Skip to main content

Alum George Huang to be UW EE’s 2017 Graduation Speaker

Dr. George Huang (Ph.D. ’73), CEO and Chairman of FutureDial, will be the University of Washington Department of Electrical Engineering’s (UW EE) 2017 graduation speaker at the June 7th ceremony.

Learn More

Alum George Huang to be UW EE’s 2017 Graduation Speaker Banner

Startup WiBotic Raises $2.5M to Charge Drones and Robots Wirelessly

Founded by UW EE alum Ben Waters (Ph.D. '15) and Professor Joshua Smith, WiBotic landed a $2.5 million investment, supporting the company's development of wirelessly-powered technologies.

Learn More

Startup WiBotic Raises $2.5M to Charge Drones and Robots Wirelessly Banner

Graduate Student Tanner Fiez Receives Prestigious NDSEG Fellowship

The NDSEG is a highly-competitive fellowship from the U.S. Department of Defense. It offers a three-year stipend to individuals who have demonstrated the ability and special aptitude for advanced training in science and engineering.

Learn More

Graduate Student Tanner Fiez Receives Prestigious NDSEG Fellowship Banner

UW Alums Milton and Delia Zeutschel Endow Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone Program

The Zeutschels' generous gift supports UW EE's Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone Program and a new professorship in entrepreneurial excellence.

Learn More

UW Alums Milton and Delia Zeutschel Endow Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone Program Banner

Graduate and Undergraduate Students Receive Second Place at EIC Competition for Environmental Innovation

The competition, which recognizes the important work of student entrepreneurs, awarded the team for their environmentally-focused device, Airy.

Learn More

Graduate and Undergraduate Students Receive Second Place at EIC Competition for Environmental Innovation Banner

Graduate Students Mayoore Jaiswal and Kevin Lybarger Named Husky 100

The Husky 100 is a distinction given to the one hundred most impactful UW students of the academic year.

Learn More

Graduate Students Mayoore Jaiswal and Kevin Lybarger Named Husky 100 Banner

UW Security Researchers Show that Google’s AI Tool for Video Searches Can Be Easily Deceived

The tool, which uses machine learning to automatically analyze and label video content, can be deceived by inserting a photograph periodically and at a very low rate into videos, impacting the functionality of the software.

Learn More

UW Security Researchers Show that Google’s AI Tool for Video Searches Can Be Easily Deceived Banner

Professor Eve Riskin Talks Women and STEM at Starbucks Seminar

Associate Dean of Diversity and Access and Professor Eve Riskin was a featured speaker at last month’s “Advancing Women in STEM” seminar.

Learn More

Professor Eve Riskin Talks Women and STEM at Starbucks Seminar Banner

Professor Sreeram Kannan Receives Prestigious NSF CAREER Award

The NSF Early Career Development (CAREER) Program offers support of early-career faculty, who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization.

Learn More

Professor Sreeram Kannan Receives Prestigious NSF CAREER Award Banner

UW Radio Researchers Break World Record with Full Duplex Communication

Electrical engineers in the FAST Lab at the UW, recently demonstrated the novel radio system that uses a new high-frequency integrated CMOS chip and embedded processor.

Learn More

UW Radio Researchers Break World Record with Full Duplex Communication Banner

Professors Lillian Ratliff and Andrew Clark Receive Competitive NSF CRII Grants

The NSF Research Initiation Initiative (CRII) grant supports faculty early in their careers as a way to establish research independence. Each year, the NSF awards only 25 to 30 grants nationwide.

Learn More

Professors Lillian Ratliff and Andrew Clark Receive Competitive NSF CRII Grants Banner

Undergraduate Student Evan Wang Receives UW High Scholarship

UW EE senior, Evan Wang, received the 2015-2016 Junior Medal for High Scholarship. The Junior High Scholarship is awarded to the highest-performing junior at the university.

Learn More

Undergraduate Student Evan Wang Receives UW High Scholarship Banner

Undergraduate Student, Megan Swanson, Admitted to SUPERB-ITS Program

The SUPERB-ITS program at Berkeley prepares participants for graduate school and promotes research for societal good.

Learn More

Undergraduate Student, Megan Swanson, Admitted to SUPERB-ITS Program Banner

Professor John Sahr Appointed USRA Representative

The University Space Research Association is a consortium of nation-wide university and in-house talent. Electrical Engineering Professor John Sahr was appointed as the University of Washington representative.

Learn More

Professor John Sahr Appointed USRA Representative Banner

UW Security Researchers Show that Google’s AI Tool for Image Analysis Cannot Cope with Noise

The researchers have shown that Google’s new tool that uses machine learning to automatically analyze images can be defeated by adding image noise.

Learn More

UW Security Researchers Show that Google’s AI Tool for Image Analysis Cannot Cope with Noise Banner
notabletemp2
uweeViewEvents Object
(
    [_type:protected] => event
    [_from:protected] => 
    [_args:protected] => Array
        (
            [post_type] => event
            [tax_query] => Array
                (
                    [0] => Array
                        (
                            [taxonomy] => event_tag
                            [field] => slug
                            [terms] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => front-page
                                    [1] => event_tag
                                )

                        )

                )

            [posts_per_page] => -1
            [post_status] => publish
        )

    [_jids:protected] => 
    [_taxa:protected] => Array
        (
            [event_tag] => Array
                (
                    [0] => front-page
                    [1] => event_tag
                )

        )

    [_meta:protected] => Array
        (
        )

    [_metarelation:protected] => AND
    [_results:protected] => Array
        (
            [0] => WP_Post Object
                (
                    [ID] => 10399
                    [post_author] => 13
                    [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:52
                    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:52
                    [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management.

Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-dec-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:55:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:55:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10399 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10398 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:12 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-nov-9-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:56:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:56:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10398 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10397 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:50:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:50:25 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-oct-12-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:56:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:56:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10397 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10396 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:49:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:49:39 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-sept-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:56:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:56:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10396 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10395 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:48:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:48:48 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-aug-10-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:57:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:57:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10395 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10394 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:47:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:47:49 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, July 13, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-july-13-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:57:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:57:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10394 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10393 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:47:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:47:01 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, June 8, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-june-8-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:57:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:57:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10393 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10392 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 15:55:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 22:55:09 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, May 11, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-may-11-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:58:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:58:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10392 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10357 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-04-12 16:01:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-12 23:01:09 [post_content] =>

capstone-fair-website-header_v2

The Electrical Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone (ENGINE) program, which was rolled out in Spring 2016, offers students the mentorship of engineering professionals. Students work on industry-sponsored projects, developing their skills in innovation, systems engineering, project management and project development. Since its introductory year, the ENGINE program has already seen significant growth from interested students and local companies. Currently, more than 50 percent of the UW EE undergraduate graduating class is enrolled in the program. Students work on cutting-edge projects, including drone radar, transit apps, space communications and clean energy. On May 30, students will present their projects to peers, industry professionals and faculty.

2017 Details

When

  • Tuesday, May 30
  • 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Where

  • HUB South Ballroom

Sponsoring Companies

  • Blue Origin
  • Booz Allen Hamilton
  • dToor
  • Echodyne
  • Fluke
  • Fizikl
  • Millenium Space Systems
  • Nvidia
  • Plugable Technologies
  • Seattle Department of Transportation
  • Seattle Mountain Rescue
  • Tupl
  • UW Medicine
  • Voicebox
  • Wally Labs

Project Examples

capstone-project-examples

Registration

For Students

All students enrolled in undergraduate or graduate capstone classes are encouraged to register to present their projects at the fair.
  • Deadline:  Wednesday, April 26, 2017
  • Registration:  Via Catalyst
[post_title] => The 2017 Electrical Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone Fair [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-engineering-entrepreneurial-capstone-fair [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-17 15:55:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-17 22:55:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10357 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10313 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-07 16:12:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-07 23:12:34 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Programmable Photonic Communication Systems"

Photonics is increasingly more attractive as a technology platform for addressing technological barriers facing bedrock high technology areas including next generation microprocessors and computing platforms, high speed communication systems, wireless networks and smart cities. Integrated photonics, coupled with decades of technological maturation, is enabling more complex, multi-component photonic systems that are essential in these applications. Software control together with photonic integration in particular form a vehicle for these photonic systems to scale and find widespread application. The resultant combination of basic physical phenomena, complex material and device architectures, application requirements and software control is opening up new interdisciplinary research problems. In this talk, I will review recent technological trends around integrated photonics and data communications and computing. Fiber optical communication systems, in particular, are at the leading edge of these trends. I will describe a long standing problem facing optically switched communication networks, which is the bottleneck created by peering requirements at Internet exchange points (IXP). Software defined networking (SDN) and integrated photonic devices are used to provide an optical layer peering mechanism with service level agreement (SLA) enforcement. Using 100 Gb/s polarization multiplexed quadrature phase shift keyed (PM-QPSK) optical signals, high capacity can be delivered with low latency across multiple network domains, a critical requirement expected for 5G mobile and data center interconnection (DCI) networks.

Speaker

Dan Kilper

Daniel Kilper (University of Arizona)

Daniel Kilper is a research professor in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He holds a joint appointment in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Arizona and an adjunct faculty position in electrical engineering at Columbia University. He received a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Michigan in 1996. From 2000-2013 he was a member of technical staff at Bell Labs. Within both academia and industry, he has made contributions in the area of communication devices and networks primarily spanning three areas: energy efficient communication networks, optical performance monitoring and dynamic optical networks. He is a senior member of IEEE and is an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Green Communications and Networking and a steering committee member for the IEEE Green ICT Initiative. He currently serves as administrative director for the Center for Integrated Access Networks, an NSF Engineering Research Center and has served in leadership positions in multi-university/industry consortia including the Center for Telecommunications Value Chain Research (CTVR), Center for Energy Efficient Telecommunications (CEET) and the GreenTouch Consortium. His work has been recognized with the Bell Labs President's Gold Medal Award and he served on the Bell Labs President’s Advisory Council on Research. He holds seven patents and authored four book chapters and more than one hundred thirty peer-reviewed publications.

