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Baosen Zhang appointed as Keith and Nancy Rattie Endowed Career Development Professor

The professorship supports the growth of the department's power and energy group, focusing on creative solutions to the world's power crisis.

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Baosen Zhang appointed as Keith and Nancy Rattie Endowed Career Development Professor Banner

Professor Kirschen discusses renewable energy for Puerto Rico on NPR's Marketplace

Professor Daniel Kirschen speaks with NPR's Marketplace about the possibility of rebuilding post-hurricane Puerto Rico around renewable energy.

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Professor Kirschen discusses renewable energy for Puerto Rico on NPR's Marketplace Banner

CMMB Vision honored at 2017 UW Recognition Gala

CMMB was honored at the September 8 UW Recognition Gala for their partnership with UW EE and support in establishing the CMMB Vision-UW EE Center on Satellite Multimedia and Connected Vehicles.

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CMMB Vision honored at 2017 UW Recognition Gala Banner

UW EE hosts the 10th Annual Dean W. Lytle Lecture

In his speech, Professor Heath addressed the need of millimeter waves to expand the dwindling space of our current electromagnetic spectrum. He explored applications from cars to drones to even deep sea communications.

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UW EE hosts the 10th Annual Dean W. Lytle Lecture Banner

New CMMB-UW EE Center on Satellite Multimedia and Connected Vehicles launches

The new center forges cutting-edge solutions that enable the delivery of information to people around the world at unprecedented speed, scale, and low cost, building the next-generation of smart cars and ubiquitous connectivity.

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New CMMB-UW EE Center on Satellite Multimedia and Connected Vehicles launches Banner

Dr. Lisa Zurk to join UW EE as a full professor, the Applied Physics Laboratory as Executive Director

Dr. Zurk will be the next Executive Director of the APL-UW and a professor within the Department of Electrical Engineering. This appointment further fosters strong collaborative ties between the APL-UW and UW EE.

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Dr. Lisa Zurk to join UW EE as a full professor, the Applied Physics Laboratory as Executive Director Banner

Welcome, students!

Whether you are returning to UW EE for another year or are new to these innovative halls, we are so excited to have you with us.

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Welcome, students! Banner

New $15.6M NSF-funded center founded at the UW

The new Molecular Engineering Materials Center supports excellence in research, education and training in materials science. UW EE Professors Kai-Me Fu and Scott Dunham were a part of the core faculty that led the efforts to secure and establish the new national center.

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New $15.6M NSF-funded center founded at the UW Banner

UW and China’s Tsinghua University launch groundbreaking Global Innovation Exchange

The UW and Tsinghua University joined forces to establish GIX in Bellevue. The space prototypes new technologies as one of the largest and most advanced maker spaces in the region.

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UW and China’s Tsinghua University launch groundbreaking Global Innovation Exchange Banner

Faculty receive Ubicomp's 10-Year Impact Award

UW professors, including Electrical Engineering Professors Shwetak Patel and Matt Reynolds, have been recognized at Ubicomp 2017 for the influential paper they wrote in 2007.

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Faculty receive Ubicomp's 10-Year Impact Award Banner

Wireless communications expert Robert Heath leads this year’s Dean W. Lytle Lecture

As a part of the 2017 Lytle Lecture, University of Texas at Austin Professor Robert Heath will explore mmWave communication as an incubator for the rebirth of wireless communications.

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Wireless communications expert Robert Heath leads this year’s Dean W. Lytle Lecture Banner

Researchers achieve groundbreaking communication of low-power devices over long distances

The engineers demonstrated for the first time that devices that operate at almost zero power can transmit data up to nearly two miles, breaking all previously-established barriers.

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Researchers achieve groundbreaking communication of low-power devices over long distances Banner

New hire, Brian Johnson, brings expertise in power electronics

This spring, Dr. Johnson will will advance UW EE's research in power and energy systems by introducing new courses and research in power electronics.

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New hire, Brian Johnson, brings expertise in power electronics Banner

Professor Sumit Roy receives Best Paper at 2017 WNS3 Workshop

UW EE's quiet but consistent work on ns-3 has garnered a top paper award for Professor Sumit Roy and co-authors.

