaged and vested in learning on their own. “Rather than just giving the answers straight away for the problems, Eldridge would guide the students there by critical thinking and discussed the right way to approach the problems,” Harada said. “With his mastery in signal processing, he understands what the students may be having difficulties with and gives key examples to help them solve the problems.” Alcantara said that while he is honored by the recognition, he also appreciated the opportunity and support he got from the department, and the time he got to spend with the students. “Hands down, the best part of teaching is interacting with students in my class. I love working with them to clear up their misconceptions from lecture or homework,” Alcantara said. “I enjoy listening to their different points of view on concepts and example problems we are discussing. I just like getting to know my students over an entire quarter and hearing all their different stories about what interests them in electrical engineering. My students probably have no idea how much I continue to learn and be inspired by them.”       [post_title] => Alcantara honored with UW Excellence in Teaching Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => alcantara-honored-with-uw-excellence-in-teaching-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-14 08:50:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-14 15:50:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13163 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => 6 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => view-block [1] => block--spotlight-robust-news ) [_finalHTML:protected] =>
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/electrical-engineering-professors-receive-nsf-grant/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/robotics-team-heads-to-china-to-participate-in-challenge/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/two-electrical-engineers-selected-to-attend-prestigious-conference-for-women/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/hwangs-team-beats-out-the-competition-in-ai-challenges/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/electrical-engineering-student-selected-to-attend-heidelberg-laureate-forum-in-germany/
http://www.ee.washington.edu/spotlight/alcantara-honored-with-uw-excellence-in-teaching-award/
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"Semiconductor synthetic biology promises to exceed limits of current data storage and processing methods." -- National Science Foundation.

Read more about their award.