  [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Dan Kilper [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-dan-kilper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-11 14:07:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-11 21:07:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10313 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10230 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-03-28 11:56:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-28 18:56:57 [post_content] => Casino Night 2017 Casino Night 2017 is here!  This popular event, hosted by the student-run IEEE/HKN society, is for electrical engineering and computer science students and industry representatives only.  With both casual gaming and designated time for recruitment, the evening is a fun, relaxed environment where professionals in the field can talk personally with students about their goals and interests.  More than 80 students had the opportunity to mingle and chat with eight companies at Casino Night 2016. Light food and beverages are provided. And UW EE faculty serve as the dealers!

When & Where

For Industry

Chat with up-and-coming electrical and computer science engineers in a relaxed, fun environment!
  • Register via Eventbrite (Password: UWIEEEHKN)
  • Deadline:  April 10, 2017
  • Cost:  $100 for Casino Night 2017 / $250 for Casino Night 2017 + 1 tech talk in autumn quarter 2017
  • Questions:  Contact the IEEE/HKN officers.

For Students

Come network with company representatives from Microsoft, ESI and more over casino games and dinner!  Dress is business casual.  Resumes are strongly recommended -- you can either upload yours in advance via the Catalyst drop box or bring print copies with you.
  • Register via Eventbrite
  • Cost: Free for IEEE members; $5 for non-members.
  • Deadline:  Students can continue to register throughout the event.
[post_title] => Casino Night 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => casino-night-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-07 10:37:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-07 17:37:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10230 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10088 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-06 21:39:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-07 05:39:10 [post_content] => 2017 Puget Sound Alumni Mixer

When

  • Thursday, May 4, 2017
  • 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Where

  • Amazon Campus Van Vorst Library 426 Terry Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98109

RSVP

We're so sorry, but we've reached capacity for this event and closed registration.  To keep abreast of upcoming opportunities to connect with UW EE, please visit our Alumni page.  Hope to see you at our next Puget Sound area event!

About the Event

For the second year in a row, we are fortunate to have Vice-President of Amazon and UW EE Affiliate Professor Babak Parviz host the Department of Electrical Engineering alumni mixer at Amazon’s campus. The evening is an opportunity for guests to network with each other and meet current UW EE leadership and faculty while hearing about today’s research. Due to the overwhelming response last year, please note space is limited and registration will close when capacity has been reached. We encourage you to RSVP early. Hosts: 
rp-headhsot

Radha Poovendran Professor and Chair

Research areas: Security, biosystems and machine learning
bp-headshot

Babak Parviz VP at Amazon and Affiliate Professor

Research areas:
High-tech with social impact

Featured Faculty Members: 
pa-headshot

Payman Arabshahi Associate Professor

Research areas: Underwater and space communications
la-headhsot

Les Atlas Professor

Research areas:
Signal processing for dynamical systems

bd-headshot

Bruce Darling Professor

Research areas: Integrated sensor development
Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff

Lillian Ratliff Assistant Professor

Research areas:
Next-generation urban infrastructure systems

mr-headshot

Matt Reynolds Associate Professor

Research areas:
Smart materials, RFID and WPT

ms-headshot

Mani Soma Professor

Research areas: Mixed-signal, RF, high-frequency ICs
bz-headshot

Baosen Zhang Assistant Professor

Research areas:
Smart cities and power systems

[post_title] => The 2017 Puget Sound Alumni Mixer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-puget-sound-alumni-mixer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 13:20:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 20:20:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10088 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9893 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-02-16 16:52:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-17 00:52:54 [post_content] =>

When

Saturday, April 22 9-10:30 a.m.

Where

EE Building — Upper Basement Benton Lane Seattle WA 98195 (For directions, download this PDF.) [caption id="attachment_10483" align="aligncenter" width="625"]entrance for Discovery Days Alumni Breakfast Look for the exterior entrance as pictured on the left, then choose the doors that lead you to the UW EE administrative offices. From there, follow the signs to join us for breakfast![/caption]

RSVP

We're so sorry -- we have reached capacity and closed registration for this event.  We invite you to still visit campus to enjoy Discovery Days exhibits, and we hope you can join us for breakfast next year!

About the Event

The UW College of Engineering's Discovery Days (April 21-22) is a great opportunity for students and families from all over the Puget Sound region to join for hands-on activities (like discovering the mechanics behind making a pickle glow and a robot shake hands). The Department of Electrical Engineering will hold an exclusive breakfast for our alumni and their children or grandchildren for a sneak preview of the Discovery Days exhibits before they are open to the general public. It’s a tradition we started last year with great response from the EE community. We look forward to meeting your family at the breakfast. View a selection of photos from last year's Discovery Days: 2016 Discovery Days

Parking on Campus

Upon Arrival to Campus

  • Stop at a campus gatehouse and advise the Parking Specialist that you are attending the “EE Alumni Breakfast” in the Electrical Engineering Department.
  • A parking permit, with the closest available parking lot, will be printed and given to you to display on your vehicle's dashboard as instructed.
  • If you need disability accommodations, please advise the Parking Specialist.

 Estimated Saturday Morning Parking Rates

  • Surface Parking Lots: $5, arrival prior to 12 p.m. (noon) on Saturday.
  • Central Plaza Garage: $10, arrival prior to 12 p.m. (noon) on Saturday.
Note: If your visit is less than one hour, be sure to stop at a campus gatehouse as you exit for a prorated refund.  Please contact the Transportation Services, Events Office at 206.616.8710 or via email at tsevents@uw.edu if you have any questions or need further assistance with your parking arrangement at the University of Washington, Seattle Campus. [post_title] => The 2017 Discovery Days: Alumni Breakfast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-discovery-days-alumni-breakfast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 13:06:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 20:06:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9893 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9831 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-02-02 14:19:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-02 22:19:32 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Building Secure-Aware Cyber-Physical Systems: A Satisfiability Modulo Convex Optimization Approach"

The rapidly increasing dependence on cyber-physical systems (CPS) in building critical infrastructures — in the context of smart cities, power grids, medical devices and self-driving cars — has opened the gates to increasingly sophisticated and harmful attacks with financial, societal, criminal or political effects. While a traditional cyber-attack may leak credit-card or other personal sensitive information, a CPS-attack can lead to a loss of control in nuclear reactors, gas turbines, the power grid, transportation networks and other critical infrastructure, placing the nation’s security, economy and public safety at risk. I will start this talk by motivating for the differences between CPS-security and cyber-security. To this end, I will show experimental results on non-invasive sensor spoofing attacks targeting the anti-lock brake systems (ABS) in automobiles. As the need for CPS-security becomes evident,  I will focus on a problem known as "secure state estimation.” It aims to estimate the state of a dynamical system when an adversary arbitrarily corrupts a subset of its sensors.  Although of critical importance, this problem is NP-hard and combinatorial in nature since the subset of attacked sensors is unknown. I will show that the "secure state estimation" is a special case of a larger class of logic formulas, termed satisfiability modulo convex (SMC) formulas. I will present then a new satisfiability modulo convex procedure that uses a lazy combination of Boolean satisfiability solving and convex programming to provide a satisfying assignment or determine that the formula is unsatisfiable. I will finish by showing, through multiple experimental and simulation results that SMC solvers outperform other techniques when used to solve the secure state estimation problem.

Speaker

Yasser Shoukry

Yasser Shoukry (UC Berkeley)

Yasser Shoukry is a postdoctoral scholar at the EECS Department at UC Berkeley, the EE Department at UCLA and the ESE Department at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from UCLA in 2015 where he was affiliated with both the Cyber-Physical Systems Lab as well as the Networked and Embedded Systems Lab. Before joining UCLA, he spent four years as an R&D engineer in the industry of automotive embedded systems. His research interests include the design and implementation of secure- and privacy-aware cyber-physical systems and Internet of Things (IoT) by drawing on tools from control theory, optimization theory, embedded systems and formal methods. Shoukry is the recipient of the Best Paper Award from the International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS) in 2016. He is also the recipient of the UCLA EE Distinguished Ph.D. Dissertation Award in 2016, the UCLA Chancellors prize in 2011 and 2012, UCLA EE Graduate Division Fellowship in 2011 and 2012 and the UCLA EE Preliminary Exam Fellowship in 2012. In 2015, Shoukry led the UCLA/Caltech/CMU team to win the first place in the NSF Early Career Investigators (NSF-ECI) research challenge. His team represented the NSF-ECI in the NIST Global Cities Technology Challenge, an initiative designed to advance the deployment of IoT technologies within a smart city. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Yasser Shoukry [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-yasser-shoukry [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-08 16:32:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 00:32:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9831 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9800 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-31 13:08:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:08:07 [post_content] =>

Monday, Feb. 27, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => BSMS Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bsms-program-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 13:08:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:08:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9800 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [15] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9798 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-31 13:00:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:00:09 [post_content] =>

Are you an engineering, math or physical sciences student interested in graduate school in electrical engineering? Please join us to learn more about the daytime MSEE and Ph.D. programs in electrical engineering. Current UW EE graduate students and advisers will be available to answer questions!

Topics

  • Preparation and admissions
  • Master’s vs. Ph.D. programs
  • Degree requirements
  • Research groups
  • And more!

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017

  • 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
  [post_title] => Graduate Programs Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-programs-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 13:01:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:01:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9798 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9783 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-26 16:07:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-27 00:07:08 [post_content] =>

On-campus information sessions give prospective students an opportunity for one-on-one conversation with the Professional Programs Advising Office and faculty. Sessions provide a comprehensive overview of the Electrical Engineering Professional Master’s Program, including admissions requirements, deadlines, PMP curriculum and the PMP community. We invite you to attend!

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Stay Updated

Join the PMP mailing list to stay up to date on upcoming information sessions, application deadlines and other program activities. [post_title] => Professional Master's Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professional-masters-program-information-session-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 12:56:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 20:56:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9783 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9781 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-26 16:05:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-27 00:05:33 [post_content] =>

On-campus information sessions give prospective students an opportunity for one-on-one conversation with the Professional Programs Advising Office and faculty. Sessions provide a comprehensive overview of the Electrical Engineering Professional Master’s Program, including admissions requirements, deadlines, PMP curriculum and the PMP community. We invite you to attend!