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Professor Sumit Roy receives Best Paper at 2017 WNS3 Workshop Banner

UW researchers developing a smartphone app to screen for concussion and brain injury

Associate Professor Shwetak Patel and a team from UbiComp Lab are developing PupilScreen, a smartphone app to screen for concussion.

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UW researchers developing a smartphone app to screen for concussion and brain injury Banner
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                    [post_content] => Capstone Pitch Day 2017 header

 

Industry Pitch Day is your opportunity to present a project to an audience of UW EE seniors in ENGINE — our entrepreneurial capstone program. Projects have covered an amazing spectrum from sensors to spaceflight to machine learning/AI and more!

When & Where

  • Wednesday, Oct. 25, 4:30–7 p.m.
  • Please check-in between 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
  • Kane Hall 225 (Walker-Ames Room)

Register

We're looking forward to seeing your company's project at pitch day!  To confirm your attendance, please register in advance.  You're welcome to register up to six representatives.
  • Registration
  • Deadline:  Sunday, Oct. 22, 11:45 p.m. (Pacific Time)

Parking

Parking is complimentary for industry representatives. Please review the parking instructions here.

Contact

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When & Where

RSVP

Please RSVP for the open house with Professional & Continuing Education. [post_title] => UW EE Professional Master's @ Open House: UW Grad Programs for Professionals [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => pce-open-house-autumn-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-03 13:58:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-03 20:58:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11525 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11469 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-25 17:16:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-26 00:16:07 [post_content] =>

When

Tuesday, October 10, 2017 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Where

EEB 105 Electrical Engineering Building

Speaker

Vladimir Stojanovic 

Biography

Vladimir Stojanovic is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include design, modeling and optimization of integrated systems, from CMOS-based VLSI blocks and interfaces to system design with emerging devices like NEM relays and silicon-photonics. He is also interested in design and implementation of energy-efficient electrical and optical networks, and digital communication techniques in high-speed interfaces and high-speed mixed-signal IC design.Prof. Stojanovic received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2005, and the Dipl. Ing. degree from the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1998. He was also with Rambus, Inc., Los Altos, CA, from 2001 through 2004 and with MIT as Associate Professor from 2005-2013. He received the 2006 IBM Faculty Partnership Award, and the 2009 NSF CAREER Award as well as the 2008 ICCAD William J. McCalla, 2008 IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging, and 2010 ISSCC Jack Raper best paper awards. He was an IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society Distinguished Lecturer for the 2012-2013 term.

Talk

"Colloquium - More-than-Moore with Integrated Silicon-Photonics" In this talk, Professor Stojanovic will present the latest results on the integration of silicon-photonic interconnects into a monolithic platform (45nm SOI logic process and bulk CMOS memory periphery process). These include world’s first microprocessor communicating to the outside world with monolithically integrated Si-Photonic devices, as well as first demonstrations of photonics in bulk CMOS processes. Prof. Stojanovic will also illustrate some critical aspects of this technology that need to be addressed from integration, circuits and systems side, in order to realize the full energy-efficiency and bandwidth-density potential of this technology. Moreover, just like integrating the inductor into CMOS in 1990s revolutionized the RF design and enabled mobile revolution, integration of silicon-photonic active and passive devices with CMOS is greatly positioned to revolutionize a number of analog and mixed-signal applications – low-phase noise signal sources, large bandwidth, high-resolution ADCs, and photonic phase arrays, to name a few. [post_title] => Colloquium - More-than-Moore with Integrated Silicon-Photonics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => colloquium-more-than-moore-with-integrated-silicon-photonics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-25 17:16:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-26 00:16:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11469 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11465 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-25 16:52:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-25 23:52:34 [post_content] =>