[post_title] => Electrical engineering professors receive NSF grant [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => electrical-engineering-professors-receive-nsf-grant [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-19 16:50:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-19 23:50:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13315 [menu_order] => 1 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13303 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-12 09:48:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-12 16:48:57 [post_content] => Electrical engineering students participating in the UW Advanced Robotics team are heading to Shenzen, China later this month to take part in RoboMaster 2018, the world’s leading robotics competition. Designed to “pit university students against each other in the ultimate battle of engineering,” according to the RoboMaster site, the international challenge is hosting 185 colleges, including UW. The university’s team, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Electrical Engineering and advised by Blake Hannaford, professor of electrical engineering, is comprised of 25 students, one drone and seven hand-built robots. The winning team will win a $75,000 prize. __ Related: These attack robots and their UW creators will take on the world at RoboMaster competition in China Advanced Robotics at the University of Washington     [post_title] => Robotics team heads to China to participate in challenge [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => robotics-team-heads-to-china-to-participate-in-challenge [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-12 09:49:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-12 16:49:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13303 [menu_order] => 2 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13286 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-09 15:53:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-09 22:53:44 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_13288" align="alignleft" width="150"]Electrical Engineering graduate student Pan Li. Electrical engineering graduate student Pan Li.[/caption] Yaunyaun Shi and Pan Li, graduate students in the Department of Electrical Engineering, have been selected to attend the 2018 Rising Stars in EECS workshop at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in October. The conference brings together more than 60 top female graduates in the fields of electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science, for two days of scientific interactions and career-oriented discussions. According to the American Society for Engineering Education, electrical engineering and computer engineering have the lowest percentages of female undergraduate students in all of engineering: 12.4 percent and 9.2 percent, respectively. The esteemed conference will give Shi and Li an opportunity to present their research to and receive career advice from faculty at Carnegie Mellon University, MIT, Stanford University and other top universities. Both students are working under the direction of Baosen Zhang, the Keith and Nancy Rattie Endowed Career Development Professor. [caption id="attachment_13289" align="alignright" width="150"] Electrical engineering graduate student Yuanyuan Shi.[/caption] Shi will present her work in “Real-time control for complex physical systems: a tractable data-driven approach and Li will present her work on “A bottom-up perspective of power system operation: coordination of demand and response and distributed energy resources.” “This workshop provides us a chance to network with peers -- a group of young and bright women electrical engineers and computer scientists interested in exploring academic careers,” Shi said about the conference. “It opens the door for future collaboration and professional support for years to come." Shi added that it would set her career on the right path once she has completed her graduate degree. For Li, it’s an opportunity to network and find mentorship. “I am interested in attending because I am curious about the life of a female faculty member in engineering,” Li said about why she wanted to be a part of the conference. “I would also love to learn the challenges of being a faculty and take advice from professors that have already been working years in academia and connect me with my peers who share the same desires.” This is the sixth year for this event, created for females in EECS fields that are interested in pursuing academic careers. According to the Rising Stars website, “conference attendees have gone on to secure faculty positions at top universities or research positions in leading industry labs.”       [post_title] => Two electrical engineers selected to attend prestigious conference for women [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => two-electrical-engineers-selected-to-attend-prestigious-conference-for-women [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-09 16:00:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-09 23:00:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13286 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13263 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-03 11:27:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-03 18:27:00 [post_content] => Every day, people are using artificial intelligence (AI) in a variety of capacities to make lives easier, safer and more advanced—including in transportation. A team of UW graduate and undergraduate students and researchers has been recognized for its significant research in making transportation systems smarter and safer. The group, led by Electrical Engineering Professor Jenq-Neng Hwang, won two out of three track challenges from the AI City Challenge at the 2018 IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) held in Salt Lake City. Graduate students Zheng Tang, Gaoang Wang and Hao Xiao, and undergraduate student Aotian Zheng, researchers in Hwang’s Information Processing Lab, were a part of the award-winning team. [caption id="attachment_13264" align="alignleft" width="300"]Hwang and his team, Zheng Tang, Gaoang Wang and Hao Xiao, and undergraduate student Aotian Zheng, receiving their award. Hwang and his team, Zheng Tang, Gaoang Wang and Hao Xiao, and undergraduate student Aotian Zheng, receiving their award.[/caption] According to Hwang, The AI City Challenge tasks competitors to interpret copious hours of traffic footage from cameras on the highways and streets to better understand transportation. Each track challenge has footage from different locations. Teams have to use their own programs to analyze the footage and find the solutions to problems given to them for the challenge. In the first track, teams were given a test set of 27 one-minute videos and told to analyze the traffic flow. They were told to analyze the speed of the cars in the video. There were “control” cars in the videos, too. These cars were placed in traffic by the challenge, so that they knew the actual speed of some of the cars in the video. Of the 56 teams participating in this challenge, only 13 teams eventually submitted their analyzation, with Hwang’s team doing the best of all of the competitors. Track two, which the UW team did not participate in, was about anomaly detection. Groups were supposed to analyze 100 detected anomalies and find out what caused car crashes or stalled vehicles. And the third track challenge was about using multi-sensor vehicle detection and re-identification to see which vehicles passed four different locations in a set of 15 videos. While each team used different AI tech to interpret the data, Hwang’s team once again won track three, beating out 61 teams that tried to participate and 10 that actually submitted results of the challenge. According to Hwang, the teams have published their results and submitted the open-source codes they used so that the information is public for everyone to improve upon for the common good. Additionally, the group won two advanced graphics processing units (GPUs) from the challenge sponsor, NVidia company. “We also get a lot of visibility,” said Hwang about their wins. “In our case, there were already some companies approaching us at the conference. It’s important technology for security, smart cities, customer service and even autonomous driving.”   [post_title] => Hwang’s team beats out the competition in AI challenges [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hwangs-team-beats-out-the-competition-in-ai-challenges [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-12 14:21:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-12 21:21:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13263 [menu_order] => 4 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13235 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-06-27 11:55:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-27 18:55:05 [post_content] => Edward Wang, a doctoral student in electrical engineering at the University of Washington, has been selected to attend the 2018 Heidelberg Laureate Forum. The forum brings together laureates of prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science, and 200 carefully chosen young researchers from around the world, for a week of scientific inspiration, social networking and outreach. According to Wang’s advisor, Shwetak Patel, professor of electrical engineering and computer science and engineering, the forum selects high-achieving graduate students from around the world. Wang was chosen, in part, because of the breadth of his research in utilizing computing to improve the access to healthcare around the world. “He touches not only he electrical engineering/computer science side of the research questions, but he is able to connect them to bio engineering and clinical practice,” said Patel. “His work is also having global health impact such as in Peru with his HemaApp work. The scientific rigor of his work, coupled with real world deployments is what sets his work apart.” [caption id="attachment_13236" align="alignleft" width="200"]Electrical engineering Ph.D. student Edward Wang. Electrical engineering Ph.D. student Edward Wang.[/caption] As a graduate student, Wang has researched and begun to develop ubiquitous health sensing solutions—using sensors to monitor a person’s health more continuously and conveniently and doing so in a cost-effective manner. His work focuses on using his expertise in mobile and embedded systems development, signal processing and machine learning to reimagine health monitoring. He is currently working on several projects to improve different medical needs. A few include HemaApp, a smartphone app that noninvasively monitors blood hemoglobin concentration using the phone camera and flashlight; Seismo, a blood pressure monitoring system using a combination of the phone’s camera and vibration sensor; and OsteoApp, an osteoporosis screening solution using only a smartphone and something that can be used to tap a person’s leg. These technologies aim to improve access to monitoring serious health conditions using commodity devices that are already prevalent in society in even the most remote parts of the world. Wang has other projects in the works, focusing on examining novel solutions that can add next generation wearable devices into the mix for a more complete ecosystem of health and clinical monitoring. As Wang approaches his final year in his Ph.D. program, he hopes that the Heidelberg Laureate Forum will give him the opportunity to showcase some of his work to a new audience and gain a unique networking opportunity. “I get to meet with the people I aspire to be like,” Wang said about the forum. “I’ll be able to talk to them—some of the top researchers in the world—about my work and get their feedback. Not only will this help me greatly in putting together my interview package and dissertation but will definitely shape the way I think about how my work can impact the field of computing at large.” Last year, another member of the ubicomp lab, Mohit Jain, was invited to attend the forum and valued his week in Germany. As Wang decides in his last year whether to begin his post-graduate career in industry or academia, he knows that the forum will have a positive impact on his next career move.     [post_title] => Electrical Engineering student selected to attend Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => electrical-engineering-student-selected-to-attend-heidelberg-laureate-forum-in-germany [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-27 11:55:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-27 18:55:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13235 [menu_order] => 5 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13163 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-06-13 14:57:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-13 21:57:39 [post_content] =>
A good teacher understands the needs and challenges of his or her students and gives them the tools to succeed. Electrical engineering Ph.D. student Eldridge Alcantara exemplifies this each day when he works with undergraduate students. His organization, innovation and creativity in teaching has not gone unnoticed. Alcantara has been honored with the University of Washington’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Since 1983, the University of Washington has chosen two graduate teaching assistants who show an “extraordinary ability in teaching” to receive the Excellence in Teaching Award. They are also inducted into the University of Washington Teaching Academy for one year, where they can participate in a variety of Academy-sponsored projects and events. Alcantara is the only electrical engineering student to receive this honor. “Eldridge has a talent for breaking down difficult concepts in ways that make them easier to understand,” Radha Poovendran, professor and chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering, said in his nomination letter for Alcantara’s award. “Through carefully selected examples and clear explanations, Eldridge’s lasting gift to his students is his ability to increase their confidence and technical skills to do well in the course.” [caption id="attachment_13172" align="alignleft" width="200"]EE Ph.D. student Eldridge Alcantara. EE Ph.D. student Eldridge Alcantara.[/caption] In the fall of 2013, Alcantara, who was coming into the electrical engineering’s Ph.D. program, volunteered as a teaching assistant, leading optional discussion sessions. As a volunteer, he would facilitate these sessions for two hours a week, helping students review course content. He said teaching has not only made him face his fear of public speaking but forced him to get creative in finding new ways to teach difficult concepts to help students understand the subject. In 2014, he was named as the lead teaching assistant for the department and has been serving in that role since. Haobo Zhang, an undergraduate student that attended Alcantara’s discussion session said that Alcantara’s teaching style is clear and concise, and his sessions are some of the best Zhang has experienced in college. It even inspired Zhang to volunteer too—the undergraduate helped  Alcantara in the spring quarter to lead the discussions. “My involvement with teaching as an EE 235 discussion section TA and department lead TA is my small way of giving back to the department, which has given me so much already over these last five years,” Alcantara said. “I have had such an amazing, fulfilling and well-rounded experience at UW so far, and one reason for that is the continuing support I get from this department.” Emi Harada, another undergraduate electrical engineering student, said Alcantara’s enthusiasm kept the students engaged and vested in learning on their own. “Rather than just giving the answers straight away for the problems, Eldridge would guide the students there by critical thinking and discussed the right way to approach the problems,” Harada said. “With his mastery in signal processing, he understands what the students may be having difficulties with and gives key examples to help them solve the problems.” Alcantara said that while he is honored by the recognition, he also appreciated the opportunity and support he got from the department, and the time he got to spend with the students. “Hands down, the best part of teaching is interacting with students in my class. I love working with them to clear up their misconceptions from lecture or homework,” Alcantara said. “I enjoy listening to their different points of view on concepts and example problems we are discussing. I just like getting to know my students over an entire quarter and hearing all their different stories about what interests them in electrical engineering. My students probably have no idea how much I continue to learn and be inspired by them.”       [post_title] => Alcantara honored with UW Excellence in Teaching Award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => alcantara-honored-with-uw-excellence-in-teaching-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-14 08:50:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-14 15:50:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=spotlight&p=13163 [menu_order] => 6 [post_type] => spotlight [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 13315 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2018-07-19 16:49:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-19 23:49:25 [post_content] =>

"Semiconductor synthetic biology promises to exceed limits of current data storage and processing methods." -- National Science Foundation.

Read more about their award.

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