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017

Stay Updated

Join the PMP mailing list to stay up to date on upcoming information sessions, application deadlines and other program activities. [post_title] => Professional Master's Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professional-masters-program-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 12:56:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 20:56:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9781 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9677 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-23 10:52:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-23 18:52:23 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Next-Generation Computing using Spin-Based and 2D Materials"

We are at a time where the electronics industry is feeling pressure from two sides: on the small scale we are facing the fundamental physical limits of silicon, and on the large scale we are facing new big-data applications, such as for the internet of things. The future of computing will require both more energy-efficient electronics and more big-data-driven, application-specific designs. Magnetic devices are a promising candidate for future electronics, due to their low voltage operation, nonvolatility and low thermal budget, which can open up new energy-efficient, normally-off, memory-in-computing, 3D monolithic architectures. Magnetic materials are one of the few materials systems that can be more energy efficient than silicon transistors for memory and logic, and have been shown to be more energy efficient and faster than other emerging resistive memories. Additionally, the emerging class of 2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have little to no surface roughness with monolayer thickness, and thus 2D transistors can be scaled without sacrificing mobility. They have the benefits of flexibility and low thermal budget, and new physics we can utilize such as the valley Hall effect. Thus, spin-based and 2D materials are very important classes of materials to explore for beyond-CMOS devices and systems. I will present experimental results using three-terminal spin switches to build practical magnetic logic devices and circuits and show they satisfy the requirements for beyond-CMOS devices. We show a single device can act as an inverter, and we are able to propagate bits between the spin switches to build up circuits. I will also show our work on voltage control of the spin and valley Hall effect in TMD materials, which could be used for future 2D-magnetic hybrid devices. I will discuss the future directions of this work, including building energy-efficient 3D monolithic systems of these emerging technologies, and looking further to quantum computing.

Speaker

Jean Anne Incorvia

Jean Anne Incorvia (Stanford University)

Jean Anne C. Incorvia is a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford University in electrical engineering and a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley electrical engineering and computer science. She received her Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University in 2015, cross-registered at MIT, where she was a Department of Energy Graduate Student Fellow. She received her bachelor’s in physics from UC Berkeley in 2008. Her research focuses on emerging materials and devices for nanoelectronics. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Jean Anne Incorvia [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-jean-anne-incorvia [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-23 10:53:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-23 18:53:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9677 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9648 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-13 15:43:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-13 23:43:53 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Connectivity Meets Computing: A Wireless Networking Perspective"

Networks of tomorrow are more about “user quality of experience” than they are about “network quality of service.” Wireless mobile networks, being an integral part of such a vision, will need to evolve from their current generation (4G LTE) to a more radical one (5G) to cater to such expectations. While connectivity will continue being a key enabler in such a transformation, one cannot ignore the confluence of connectivity and computing that is pervading the mobile ecosystem, both on the user side (e.g. smart phones, wearables) as well as on the network side (e.g. software-defined mobile networks). This talk will draw from some of my works that aim to push the envelope in connectivity as well as its confluence with computing from the perspective of wireless networks. In the space of connectivity, I will motivate the need for a radically new wireless access paradigm called “Access Asynchronously, Transmit Synchronously” (A2TS) to meet the demands of future 5G networks. A2TS brings together the best of two highly disparate wireless technologies — asynchronous Wi-Fi that enables scalable, coexistence-friendly deployments and synchronous LTE that delivers superior performance through advanced wireless techniques. I will discuss how to design the A2TS access paradigm from first principles, and then illustrate its real-world potential by building a scalable, network MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output) system using 802.11ac access points. In leveraging the synergy between connectivity and computing, I will highlight the growing importance of clouddriven radio access networks (C-RANs), especially for dense deployments (e.g. event centers, stadiums, urban hot-spots); then introduce the notion of a “software-defined front-haul” (SDF) network that we developed for C-RANs. I will show why SDFs are the key to unlocking the true potential of SDN in wireless access and how they can be dynamically orchestrated to not only optimize individual user and traffic performance, but also contribute to green (energy-efficient) computing in the network. I will conclude by sharing some thoughts on how mobile connectivity and computing need to evolve to support the heterogeneous demands and diversity of future mobile services that range from massive scale IoT to mobile augmented/virtual reality.

Speaker

Karthik Sundaresan

Karthik Sundaresan (NEC Labs America)

Karthikeyan Sundaresan is a senior researcher in the mobile communications and networking research department at NEC Labs America. He received his MS and Ph.D. From the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech. His research interests are broadly in wireless networking and mobile computing, and span both algorithm design as well as system prototyping. He is the recipient of several best paper awards at prestigious ACM and IEEE conferences (MobiHoc, CoNEXT, ICNP, SECON), and is the recipient of ACM Sigmobile’s Rockstar award (2016) for early career contributions to the field of mobile computing. He holds over twenty patents and received a business contribution award from NEC for the technology commercialization of a wireless interference management solution for LTE small-cells. He is a senior member of IEEE and currently serves as an associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Karthik Sundaresan [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-karthik-sundaresan [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-13 15:45:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-13 23:45:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9648 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8778 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 13:16:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 21:16:15 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 9, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Speaker

Grad Showcase

[gallery columns="4" link="none" display="portfolio" ids="10496,10497,10498,10499,10500,10501,10502"] [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Grad Showcase [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-grad-showcase [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-25 15:26:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-25 22:26:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8778 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8777 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:24:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:24:27 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 23, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Speaker

Rafael Piestun

University of Colorado [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Rafael Piestun [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-rafael-piestun [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-20 09:32:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:32:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8777 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8776 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:22:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:22:23 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 18, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Silicon-based Integrated Sensors and Systems with On-chip Antennas: From Picosecond Pulse Radiators to Miniaturized Spectrometers"

Today's silicon process technology makes it possible to integrate everything from antennas to processors on a single chip at almost no cost. This creates new opportunities for implementing complex sensors and systems on a millimeter scale. To create such devices, an understanding of physics, waves, electromagnetics and high-frequency electronics is essential. In this presentation, I will show how the convergence of these fields has resulted in single-chip picosecond pulse radiators, wirelessly synchronized chips with sub-psec synchronization accuracy, miniaturized spectrometers and wirelessly powered sensors and actuators. In the first section of the talk, I will present techniques for generating and detecting picosecond pulses, based on a novel laser-free Digital-to-Impulse (D2I) radiation. This technology can produce broadband pulses with a record width of 1.9psec that cover a frequency spectrum from 30GHz to 1.1THz and that have a resolution of 2Hz at 1THz. I will discuss how this technology enables us to perform broadband THz spectroscopy, hyper-spectral 3D imaging and Tbits/sec wireless communication. In the second part, I will present my work on precision time transfer and wireless synchronization of widely spaced chips. This technique eliminates the wires between the elements of a distributed array and makes it possible to build a highly flexible large aperture. In this section, I will also present my work on optical locking of microwave oscillators, which achieves a picosecond timing accuracy over a 1.5m distance. In the third section of the talk, I will focus on miniaturized spectrometers and sensors. I will discuss an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometer that is based on a single-chip full-duplex transceiver for detecting paramagnetic chemicals and free radicals. The EPR sensor technology developed in my laboratory has been successfully deployed in major oil and gas fields in the United States and Canada. This technology is used to monitor the concentration of asphaltenes (a chemical that clogs oil wells) in real-time and to minimize the use of environmentally hazardous chemical inhibitors in energy production. I will further present my recent work on wirelessly powered microchips with on-chip antennas. These microchips are designed to perform sensing, actuation and localization. I will provide examples of such microchips being used to pace the heart of a sheep and to trigger the leg movement of a rat. Finally, I will discuss the future directions of my research on building wirelessly powered single-chip electronic drugs for medical applications and electronic tracers for energy exploration as well as for industrial monitoring.

Speaker

Aydin Babakhani

Aydin Babakhani (Rice University)

Aydin Babakhani is a Louis Owen Junior Chair Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rice University and the director of Rice Integrated Systems and Circuits Laboratory. He received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology in 2003 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Caltech in 2005 and 2008, respectively. He was a postdoctoral scholar at Caltech in 2009 and a research scientist at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 2010. Babakhani has been awarded multiple best paper awards, including the Best Paper Award at the IEEE SiRF conference in 2016, the Best Paper Award at the IEEE RWS Symposium in 2015, the Best Paper Award at the IEEE IMS Symposium in 2014 and 2nd place in the Best Paper Awards at the IEEE APS Symposium 2016 and IEEE IMS Symposium 2016. He has published more than 85 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings and has 21 issued or pending patents. His research is supported by NSF, DARPA, AFOSR, ONR, the W. M. Keck Foundation, SRC and more than 10 companies. He received a prestigious NSF CAREER award in 2015, an Innovation Award from Northrop Grumman in 2014 and a DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2012. He also received the Caltech Electrical Engineering Department's Charles Wilts Best PhD Thesis Prize for his work titled “Near-Field Direct Antenna Modulation.” He was the recipient of the Microwave Graduate Fellowship in 2007, the Grand Prize in the Stanford–Berkeley–Caltech Innovators Challenge in 2006, the Analog Devices Inc. Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2005, as well as a Caltech Special Institute Fellowship and an Atwood Fellowship in 2003. He was also the Gold Medal winner at both the National Physics Competition in 1998 and the 30th International Physics Olympiad in Padova, Italy, in 1999. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Aydin Babakhani [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-aydin-babakhani [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-07 09:28:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-07 16:28:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8776 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8775 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:20:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:20:54 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 4, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Natural User Interface (NUI) has finally arrived!"

On March 2, 1992, Casper was introduced by Dr. Kai-Fu Lee at Apple on Good Morning America as the first speaker-independent continuous speech recognizer which could interact with human. Apple was too far ahead of time. The technology was not quite there. In 2004, Dr. Lee tried it again at Microsoft, advocating "NUI" (pronounced as /n uw iy/) or Natural User Interface and it was shut down once more. It wasn’t until 2010, after iPhone took over the world, that a personal assistant like Siri shed its light. The advancement and ubiquitous appearance of mobile devices renders NUI a great deal of sense, as typing on small devices is painful. The breakthrough deep neural network (DNN) in 2012 brought speech and image recognition accuracy to a new territory and rallied both research and industry. From then on, artificial intelligence (AI) is finally awake and large. Established companies and startups alike are placing their bets, hoping to be at the forefront of this evolution. Mobvoi, as an established startup, is one of these firms which are determined to play an important role in this historical evolution. I will talk about what our company does and what our vision is, and present some technical work we’ve built along the way.