When

Tuesday, October 3, 2017 10:30-11:30 a.m. PST

Where

EEB 105 Electrical Engineering Building

Speaker

Dr. Robert Heath

Robert Heath

Biography

Robert W. Heath Jr. received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He is a Cullen Trust for Higher Education Endowed Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is a member of the Wireless Networking and Communications Group. He is also the president and CEO of MIMO Wireless Inc. and chief innovation officer at Kuma Signals LLC. Heath is a recipient of the 2012 Signal Processing Magazine Best Paper award, a 2013 Signal Processing Society best paper award, the 2014 EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing best paper award, the 2014 Journal of Communications and Networks best paper award, the 2016 IEEE Communications Society Fred W. Ellersick Prize and the 2016 IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award. His books include “Introduction to Wireless Digital Communication” (Prentice Hall; 2017), “Digital Wireless Communication: Physical Layer Exploration Lab Using the NI USRP” (National Technology and Science Press; 2012) and “Millimeter Wave Wireless Communications” (co-author; Prentice Hall; 2014). Heath is a licensed amateur radio operator, a registered professional engineer in Texas and a Fellow of IEEE.

Talk

'Millimeter Wave communication using out-of-band information"

Abstract

The overhead associated with establishing and operating the link is a major source of inefficiency in millimeter wave communication systems.  One significant source of overhead is the time spent training the transmit and receive beams, which occurs during estimation, feedback, channel tracking. Fortunately, there is side information available through sensing or communication available in bands outside of the millimeter wave communication band. This talk explains why beam configuration in millimeter wave systems is a major source of overhead. It then shows how out-of-band information can be used to reduce that overhead. Different types of out-of-band data are described including position, channel state information derived from another communication band, and sensing in the form of radar and video. Examples of the application of out-of-band information are shown including leveraging inverse finger printing and weighted compressed beam training.

[post_title] => Colloquium - Millimeter Wave communication using out-of-band information [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => colloquium-millimeter-wave-communication-using-out-of-band-information [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-25 16:52:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-25 23:52:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11465 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11390 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-19 09:13:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:13:31 [post_content] => Welcome to UW EE!  Please join us for our 2017 Graduate Student Orientation to meet with faculty, staff and fellow graduate students.  Over two days we’ll introduce you to the department, with speakers ranging from UW EE faculty and advisers to the Graduate Student Association, and to the UW campus, with speakers including campus police and representatives from the academic student employee union.

Tuesday’s agenda

  • 9–9:30 a.m.  Continental breakfast.  Kane 225.
  • 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.  TA training (required for all new Ph.D. candidates).  Kane 225.
  • 12:30–12:50 p.m.  Lunch.  Kane 225.
  • 12:50–1 p.m.  Welcome by Radha Poovendran, UW EE Professor and Chair.  Kane 225.
  • 1–2 p.m.  Faculty panel.  Kane 225.
  • 2–2:30 p.m.  Safety (with UW Police).  Kane 225.
  • 2:30–3 p.m.  UAW Local 4121 — Academic student employee union.  Kane 225.
  • 3–3:45 p.m.  Break.  Kane 225.
  • 3:45–4:30 p.m.  Faculty research overview.  Kane 225.
  • 4:30–6 p.m.  Faculty and student social — with games and refreshments!  Sylvan Grove (if rain — EEB Second Floor Atrium).

Locations

[post_title] => Graduate Student Orientation 2017 -- Tuesday [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-orientation-2017-tuesday [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 09:17:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:17:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11390 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11389 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-19 09:06:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:06:50 [post_content] => Welcome to UW EE!  Please join us for our 2017 Graduate Student Orientation to meet with faculty, staff and fellow graduate students.  Over two days we'll introduce you to the department, with speakers ranging from UW EE faculty and advisers to the Graduate Student Association, and to the UW campus, with speakers including campus police and representatives from the academic student employee union.

Monday's agenda

  • 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.  Campus tour (optional).  Meet in the Paul Allen Center Atrium by the UW EE main office.
  • 1–2 p.m.  Welcome to UW EE (with faculty and advising staff).  EEB 303.
  • 2–3:30 p.m.  Welcome by UW EE's Graduate Student Association (GSA).  EEB 303.
  • 3:30-5 p.m.  Scavenger hunt with the GSA.
  • 5–10 p.m.  GSA social with new and current graduate students.  Gas Works Park.