Speaker

Mei-Yuh HwangMei-Yuh Huang (Mobvoi)

Mei-Yuh Hwang obtained her Ph.D. in computer science in 1993 from Carnegie Mellon University. She learned the core of speech recognition from Dr. Kai-Fu Lee and Raj Reddy. After graduation, she worked at Microsoft Research, later Microsoft speech products, Bing Translation and Chinese Cortana, while serving as a researcher at University of Washington in 2004-2008. Her publications include speech recognition, machine translation and language understanding in the major conferences, IEEE journals, and U.S. patents. She joined Mobvoi in 2016 and is leading its R&D division in Redmond, Washington. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Mei-Yuh Huang [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-mei-yuh-huang [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-28 10:22:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-28 17:22:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8775 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [24] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8774 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:19:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:19:25 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, March 28, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

The wireless industry has put out a vision of 5G enabling extreme mobile broadband with peak data rates of more than 10Gbps, ultra-low latency with end-to-end latencies of less than 1ms and ultra-reliability to support mission critical applications. Current cellular networks that have been designed for human interactions and latencies of 100ms will transform into networks designed for real-time machine-to-machine interactions. In this talk, I will introduce 5G, discuss applications enabled by 5G, where to find spectrum for 5G and present some recent results in indoor environments.

Speaker

Klaus Doppler (Nokia)

_dsc0264n

Klaus Doppler joined Nokia in 2002. He has contributed to Nokia’s 4G, 5G and Wi-Fi research in multiple roles. Currently, he is heading the Connectivity Lab in Nokia Bell Labs and his research focus is on indoor networks. In the past, he has been responsible for the wireless research and standardization (4G, 5G, Wi-Fi) in Nokia Technologies, incubated a new business line, contributed to Nokia’s radio technology vision and has led various research projects. He has pioneered research on Device-to-Device Communications underlaying LTE networks. Klaus received his Ph.D. from Helsinki University of Technology, Finland in 2010 and his MSc. in Electrical Engineering from Graz University of Technology, Austria in 2003. He has more than 75 pending and granted patent applications, and he has published 30 journal and conference publications and book chapters and received several inventor awards at Nokia.

[post_title] => Research Colloquium: Klaus Doppler [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-klaus-doppler [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-16 14:19:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 21:19:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8774 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8721 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-09 12:59:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 20:59:57 [post_content] =>

Congratulations, Class of 2017!

2017-graduation-banner-for-website Although you are finishing one chapter in your UW electrical engineering education, the boundless knowledge and strong foundation you have built will follow you. It will follow you through the challenging, yet rewarding careers that lie ahead. The graduation ceremony is a time to celebrate your achievements and celebrate your bright futures. Congratulations, UW EE Class of 2017!

Where

Hec Edmundson Pavillion (Hec Ed) 3870 Montlake Blvd NE Seattle, WA 98105 Please view our campus map.

When

  • Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
  • Procession begins at 7:00 p.m.
  • Ceremony concludes at 9:00 p.m.

Graduation Speaker

Dr. George Huang Dr. George Huang CEO and Chairman of FutureDial We are pleased to announce that UW EE alum Dr. George Huang (Ph.D. ’73), CEO and Chairman of FutureDial, will be this year's graduation speaker. For more information on Dr. Huang, please visit the department's news release.

Tickets

Tickets are not required for the 2017 ceremony.

Registration

The registration deadline to participate in the 2017 ceremony is May 26. The registration form will be available May 3.

Cap and Gown

Cap and gown are optional at the UW EE graduation. They may be purchased through the Registration/Order Form, May 3-21.

Disability Services

Parking Students need to contact the Office of Ceremonies to make arrangements. Guest seating There will be volunteers/staff at the front doors, who will provide directions and assist your guests with disability seating. Hec Ed is an arena, so there are plenty of wheelchair accessible seating areas.

Photographs

Your family is welcome to take photos during the event. We ask that family members remain in their seats and do not approach the stage to take pictures, as we will have a professional photographer. The professional pictures will be available on the photographer's website following the graduation ceremony.

Parking and Lodging

Parking We recommend paying to park in the E19, E12, E1 or triangle parking garage (view map).  The Link light rail is also a great alternative to avoid paying for parking and dealing with traffic. Lodging There are many lodging options around the UW campus and in Seattle. Please view the UW Transportation and Lodging page for more information.

Strollers

Guests should ask attendants for directions to the appropriate seating area.

Restrictions

No balloons are allowed into Hec Ed. [post_title] => 2017 UW EE Graduation Ceremony [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 2017-uw-ee-graduation-ceremony [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-27 16:37:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-27 23:37:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8721 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [26] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8723 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-09 12:59:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 20:59:56 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 30, 2017

More details to come!

[post_title] => UW EE Capstone Fair [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ee-capstone-fair [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-09 12:59:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-09 20:59:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8723 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [27] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8722 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 16:01:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 00:01:54 [post_content] =>

When

  • Friday, April 21, 2017 / 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 22, 2017 / 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Where

EE Building Benton Lane Seattle WA 98195 (For directions, download this PDF.)

About the Event

The UW College of Engineering's Discovery Days (April 21-22) is a great opportunity for students and families from all over the Puget Sound region to join for hands-on activities (like discovering the mechanics behind making a pickle glow and a robot shake hands). View a selection of photos from last year's Discovery Days: 2016 Discovery Days   [post_title] => Engineering Discovery Days [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => engineering-discovery-days [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-15 16:31:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-15 23:31:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8722 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [28] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8718 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:36:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:36:47 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Harnessing Microwave Signals of Opportunity for Addressing the Water Puzzle"

Quantifying stores of fresh water is of ever-increasing importance because of the rapid increase in world population while the relatively small supplies of fresh water remain fixed at best. With evident changes in the global climate, water-related issues have been identified by the intelligence community as an important factor in the US world-wide threat assessment. The first order of business is to know where and how much water there is (and where there is not). Only then will it be possible to predict the future trends in water availability and to develop adaptation strategies. The principle of microwave remote sensing has long been established as a means to quantify water resources because of the strong dependence of electromagnetic scattering in the microwave regime to the presence of water. Much of the environmental sensing work in our group has been motivated and designed based on the above recognition.  But numerous technical challenges remain in developing an affordable and capable water observing system. This talk starts by a brief description of some of the critical problems in the remote sensing of water resources today, and discusses how our research addresses several components of these problems by developing new spaceborne and airborne radar sensor technologies, as well as in-situ sensor networks. A major focus of the talk will be on the opportunistic and shared use of the microwave spectrum for devising novel water sensing systems. The emerging research for mapping profiles of soil water content (‘soil moisture’), variations in permafrost properties in the arctic and boreal regions, and ground water in arid/semiarid environments are discussed.

Speaker

Mahta MoghaddamMahta Moghaddam (University of Southern California)

Mahta Moghaddam is professor of electrical engineering at the University of Southern California (USC) Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, as well as the vice dean for research of Viterbi School of Engineering for academic year 2016-2017. Until 2011, she was on the faculty at the University of Michigan. She received her Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana, in 1991. From 1991 to 2003, she was with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California. During the past ~25 years of active involvement in environmental remote sensing, Moghaddam has introduced new approaches for quantitative interpretation of synthetic aperture radar imagery. Her most recent contributions include the development of new radar measurement technologies for subsurface and subcanopy characterization, development of forward and inverse scattering techniques for layered random media with rough interfaces, developing sensor web technologies for in-situ environmental sensing and transforming concepts of radar remote sensing to high-resolution medical imaging and therapy. She is a member of the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission Science Team, member of the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Team and the PI for AirMOSS NASA Earth Ventures Suborbital 1 Mission. She is a Fellow of IEEE and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Mahta Moghaddam [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-mahta-moghaddam [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-08 16:31:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 00:31:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8718 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [29] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8717 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:35:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:35:38 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Recent Developments in Fiber and Wireless Broadband Access Communications"

The field of broadband communications has seen tremendous growth in the last several years, driven by over-the-top video streaming, cloud computing, upcoming internet of things and 5G wireless networks.  In this presentation, we start from the internet transformation driven by datacenter networks, followed by an introduction of the Google Fiber project, our achievements and the challenges faced by the Google Fiber project.  We will also review the latest development in wire-line and wireless broadband access networks and the enabling technologies.

Speaker

Cedric Lam

Cedric Lam 林 峯 (Engineering Director, Google Access)

Cedric F. Lam was a founder of Google Fiber.  He is currently engineering director at Google Access, responsible for the planning and development of scalable and cost-effective next generation access technologies to provide diverse and abundant bandwidths.  Prior to Google Fiber, he was working on transport and interconnect technologies for Google datacenters.  Before joining Google, Lam was chief system architect at Opvista which made ultra-high density WDM transport systems.  Prior to Opvista, Lam was senior technical staff member at AT&T Labs, Broadband Access Research Department.  Lam is a Fellow of OSA.   He has a Ph.D. from UCLA and B. Eng. (First Class Honors) from University of Hong Kong, both in electrical engineering.   [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Cedric Lam (林 峯) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-cedric-lam [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-11 16:15:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-12 00:15:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8717 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [30] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8716 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:34:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:34:27 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Research journey: Scaling-up thin film solar cells and on-chip magnetic inductors for dc-to-dc power conversion"

The global energy demand is predicted to reach 28 Terawatts by 2050. Solar energy can meet a sizeable fraction of this demand. The cost of solar energy has reached 3cents/KWh, making it competitive with traditional energy choices. To harvest this energy, we propose the fabrication of thin solar cells from thin films of direct bandgap semiconductors composed of CuInGaSe2 and of earth-abundant, environmentally friendly materials. Another promising material for low cost, thin film, solar cell absorber layers is the quaternary compound of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), the equivalent of CuInS2 with Sn and Zn replacing In that is scarce and expensive. Electrodeposition of nanoscale metallic films and annealing in a selenium/sulfur atmosphere is one of the most promising, low cost methods of synthesis. Solar thin film panels are scaled to m2. We demonstrated scalability of thin film solar cells using a CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) absorber on 30 cm x 60 cm and full panel size of 60cm x 120 cm. This work enabled a 1m2/min continuous industrial scale line with 14% solar conversion efficiency panels. Monolithically integrated dc-dc power converters are enabling technologies for fine-grain power management of high performance microprocessors. Power efficiency of 90% or more is needed for many mainstream applications where the power dissipation is 100W or higher. Integrated buck converters need to be operated in a frequency range of 50-250 MHz and a very high inductor Q≥17@100MHz is required for the magnetic inductor. We have achieved magnetic inductors with the highest Q ever reported that are suitable to be used in 90% efficient silicon power converters.

Speaker

Lili Deligianni (IBM Research)

Lili DeligianniLili Deligianni is a Principal investigator & Research Scientist at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. Deligianni’s recent research interests include biosensors and bioelectronics, on-chip magnetic inductors and thin film solar cells. These are game-changing technologies which can be used in bioelectronics and power electronics with applications in digital health, mobile phones and IoT, and electric cars. Deligianni played a leading role in the successful introduction of electrochemical processes in the solder bump technology. The process became the standard in the electronic industry for joining of silicon chips to packages. She also co-invented the copper electrodeposition process for on-chip interconnects. The introduction of electroplated copper wire on silicon wafers has revolutionized the capability of computer chips. For the patents associated with the copper interconnect process, she received the 2006 Inventor of the Year Award of the New York Intellectual Property Law Association and two IBM Corporate Awards. She has co-authored 52 peer-reviewed publications and more than 130 patents and patent applications.  Lili Deligianni received her Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign and has been with IBM ever since.  She is an elected member of the IBM Academy of Technology. Deligianni served on the Board of Directors, and is the past-Secretary of the ECS.  She is a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society and has been the recipient of the Electrochemical Society Electrodeposition Research Award. She is a senior member of IEEE and of AIChE.  She is a member of AAAS.  Deligianni is also the past chair of the Watson Women’s Network and leads Engineer’s Week outreach in K-12 schools. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Lili Deligianni [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-lili-deligianni [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-28 10:02:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-28 18:02:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8716 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [_numposts:protected] => -1 [_rendered:protected] => 1 [_classes:protected] => Array ( [0] => view-block [1] => block--events [2] => block--events--home ) [_finalHTML:protected] => [_postID:protected] => [_errors:protected] => Array ( ) [_block:protected] => [_db:protected] => WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [post_type] => event [tax_query] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => event_tag [field] => slug [terms] => Array ( [0] => front-page [1] => event_tag ) ) ) [posts_per_page] => -1 [post_status] => publish ) [query_vars] => Array ( [post_type] => event [tax_query] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => event_tag [field] => slug [terms] => Array ( [0] => front-page [1] => event_tag ) ) ) [posts_per_page] => -1 [post_status] => publish [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [name] => [static] => [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [nopaging] => 1 [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => [taxonomy] => event_tag [term] => front-page [order] => DESC ) [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [taxonomy] => event_tag [terms] => Array ( [0] => front-page [1] => event_tag ) [field] => slug [operator] => IN [include_children] => 1 ) ) [relation] => AND [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( [0] => wp_term_relationships ) [queried_terms] => Array ( [event_tag] => Array ( [terms] => Array ( [0] => front-page [1] => event_tag ) [field] => slug ) ) [primary_table] => wp_posts [primary_id_column] => ID ) [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [request] => SELECT wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts LEFT JOIN wp_term_relationships ON (wp_posts.ID = wp_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (54) ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'event' AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish')) GROUP BY wp_posts.ID ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10399 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:52 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-dec-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:55:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:55:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10399 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10398 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:12 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-nov-9-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:56:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:56:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10398 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10397 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:50:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:50:25 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-oct-12-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:56:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:56:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10397 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10396 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:49:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:49:39 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-sept-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:56:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:56:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10396 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10395 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:48:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:48:48 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-aug-10-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:57:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:57:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10395 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10394 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:47:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:47:49 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, July 13, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-july-13-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:57:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:57:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10394 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10393 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:47:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:47:01 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, June 8, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-june-8-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:57:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:57:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10393 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10392 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 15:55:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 22:55:09 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, May 11, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-may-11-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:58:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:58:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10392 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10357 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-04-12 16:01:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-12 23:01:09 [post_content] =>

capstone-fair-website-header_v2

The Electrical Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone (ENGINE) program, which was rolled out in Spring 2016, offers students the mentorship of engineering professionals. Students work on industry-sponsored projects, developing their skills in innovation, systems engineering, project management and project development. Since its introductory year, the ENGINE program has already seen significant growth from interested students and local companies. Currently, more than 50 percent of the UW EE undergraduate graduating class is enrolled in the program. Students work on cutting-edge projects, including drone radar, transit apps, space communications and clean energy. On May 30, students will present their projects to peers, industry professionals and faculty.

2017 Details

When

  • Tuesday, May 30
  • 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Where

  • HUB South Ballroom

Sponsoring Companies

  • Blue Origin
  • Booz Allen Hamilton
  • dToor
  • Echodyne
  • Fluke
  • Fizikl
  • Millenium Space Systems
  • Nvidia
  • Plugable Technologies
  • Seattle Department of Transportation
  • Seattle Mountain Rescue
  • Tupl
  • UW Medicine
  • Voicebox
  • Wally Labs

Project Examples

capstone-project-examples

Registration

For Students

All students enrolled in undergraduate or graduate capstone classes are encouraged to register to present their projects at the fair.
  • Deadline:  Wednesday, April 26, 2017
  • Registration:  Via Catalyst
[post_title] => The 2017 Electrical Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone Fair [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-engineering-entrepreneurial-capstone-fair [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-17 15:55:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-17 22:55:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10357 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10313 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-07 16:12:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-07 23:12:34 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Programmable Photonic Communication Systems"

Photonics is increasingly more attractive as a technology platform for addressing technological barriers facing bedrock high technology areas including next generation microprocessors and computing platforms, high speed communication systems, wireless networks and smart cities. Integrated photonics, coupled with decades of technological maturation, is enabling more complex, multi-component photonic systems that are essential in these applications. Software control together with photonic integration in particular form a vehicle for these photonic systems to scale and find widespread application. The resultant combination of basic physical phenomena, complex material and device architectures, application requirements and software control is opening up new interdisciplinary research problems. In this talk, I will review recent technological trends around integrated photonics and data communications and computing. Fiber optical communication systems, in particular, are at the leading edge of these trends. I will describe a long standing problem facing optically switched communication networks, which is the bottleneck created by peering requirements at Internet exchange points (IXP). Software defined networking (SDN) and integrated photonic devices are used to provide an optical layer peering mechanism with service level agreement (SLA) enforcement. Using 100 Gb/s polarization multiplexed quadrature phase shift keyed (PM-QPSK) optical signals, high capacity can be delivered with low latency across multiple network domains, a critical requirement expected for 5G mobile and data center interconnection (DCI) networks.

Speaker

Dan Kilper

Daniel Kilper (University of Arizona)

Daniel Kilper is a research professor in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He holds a joint appointment in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Arizona and an adjunct faculty position in electrical engineering at Columbia University. He received a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Michigan in 1996. From 2000-2013 he was a member of technical staff at Bell Labs. Within both academia and industry, he has made contributions in the area of communication devices and networks primarily spanning three areas: energy efficient communication networks, optical performance monitoring and dynamic optical networks. He is a senior member of IEEE and is an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Green Communications and Networking and a steering committee member for the IEEE Green ICT Initiative. He currently serves as administrative director for the Center for Integrated Access Networks, an NSF Engineering Research Center and has served in leadership positions in multi-university/industry consortia including the Center for Telecommunications Value Chain Research (CTVR), Center for Energy Efficient Telecommunications (CEET) and the GreenTouch Consortium. His work has been recognized with the Bell Labs President's Gold Medal Award and he served on the Bell Labs President’s Advisory Council on Research. He holds seven patents and authored four book chapters and more than one hundred thirty peer-reviewed publications.

  [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Dan Kilper [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-dan-kilper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-11 14:07:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-11 21:07:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10313 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10230 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-03-28 11:56:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-28 18:56:57 [post_content] => Casino Night 2017 Casino Night 2017 is here!  This popular event, hosted by the student-run IEEE/HKN society, is for electrical engineering and computer science students and industry representatives only.  With both casual gaming and designated time for recruitment, the evening is a fun, relaxed environment where professionals in the field can talk personally with students about their goals and interests.  More than 80 students had the opportunity to mingle and chat with eight companies at Casino Night 2016. Light food and beverages are provided. And UW EE faculty serve as the dealers!

When & Where

For Industry

Chat with up-and-coming electrical and computer science engineers in a relaxed, fun environment!
  • Register via Eventbrite (Password: UWIEEEHKN)
  • Deadline:  April 10, 2017
  • Cost:  $100 for Casino Night 2017 / $250 for Casino Night 2017 + 1 tech talk in autumn quarter 2017
  • Questions:  Contact the IEEE/HKN officers.

For Students

Come network with company representatives from Microsoft, ESI and more over casino games and dinner!  Dress is business casual.  Resumes are strongly recommended -- you can either upload yours in advance via the Catalyst drop box or bring print copies with you.
  • Register via Eventbrite
  • Cost: Free for IEEE members; $5 for non-members.
  • Deadline:  Students can continue to register throughout the event.
[post_title] => Casino Night 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => casino-night-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-07 10:37:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-07 17:37:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10230 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10088 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-06 21:39:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-07 05:39:10 [post_content] => 2017 Puget Sound Alumni Mixer

When

  • Thursday, May 4, 2017
  • 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Where

  • Amazon Campus Van Vorst Library 426 Terry Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98109

RSVP

We're so sorry, but we've reached capacity for this event and closed registration.  To keep abreast of upcoming opportunities to connect with UW EE, please visit our Alumni page.  Hope to see you at our next Puget Sound area event!