Locations

[post_title] => Graduate Student Orientation 2017 -- Monday [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-orientation-2017-monday [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 09:16:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:16:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11389 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11388 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-18 17:45:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 00:45:59 [post_content] => Welcome to EE! Our departmental orientation will provide great opportunities to meet faculty, tour labs, connect with student organizations and staff and to mingle with other newly admitted EE students. It is free, lunch will be provided and it is the best way to start your time in EE!

When & Where

  • Monday, Sept. 25th
  • 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.  Please arrive between 10:45 and 10:55 a.m.
  • EEB Room 125
[post_title] => Undergraduate Orientation 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-orientation-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 09:31:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:31:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11388 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11387 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-18 17:27:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 00:27:59 [post_content] => We're excited to welcome you to the department and give you an opportunity to connect with our PMP faculty, staff and fellow students! In addition to a meet and greet over hors d'oeuvres and drinks, you'll hear directly from our faculty about the classes they're teaching in the program this upcoming year. We'll then cover all the nuts and bolts of the PMP including degree requirements, registration, Husky Card basics and computing resources. Finally, you'll hear from some of our current students and recent graduates on their experiences in the program. We'll leave plenty of time for questions as well.

When & Where

  • Wednesday, Sept. 20
  • 6–8 p.m.
  • UW Club – Cascade Room
[post_title] => PMP Orientation 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => pmp-orientation-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-18 17:28:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 00:28:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11387 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11208 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-08-17 23:26:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-18 06:26:16 [post_content] => The Dean W. Lytle Electrical Engineering Endowed Lecture Series is the Department of Electrical Engineering's premiere annual event, featuring internationally-renowned researchers in the field of communications and signal processing. Lectures are free and open to the public.

When & Where

RSVP

Please RSVP for the Lytle Lecture here.

Talk

"Millimeter Wave Communication: From Origins to Disruptive Applications"

Millimeter wave (mmWave) communication has become an incubator for the rebirth of wireless communications. It is already being used in commercial applications such as WLAN, and trials of mmWave technology for 5G are underway.  Robert Heath believes that mmWave is also a conduit for revolutionary applications that require high data rate and low latency. In this talk, Heath explains the concepts of  bandwidth, data rate, latency and MIMO communication, which are essential to understanding the benefits provided by mmWave technology. Heath reviews the history and evolution of mmWave technology from its origins to the present day. He concludes by proposing disruptive applications of mmWave to areas such as vehicular and aerial communications, wearable networks, robotics and factory automation.

Speaker

Robert Heath (The University of Texas at Austin)

Robert W. Heath Jr. received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He is a Cullen Trust for Higher Education Endowed Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is a member of the Wireless Networking and Communications Group. He is also the president and CEO of MIMO Wireless Inc. and chief innovation officer at Kuma Signals LLC. Heath is a recipient of the 2012 Signal Processing Magazine Best Paper award, a 2013 Signal Processing Society best paper award, the 2014 EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing best paper award, the 2014 Journal of Communications and Networks best paper award, the 2016 IEEE Communications Society Fred W. Ellersick Prize and the 2016 IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award. His books include "Introduction to Wireless Digital Communication” (Prentice Hall; 2017), "Digital Wireless Communication: Physical Layer Exploration Lab Using the NI USRP” (National Technology and Science Press; 2012) and “Millimeter Wave Wireless Communications” (co-author; Prentice Hall; 2014). Heath is a licensed amateur radio operator, a registered professional engineer in Texas and a Fellow of IEEE. [post_title] => 2017 Dean W. Lytle Lecture [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => lytle2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-25 14:33:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-25 21:33:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11208 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11163 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-08-03 16:29:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-03 23:29:03 [post_content] =>

Special Seminar: Leveraging Advances in Computational Electrodynamics to Enable New Kinds of Nanophotonic Devices