About the Event

For the second year in a row, we are fortunate to have Vice-President of Amazon and UW EE Affiliate Professor Babak Parviz host the Department of Electrical Engineering alumni mixer at Amazon’s campus. The evening is an opportunity for guests to network with each other and meet current UW EE leadership and faculty while hearing about today’s research. Due to the overwhelming response last year, please note space is limited and registration will close when capacity has been reached. We encourage you to RSVP early. Hosts: 
rp-headhsot

Radha Poovendran Professor and Chair

Research areas: Security, biosystems and machine learning
bp-headshot

Babak Parviz VP at Amazon and Affiliate Professor

Research areas:
High-tech with social impact

Featured Faculty Members: 
pa-headshot

Payman Arabshahi Associate Professor

Research areas: Underwater and space communications
la-headhsot

Les Atlas Professor

Research areas:
Signal processing for dynamical systems

bd-headshot

Bruce Darling Professor

Research areas: Integrated sensor development
Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff

Lillian Ratliff Assistant Professor

Research areas:
Next-generation urban infrastructure systems

mr-headshot

Matt Reynolds Associate Professor

Research areas:
Smart materials, RFID and WPT

ms-headshot

Mani Soma Professor

Research areas: Mixed-signal, RF, high-frequency ICs
bz-headshot

Baosen Zhang Assistant Professor

Research areas:
Smart cities and power systems

[post_title] => The 2017 Puget Sound Alumni Mixer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-puget-sound-alumni-mixer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 13:20:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 20:20:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10088 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9893 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-02-16 16:52:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-17 00:52:54 [post_content] =>

When

Saturday, April 22 9-10:30 a.m.

Where

EE Building — Upper Basement Benton Lane Seattle WA 98195 (For directions, download this PDF.) [caption id="attachment_10483" align="aligncenter" width="625"]entrance for Discovery Days Alumni Breakfast Look for the exterior entrance as pictured on the left, then choose the doors that lead you to the UW EE administrative offices. From there, follow the signs to join us for breakfast![/caption]

RSVP

We're so sorry -- we have reached capacity and closed registration for this event.  We invite you to still visit campus to enjoy Discovery Days exhibits, and we hope you can join us for breakfast next year!

About the Event

The UW College of Engineering's Discovery Days (April 21-22) is a great opportunity for students and families from all over the Puget Sound region to join for hands-on activities (like discovering the mechanics behind making a pickle glow and a robot shake hands). The Department of Electrical Engineering will hold an exclusive breakfast for our alumni and their children or grandchildren for a sneak preview of the Discovery Days exhibits before they are open to the general public. It’s a tradition we started last year with great response from the EE community. We look forward to meeting your family at the breakfast. View a selection of photos from last year's Discovery Days: 2016 Discovery Days

Parking on Campus

Upon Arrival to Campus

  • Stop at a campus gatehouse and advise the Parking Specialist that you are attending the “EE Alumni Breakfast” in the Electrical Engineering Department.
  • A parking permit, with the closest available parking lot, will be printed and given to you to display on your vehicle's dashboard as instructed.
  • If you need disability accommodations, please advise the Parking Specialist.

 Estimated Saturday Morning Parking Rates

  • Surface Parking Lots: $5, arrival prior to 12 p.m. (noon) on Saturday.
  • Central Plaza Garage: $10, arrival prior to 12 p.m. (noon) on Saturday.
Note: If your visit is less than one hour, be sure to stop at a campus gatehouse as you exit for a prorated refund.  Please contact the Transportation Services, Events Office at 206.616.8710 or via email at tsevents@uw.edu if you have any questions or need further assistance with your parking arrangement at the University of Washington, Seattle Campus. [post_title] => The 2017 Discovery Days: Alumni Breakfast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-discovery-days-alumni-breakfast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 13:06:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 20:06:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9893 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9831 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-02-02 14:19:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-02 22:19:32 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Building Secure-Aware Cyber-Physical Systems: A Satisfiability Modulo Convex Optimization Approach"

The rapidly increasing dependence on cyber-physical systems (CPS) in building critical infrastructures — in the context of smart cities, power grids, medical devices and self-driving cars — has opened the gates to increasingly sophisticated and harmful attacks with financial, societal, criminal or political effects. While a traditional cyber-attack may leak credit-card or other personal sensitive information, a CPS-attack can lead to a loss of control in nuclear reactors, gas turbines, the power grid, transportation networks and other critical infrastructure, placing the nation’s security, economy and public safety at risk. I will start this talk by motivating for the differences between CPS-security and cyber-security. To this end, I will show experimental results on non-invasive sensor spoofing attacks targeting the anti-lock brake systems (ABS) in automobiles. As the need for CPS-security becomes evident,  I will focus on a problem known as "secure state estimation.” It aims to estimate the state of a dynamical system when an adversary arbitrarily corrupts a subset of its sensors.  Although of critical importance, this problem is NP-hard and combinatorial in nature since the subset of attacked sensors is unknown. I will show that the "secure state estimation" is a special case of a larger class of logic formulas, termed satisfiability modulo convex (SMC) formulas. I will present then a new satisfiability modulo convex procedure that uses a lazy combination of Boolean satisfiability solving and convex programming to provide a satisfying assignment or determine that the formula is unsatisfiable. I will finish by showing, through multiple experimental and simulation results that SMC solvers outperform other techniques when used to solve the secure state estimation problem.

Speaker

Yasser Shoukry

Yasser Shoukry (UC Berkeley)

Yasser Shoukry is a postdoctoral scholar at the EECS Department at UC Berkeley, the EE Department at UCLA and the ESE Department at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from UCLA in 2015 where he was affiliated with both the Cyber-Physical Systems Lab as well as the Networked and Embedded Systems Lab. Before joining UCLA, he spent four years as an R&D engineer in the industry of automotive embedded systems. His research interests include the design and implementation of secure- and privacy-aware cyber-physical systems and Internet of Things (IoT) by drawing on tools from control theory, optimization theory, embedded systems and formal methods. Shoukry is the recipient of the Best Paper Award from the International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS) in 2016. He is also the recipient of the UCLA EE Distinguished Ph.D. Dissertation Award in 2016, the UCLA Chancellors prize in 2011 and 2012, UCLA EE Graduate Division Fellowship in 2011 and 2012 and the UCLA EE Preliminary Exam Fellowship in 2012. In 2015, Shoukry led the UCLA/Caltech/CMU team to win the first place in the NSF Early Career Investigators (NSF-ECI) research challenge. His team represented the NSF-ECI in the NIST Global Cities Technology Challenge, an initiative designed to advance the deployment of IoT technologies within a smart city. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Yasser Shoukry [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-yasser-shoukry [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-08 16:32:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 00:32:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9831 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9800 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-31 13:08:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:08:07 [post_content] =>

Monday, Feb. 27, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => BSMS Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bsms-program-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 13:08:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:08:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9800 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [15] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9798 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-31 13:00:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:00:09 [post_content] =>

Are you an engineering, math or physical sciences student interested in graduate school in electrical engineering? Please join us to learn more about the daytime MSEE and Ph.D. programs in electrical engineering. Current UW EE graduate students and advisers will be available to answer questions!

Topics

  • Preparation and admissions
  • Master’s vs. Ph.D. programs
  • Degree requirements
  • Research groups
  • And more!

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017

  • 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
  [post_title] => Graduate Programs Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-programs-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 13:01:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:01:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9798 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9783 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-26 16:07:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-27 00:07:08 [post_content] =>

On-campus information sessions give prospective students an opportunity for one-on-one conversation with the Professional Programs Advising Office and faculty. Sessions provide a comprehensive overview of the Electrical Engineering Professional Master’s Program, including admissions requirements, deadlines, PMP curriculum and the PMP community. We invite you to attend!

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Stay Updated

Join the PMP mailing list to stay up to date on upcoming information sessions, application deadlines and other program activities. [post_title] => Professional Master's Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professional-masters-program-information-session-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 12:56:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 20:56:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9783 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9781 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-26 16:05:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-27 00:05:33 [post_content] =>

On-campus information sessions give prospective students an opportunity for one-on-one conversation with the Professional Programs Advising Office and faculty. Sessions provide a comprehensive overview of the Electrical Engineering Professional Master’s Program, including admissions requirements, deadlines, PMP curriculum and the PMP community. We invite you to attend!

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017

Stay Updated

Join the PMP mailing list to stay up to date on upcoming information sessions, application deadlines and other program activities. [post_title] => Professional Master's Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professional-masters-program-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 12:56:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 20:56:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9781 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9677 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-23 10:52:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-23 18:52:23 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Next-Generation Computing using Spin-Based and 2D Materials"

We are at a time where the electronics industry is feeling pressure from two sides: on the small scale we are facing the fundamental physical limits of silicon, and on the large scale we are facing new big-data applications, such as for the internet of things. The future of computing will require both more energy-efficient electronics and more big-data-driven, application-specific designs. Magnetic devices are a promising candidate for future electronics, due to their low voltage operation, nonvolatility and low thermal budget, which can open up new energy-efficient, normally-off, memory-in-computing, 3D monolithic architectures. Magnetic materials are one of the few materials systems that can be more energy efficient than silicon transistors for memory and logic, and have been shown to be more energy efficient and faster than other emerging resistive memories. Additionally, the emerging class of 2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have little to no surface roughness with monolayer thickness, and thus 2D transistors can be scaled without sacrificing mobility. They have the benefits of flexibility and low thermal budget, and new physics we can utilize such as the valley Hall effect. Thus, spin-based and 2D materials are very important classes of materials to explore for beyond-CMOS devices and systems. I will present experimental results using three-terminal spin switches to build practical magnetic logic devices and circuits and show they satisfy the requirements for beyond-CMOS devices. We show a single device can act as an inverter, and we are able to propagate bits between the spin switches to build up circuits. I will also show our work on voltage control of the spin and valley Hall effect in TMD materials, which could be used for future 2D-magnetic hybrid devices. I will discuss the future directions of this work, including building energy-efficient 3D monolithic systems of these emerging technologies, and looking further to quantum computing.

Speaker

Jean Anne Incorvia

Jean Anne Incorvia (Stanford University)

Jean Anne C. Incorvia is a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford University in electrical engineering and a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley electrical engineering and computer science. She received her Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University in 2015, cross-registered at MIT, where she was a Department of Energy Graduate Student Fellow. She received her bachelor’s in physics from UC Berkeley in 2008. Her research focuses on emerging materials and devices for nanoelectronics. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Jean Anne Incorvia [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-jean-anne-incorvia [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-23 10:53:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-23 18:53:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9677 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9648 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-13 15:43:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-13 23:43:53 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Connectivity Meets Computing: A Wireless Networking Perspective"

Networks of tomorrow are more about “user quality of experience” than they are about “network quality of service.” Wireless mobile networks, being an integral part of such a vision, will need to evolve from their current generation (4G LTE) to a more radical one (5G) to cater to such expectations. While connectivity will continue being a key enabler in such a transformation, one cannot ignore the confluence of connectivity and computing that is pervading the mobile ecosystem, both on the user side (e.g. smart phones, wearables) as well as on the network side (e.g. software-defined mobile networks). This talk will draw from some of my works that aim to push the envelope in connectivity as well as its confluence with computing from the perspective of wireless networks. In the space of connectivity, I will motivate the need for a radically new wireless access paradigm called “Access Asynchronously, Transmit Synchronously” (A2TS) to meet the demands of future 5G networks. A2TS brings together the best of two highly disparate wireless technologies — asynchronous Wi-Fi that enables scalable, coexistence-friendly deployments and synchronous LTE that delivers superior performance through advanced wireless techniques. I will discuss how to design the A2TS access paradigm from first principles, and then illustrate its real-world potential by building a scalable, network MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output) system using 802.11ac access points. In leveraging the synergy between connectivity and computing, I will highlight the growing importance of clouddriven radio access networks (C-RANs), especially for dense deployments (e.g. event centers, stadiums, urban hot-spots); then introduce the notion of a “software-defined front-haul” (SDF) network that we developed for C-RANs. I will show why SDFs are the key to unlocking the true potential of SDN in wireless access and how they can be dynamically orchestrated to not only optimize individual user and traffic performance, but also contribute to green (energy-efficient) computing in the network. I will conclude by sharing some thoughts on how mobile connectivity and computing need to evolve to support the heterogeneous demands and diversity of future mobile services that range from massive scale IoT to mobile augmented/virtual reality.

Speaker

Karthik Sundaresan

Karthik Sundaresan (NEC Labs America)

Karthikeyan Sundaresan is a senior researcher in the mobile communications and networking research department at NEC Labs America. He received his MS and Ph.D. From the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech. His research interests are broadly in wireless networking and mobile computing, and span both algorithm design as well as system prototyping. He is the recipient of several best paper awards at prestigious ACM and IEEE conferences (MobiHoc, CoNEXT, ICNP, SECON), and is the recipient of ACM Sigmobile’s Rockstar award (2016) for early career contributions to the field of mobile computing. He holds over twenty patents and received a business contribution award from NEC for the technology commercialization of a wireless interference management solution for LTE small-cells. He is a senior member of IEEE and currently serves as an associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Karthik Sundaresan [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-karthik-sundaresan [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-13 15:45:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-13 23:45:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9648 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8778 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 13:16:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 21:16:15 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 9, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Speaker

Grad Showcase

[gallery columns="4" link="none" display="portfolio" ids="10496,10497,10498,10499,10500,10501,10502"] [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Grad Showcase [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-grad-showcase [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-25 15:26:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-25 22:26:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8778 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8777 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:24:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:24:27 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 23, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Speaker

Rafael Piestun

University of Colorado [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Rafael Piestun [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-rafael-piestun [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-20 09:32:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:32:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8777 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8776 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:22:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:22:23 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 18, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Silicon-based Integrated Sensors and Systems with On-chip Antennas: From Picosecond Pulse Radiators to Miniaturized Spectrometers"

Today's silicon process technology makes it possible to integrate everything from antennas to processors on a single chip at almost no cost. This creates new opportunities for implementing complex sensors and systems on a millimeter scale. To create such devices, an understanding of physics, waves, electromagnetics and high-frequency electronics is essential. In this presentation, I will show how the convergence of these fields has resulted in single-chip picosecond pulse radiators, wirelessly synchronized chips with sub-psec synchronization accuracy, miniaturized spectrometers and wirelessly powered sensors and actuators. In the first section of the talk, I will present techniques for generating and detecting picosecond pulses, based on a novel laser-free Digital-to-Impulse (D2I) radiation. This technology can produce broadband pulses with a record width of 1.9psec that cover a frequency spectrum from 30GHz to 1.1THz and that have a resolution of 2Hz at 1THz. I will discuss how this technology enables us to perform broadband THz spectroscopy, hyper-spectral 3D imaging and Tbits/sec wireless communication. In the second part, I will present my work on precision time transfer and wireless synchronization of widely spaced chips. This technique eliminates the wires between the elements of a distributed array and makes it possible to build a highly flexible large aperture. In this section, I will also present my work on optical locking of microwave oscillators, which achieves a picosecond timing accuracy over a 1.5m distance. In the third section of the talk, I will focus on miniaturized spectrometers and sensors. I will discuss an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometer that is based on a single-chip full-duplex transceiver for detecting paramagnetic chemicals and free radicals. The EPR sensor technology developed in my laboratory has been successfully deployed in major oil and gas fields in the United States and Canada. This technology is used to monitor the concentration of asphaltenes (a chemical that clogs oil wells) in real-time and to minimize the use of environmentally hazardous chemical inhibitors in energy production. I will further present my recent work on wirelessly powered microchips with on-chip antennas. These microchips are designed to perform sensing, actuation and localization. I will provide examples of such microchips being used to pace the heart of a sheep and to trigger the leg movement of a rat. Finally, I will discuss the future directions of my research on building wirelessly powered single-chip electronic drugs for medical applications and electronic tracers for energy exploration as well as for industrial monitoring.

Speaker

Aydin Babakhani

Aydin Babakhani (Rice University)

Aydin Babakhani is a Louis Owen Junior Chair Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rice University and the director of Rice Integrated Systems and Circuits Laboratory. He received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology in 2003 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Caltech in 2005 and 2008, respectively. He was a postdoctoral scholar at Caltech in 2009 and a research scientist at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 2010. Babakhani has been awarded multiple best paper awards, including the Best Paper Award at the IEEE SiRF conference in 2016, the Best Paper Award at the IEEE RWS Symposium in 2015, the Best Paper Award at the IEEE IMS Symposium in 2014 and 2nd place in the Best Paper Awards at the IEEE APS Symposium 2016 and IEEE IMS Symposium 2016. He has published more than 85 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings and has 21 issued or pending patents. His research is supported by NSF, DARPA, AFOSR, ONR, the W. M. Keck Foundation, SRC and more than 10 companies. He received a prestigious NSF CAREER award in 2015, an Innovation Award from Northrop Grumman in 2014 and a DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2012. He also received the Caltech Electrical Engineering Department's Charles Wilts Best PhD Thesis Prize for his work titled “Near-Field Direct Antenna Modulation.” He was the recipient of the Microwave Graduate Fellowship in 2007, the Grand Prize in the Stanford–Berkeley–Caltech Innovators Challenge in 2006, the Analog Devices Inc. Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2005, as well as a Caltech Special Institute Fellowship and an Atwood Fellowship in 2003. He was also the Gold Medal winner at both the National Physics Competition in 1998 and the 30th International Physics Olympiad in Padova, Italy, in 1999. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Aydin Babakhani [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-aydin-babakhani [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-07 09:28:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-07 16:28:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8776 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8775 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:20:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:20:54 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 4, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Natural User Interface (NUI) has finally arrived!"

On March 2, 1992, Casper was introduced by Dr. Kai-Fu Lee at Apple on Good Morning America as the first speaker-independent continuous speech recognizer which could interact with human. Apple was too far ahead of time. The technology was not quite there. In 2004, Dr. Lee tried it again at Microsoft, advocating "NUI" (pronounced as /n uw iy/) or Natural User Interface and it was shut down once more. It wasn’t until 2010, after iPhone took over the world, that a personal assistant like Siri shed its light. The advancement and ubiquitous appearance of mobile devices renders NUI a great deal of sense, as typing on small devices is painful. The breakthrough deep neural network (DNN) in 2012 brought speech and image recognition accuracy to a new territory and rallied both research and industry. From then on, artificial intelligence (AI) is finally awake and large. Established companies and startups alike are placing their bets, hoping to be at the forefront of this evolution. Mobvoi, as an established startup, is one of these firms which are determined to play an important role in this historical evolution. I will talk about what our company does and what our vision is, and present some technical work we’ve built along the way.

Speaker

Mei-Yuh HwangMei-Yuh Huang (Mobvoi)

Mei-Yuh Hwang obtained her Ph.D. in computer science in 1993 from Carnegie Mellon University. She learned the core of speech recognition from Dr. Kai-Fu Lee and Raj Reddy. After graduation, she worked at Microsoft Research, later Microsoft speech products, Bing Translation and Chinese Cortana, while serving as a researcher at University of Washington in 2004-2008. Her publications include speech recognition, machine translation and language understanding in the major conferences, IEEE journals, and U.S. patents. She joined Mobvoi in 2016 and is leading its R&D division in Redmond, Washington. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Mei-Yuh Huang [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-mei-yuh-huang [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-28 10:22:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-28 17:22:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8775 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [24] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8774 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:19:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:19:25 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, March 28, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

The wireless industry has put out a vision of 5G enabling extreme mobile broadband with peak data rates of more than 10Gbps, ultra-low latency with end-to-end latencies of less than 1ms and ultra-reliability to support mission critical applications. Current cellular networks that have been designed for human interactions and latencies of 100ms will transform into networks designed for real-time machine-to-machine interactions. In this talk, I will introduce 5G, discuss applications enabled by 5G, where to find spectrum for 5G and present some recent results in indoor environments.

Speaker

Klaus Doppler (Nokia)

_dsc0264n

Klaus Doppler joined Nokia in 2002. He has contributed to Nokia’s 4G, 5G and Wi-Fi research in multiple roles. Currently, he is heading the Connectivity Lab in Nokia Bell Labs and his research focus is on indoor networks. In the past, he has been responsible for the wireless research and standardization (4G, 5G, Wi-Fi) in Nokia Technologies, incubated a new business line, contributed to Nokia’s radio technology vision and has led various research projects. He has pioneered research on Device-to-Device Communications underlaying LTE networks. Klaus received his Ph.D. from Helsinki University of Technology, Finland in 2010 and his MSc. in Electrical Engineering from Graz University of Technology, Austria in 2003. He has more than 75 pending and granted patent applications, and he has published 30 journal and conference publications and book chapters and received several inventor awards at Nokia.