When

September 7, 2017 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Where

Electrical Engineering Building, room 303

Abstract

Advances in computational electrodynamics have the potential to enable fundamentally new kinds of nanophotonic devices which are based principally on complex, non-analytical wave-interference effects. Powerful, flexible, open-source software tools have now been made available for use in large-scale, parallel computations to model the interaction of light with practically any kind of material in any arbitrary geometry. These recent developments in computational capability make possible the investigation of various emergent structures, materials, and physical phenomena that were previously beyond the reach of theoretical methods and even commercial software tools which tend to be less versatile and even less readily available to academic researchers and small groups. Computational electromagnetics may be broadly divided into two categories: differential-equation and integral-equation solvers. This seminar will cover both. We will first demonstrate how advances in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods via the open-source package MEEP can lead to new designs for light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells as well as light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Then we will discuss two applications of surface-integral-equation algorithms via the open-source package SCUFF-EM. These include designing antennas defined by periodic and aperiodic nanopatterning with polarization-sensitive frequency response, and optimizing the shapes and material content of asymmetric nanoparticles to maximize radiative heat transfer, Casimir forces, and other phenomena induced by thermal and quantum-mechanical fluctuations. Finally, we will describe efforts by our startup, Simpetus, to leverage on-demand, scalable, high-performance computing (HPC) in the public cloud for large-scale device design.

Speaker Bios

Ardavan Oskooi is the Founder and CEO of Simpetus, a San Francisco-based startup accelerating innovation and discovery in electromagnetics with simulations. Simpetus is a reference to our vision for simulations being an impetus for new discoveries and technologies. Ardavan received his Sc.D. from MIT where he worked with Professors Steven G. Johnson and John D. Joannopoulos to develop MEEP (thesis: Computation & Design for Nanophotonics). Ardavan has published 13 first-author articles in peer-reviewed journals, 3 issued patents, and the book Advances in FDTD Computational Electrodynamics: Photonics and Nanotechnology. Ardavan has a masters in Computation for Design and Optimization from MIT and completed his undergraduate studies, with honors, in Engineering Science at the University of Toronto. Prior to launching Simpetus, Ardavan worked as a postdoctoral researcher with Professors Susumu Noda at Kyoto University and Stephen R. Forrest at the University of Michigan on leveraging MEEP to push the frontier of optoelectronic device design.  M.T. Homer Reid is Lecturer in Applied Mathematics at MIT, where his research encompasses computational electromagnetics as well as computational quantum field theory and chemistry. Homer completed his PhD in physics at MIT, where he worked with Professors Jacob White and Steven G. Johnson to create the fluctuating-surface-current approach to fluctuational electrodynamics. Homer is the developer of the SCUFF-EM package for surface-integral modeling of deterministic and fluctuational electromagnetism problems. Before completing his PhD in theoretical physics, Homer worked as an experimental condensed-matter physicist and as an analog/RF integrated-circuit designer at a semiconductor company. [post_title] => Special Seminar: Leveraging Advances in Computational Electrodynamics to Enable New Kinds of Nanophotonic Devices [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => special-seminar-leveraging-advances-in-computational-electrodynamics-to-enable-new-kinds-of-nanophotonic-devices [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-03 16:31:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-03 23:31:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11163 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11135 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-31 15:22:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-31 22:22:34 [post_content] =>

You're Invited!

Please join the UW Department of Electrical Engineering on November 2nd for our third annual Bay Area Alumni Reception. Because the previous years' events were met with resounding success, the department is pleased to host another reception for our alums in the Bay Area. To view photos from last year's event, please look at our online album here. Hors d'oeuvres and refreshments (beer, wine and non-alcoholic beverages) will be provided. Contact: events@ee.washington.edu

When & Where

RSVP

Please RSVP for the event by October 23, 2017. RSVP here.

Faculty in Attendance

Radha Poovendran

Radha Poovendran

  • Professsor and Chair
  • Security, biosystems and machine learning.
Matt Reynolds

Matt Reynolds

  • Associate Professor; Associate Chair for Research and Entrepreneurship
  • RFID, ultra-low power sensing and computation, energy harvesting, wireless power transfer (WPT) and smart materials, surfaces and spaces.
Payman Arabshahi

Payman Arabshahi

  • Associate Professor; UW EE Director of Advancement
  • Underwater and space communications, wireless networks, power system optimization, smart grid, data mining and search, and signal processing.
Blake Hannaford

Blake Hannaford

  • Professsor
  • Control theory, biorobotics, telerobotic surgery, functional electrical stimulation, neural system control and haptic rendering.
Chris Rudell

Chris Rudell

  • Associate Professsor
  • RF, mm-Wave, Analog and Mixed-Signal Systems applied to biomedical devices including neural interfaces, communication systems, and imaging technology.
Joshua Smith

Josh Smith

  • Professsor
  • Sensor systems, wireless power, RF and other power harvesting, sensing for robotics and ubiquitous computing.