[post_title] => Research Colloquium: Klaus Doppler [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-klaus-doppler [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-16 14:19:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 21:19:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8774 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8721 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-09 12:59:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 20:59:57 [post_content] =>

Congratulations, Class of 2017!

2017-graduation-banner-for-website Although you are finishing one chapter in your UW electrical engineering education, the boundless knowledge and strong foundation you have built will follow you. It will follow you through the challenging, yet rewarding careers that lie ahead. The graduation ceremony is a time to celebrate your achievements and celebrate your bright futures. Congratulations, UW EE Class of 2017!

Where

Hec Edmundson Pavillion (Hec Ed) 3870 Montlake Blvd NE Seattle, WA 98105 Please view our campus map.

When

  • Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
  • Procession begins at 7:00 p.m.
  • Ceremony concludes at 9:00 p.m.

Graduation Speaker

Dr. George Huang Dr. George Huang CEO and Chairman of FutureDial We are pleased to announce that UW EE alum Dr. George Huang (Ph.D. ’73), CEO and Chairman of FutureDial, will be this year's graduation speaker. For more information on Dr. Huang, please visit the department's news release.

Tickets

Tickets are not required for the 2017 ceremony.

Registration

The registration deadline to participate in the 2017 ceremony is May 26. The registration form will be available May 3.

Cap and Gown

Cap and gown are optional at the UW EE graduation. They may be purchased through the Registration/Order Form, May 3-21.

Disability Services

Parking Students need to contact the Office of Ceremonies to make arrangements. Guest seating There will be volunteers/staff at the front doors, who will provide directions and assist your guests with disability seating. Hec Ed is an arena, so there are plenty of wheelchair accessible seating areas.

Photographs

Your family is welcome to take photos during the event. We ask that family members remain in their seats and do not approach the stage to take pictures, as we will have a professional photographer. The professional pictures will be available on the photographer's website following the graduation ceremony.

Parking and Lodging

Parking We recommend paying to park in the E19, E12, E1 or triangle parking garage (view map).  The Link light rail is also a great alternative to avoid paying for parking and dealing with traffic. Lodging There are many lodging options around the UW campus and in Seattle. Please view the UW Transportation and Lodging page for more information.

Strollers

Guests should ask attendants for directions to the appropriate seating area.

Restrictions

No balloons are allowed into Hec Ed. [post_title] => 2017 UW EE Graduation Ceremony [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 2017-uw-ee-graduation-ceremony [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-27 16:37:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-27 23:37:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8721 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [26] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8723 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-09 12:59:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 20:59:56 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 30, 2017

More details to come!

[post_title] => UW EE Capstone Fair [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ee-capstone-fair [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-09 12:59:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-09 20:59:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8723 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [27] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8722 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 16:01:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 00:01:54 [post_content] =>

When

  • Friday, April 21, 2017 / 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 22, 2017 / 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Where

EE Building Benton Lane Seattle WA 98195 (For directions, download this PDF.)

About the Event

The UW College of Engineering's Discovery Days (April 21-22) is a great opportunity for students and families from all over the Puget Sound region to join for hands-on activities (like discovering the mechanics behind making a pickle glow and a robot shake hands). View a selection of photos from last year's Discovery Days: 2016 Discovery Days   [post_title] => Engineering Discovery Days [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => engineering-discovery-days [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-15 16:31:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-15 23:31:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8722 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [28] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8718 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:36:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:36:47 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Harnessing Microwave Signals of Opportunity for Addressing the Water Puzzle"

Quantifying stores of fresh water is of ever-increasing importance because of the rapid increase in world population while the relatively small supplies of fresh water remain fixed at best. With evident changes in the global climate, water-related issues have been identified by the intelligence community as an important factor in the US world-wide threat assessment. The first order of business is to know where and how much water there is (and where there is not). Only then will it be possible to predict the future trends in water availability and to develop adaptation strategies. The principle of microwave remote sensing has long been established as a means to quantify water resources because of the strong dependence of electromagnetic scattering in the microwave regime to the presence of water. Much of the environmental sensing work in our group has been motivated and designed based on the above recognition.  But numerous technical challenges remain in developing an affordable and capable water observing system. This talk starts by a brief description of some of the critical problems in the remote sensing of water resources today, and discusses how our research addresses several components of these problems by developing new spaceborne and airborne radar sensor technologies, as well as in-situ sensor networks. A major focus of the talk will be on the opportunistic and shared use of the microwave spectrum for devising novel water sensing systems. The emerging research for mapping profiles of soil water content (‘soil moisture’), variations in permafrost properties in the arctic and boreal regions, and ground water in arid/semiarid environments are discussed.

Speaker

Mahta MoghaddamMahta Moghaddam (University of Southern California)

Mahta Moghaddam is professor of electrical engineering at the University of Southern California (USC) Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, as well as the vice dean for research of Viterbi School of Engineering for academic year 2016-2017. Until 2011, she was on the faculty at the University of Michigan. She received her Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana, in 1991. From 1991 to 2003, she was with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California. During the past ~25 years of active involvement in environmental remote sensing, Moghaddam has introduced new approaches for quantitative interpretation of synthetic aperture radar imagery. Her most recent contributions include the development of new radar measurement technologies for subsurface and subcanopy characterization, development of forward and inverse scattering techniques for layered random media with rough interfaces, developing sensor web technologies for in-situ environmental sensing and transforming concepts of radar remote sensing to high-resolution medical imaging and therapy. She is a member of the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission Science Team, member of the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Team and the PI for AirMOSS NASA Earth Ventures Suborbital 1 Mission. She is a Fellow of IEEE and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Mahta Moghaddam [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-mahta-moghaddam [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-08 16:31:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 00:31:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8718 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [29] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8717 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:35:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:35:38 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Recent Developments in Fiber and Wireless Broadband Access Communications"

The field of broadband communications has seen tremendous growth in the last several years, driven by over-the-top video streaming, cloud computing, upcoming internet of things and 5G wireless networks.  In this presentation, we start from the internet transformation driven by datacenter networks, followed by an introduction of the Google Fiber project, our achievements and the challenges faced by the Google Fiber project.  We will also review the latest development in wire-line and wireless broadband access networks and the enabling technologies.

Speaker

Cedric Lam

Cedric Lam 林 峯 (Engineering Director, Google Access)

Cedric F. Lam was a founder of Google Fiber.  He is currently engineering director at Google Access, responsible for the planning and development of scalable and cost-effective next generation access technologies to provide diverse and abundant bandwidths.  Prior to Google Fiber, he was working on transport and interconnect technologies for Google datacenters.  Before joining Google, Lam was chief system architect at Opvista which made ultra-high density WDM transport systems.  Prior to Opvista, Lam was senior technical staff member at AT&T Labs, Broadband Access Research Department.  Lam is a Fellow of OSA.   He has a Ph.D. from UCLA and B. Eng. (First Class Honors) from University of Hong Kong, both in electrical engineering.   [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Cedric Lam (林 峯) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-cedric-lam [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-11 16:15:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-12 00:15:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8717 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [30] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8716 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:34:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:34:27 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Research journey: Scaling-up thin film solar cells and on-chip magnetic inductors for dc-to-dc power conversion"

The global energy demand is predicted to reach 28 Terawatts by 2050. Solar energy can meet a sizeable fraction of this demand. The cost of solar energy has reached 3cents/KWh, making it competitive with traditional energy choices. To harvest this energy, we propose the fabrication of thin solar cells from thin films of direct bandgap semiconductors composed of CuInGaSe2 and of earth-abundant, environmentally friendly materials. Another promising material for low cost, thin film, solar cell absorber layers is the quaternary compound of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), the equivalent of CuInS2 with Sn and Zn replacing In that is scarce and expensive. Electrodeposition of nanoscale metallic films and annealing in a selenium/sulfur atmosphere is one of the most promising, low cost methods of synthesis. Solar thin film panels are scaled to m2. We demonstrated scalability of thin film solar cells using a CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) absorber on 30 cm x 60 cm and full panel size of 60cm x 120 cm. This work enabled a 1m2/min continuous industrial scale line with 14% solar conversion efficiency panels. Monolithically integrated dc-dc power converters are enabling technologies for fine-grain power management of high performance microprocessors. Power efficiency of 90% or more is needed for many mainstream applications where the power dissipation is 100W or higher. Integrated buck converters need to be operated in a frequency range of 50-250 MHz and a very high inductor Q≥17@100MHz is required for the magnetic inductor. We have achieved magnetic inductors with the highest Q ever reported that are suitable to be used in 90% efficient silicon power converters.

Speaker

Lili Deligianni (IBM Research)

Lili DeligianniLili Deligianni is a Principal investigator & Research Scientist at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. Deligianni’s recent research interests include biosensors and bioelectronics, on-chip magnetic inductors and thin film solar cells. These are game-changing technologies which can be used in bioelectronics and power electronics with applications in digital health, mobile phones and IoT, and electric cars. Deligianni played a leading role in the successful introduction of electrochemical processes in the solder bump technology. The process became the standard in the electronic industry for joining of silicon chips to packages. She also co-invented the copper electrodeposition process for on-chip interconnects. The introduction of electroplated copper wire on silicon wafers has revolutionized the capability of computer chips. For the patents associated with the copper interconnect process, she received the 2006 Inventor of the Year Award of the New York Intellectual Property Law Association and two IBM Corporate Awards. She has co-authored 52 peer-reviewed publications and more than 130 patents and patent applications.  Lili Deligianni received her Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign and has been with IBM ever since.  She is an elected member of the IBM Academy of Technology. Deligianni served on the Board of Directors, and is the past-Secretary of the ECS.  She is a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society and has been the recipient of the Electrochemical Society Electrodeposition Research Award. She is a senior member of IEEE and of AIChE.  She is a member of AAAS.  Deligianni is also the past chair of the Watson Women’s Network and leads Engineer’s Week outreach in K-12 schools. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Lili Deligianni [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-lili-deligianni [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-28 10:02:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-28 18:02:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8716 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 31 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10399 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:52 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => EE Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ee-undergraduate-prospective-information-session-dec-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-14 16:55:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:55:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10399 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 31 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => 1 [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 1ed8b97f0d2d9ad50ff42e6f2d720a68 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )

News and Announcements