John Sahr

  • Professsor; Associate Chair for Education and Entrepreneurship
  • Ionospheric physics; electrojet turbulence; passive bistatic radar; radar remote sensing; radar waveform design; radar interferometry; and statistical signal processing.

Parking

There will complimentary parking for all guests. [post_title] => 2017 Bay Area Alumni Reception [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 2017-bay-area-reception [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-18 11:29:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-18 18:29:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11135 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11128 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-07-31 14:04:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-31 21:04:38 [post_content] => Are you an engineering, math or physical sciences student interested in graduate school in electrical engineering? Join us to learn more about our programs for MSEE (daytime) and Ph.D. degrees. Current UW EE graduate students and an academic adviser will be available to answer questions! Topics
  • Preparation and admissions
  • Master’s vs. Ph.D. programs
  • Degree requirements
  • Research groups and more!
Questions? Contact: grad@ee.washington.edu

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

  • 5:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303
[post_title] => Graduate Programs Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-programs-information-session-august-2-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-31 14:04:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-31 21:04:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11128 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10669 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-05-19 09:25:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-19 16:25:13 [post_content] => Join Dr. Uday Desai to hear about opportunities with India Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (IITH)! Time: 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. Where: EEB 045 IIT Hyderabad is looking for young dynamic faculty with a strong research record. This meeting is to give a perspective on IIT Hyderabad and also have a dialog with Ph.D. students who have an interest in a faculty position at IIT Hyderabad. IIT Hyderabad started in June 2008 and today it has 14 departments, 175 full time faculty, 2127 students of which 668 are Ph.D. students, 500 Masters students and rest undergraduate students. In a short time IITH has made its mark in research and teaching; IITH has sanction research funding of US dollars 45 million. On the academic front IITH has started a very novel program, referred to as Fractal Academics. IITH has a unique and strong collaboration with Japan. Besides, over 120 research and teaching labs, IITH has 3 incubators to promote entrepreneurship: iTIC -- IIT Hyderabad Technology Incubator, Center for Healthcare Entrepreneurship and Fabless Chip Design Incubator. [post_title] => Dr. Uday Desai IITH Opportunity Info Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-uday-desai-iith-opportunity-info-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-19 13:39:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-19 20:39:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10669 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [15] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10633 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-05-11 16:27:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:27:58 [post_content] => Are you an engineering, math or physical sciences student interested in graduate school in electrical engineering? Join us to learn more about our programs for MSEE (daytime) and Ph.D. degrees. Current UW EE graduate students and an academic adviser will be available to answer questions! Topics
  • Preparation and admissions
  • Master’s vs. Ph.D. programs
  • Degree requirements
  • Research groups and more!
Questions? Contact: grad@ee.washington.edu

Thursday, May 18, 2017

  • 5:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303
[post_title] => Graduate Programs Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-programs-information-session-may-18-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:27:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:27:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10633 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10399 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:52 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-dec-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:16:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:16:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10399 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10398 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:12 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-nov-9-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:17:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:17:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10398 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10397 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:50:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:50:25 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-oct-12-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:17:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:17:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10397 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10396 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:49:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:49:39 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-sept-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:17:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:17:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10396 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10395 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:48:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:48:48 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-aug-10-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:18:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:18:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10395 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10394 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:47:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:47:49 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, July 13, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-july-13-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:18:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:18:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10394 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10393 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:47:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:47:01 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, June 8, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-june-8-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:19:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:19:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10393 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10392 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 15:55:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 22:55:09 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, May 11, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-may-11-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:19:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:19:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10392 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [24] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10357 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-04-12 16:01:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-12 23:01:09 [post_content] =>

capstone-fair-website-header_v3

UW EE capstones are the culmination of a student’s electrical engineering education.  On Tuesday, May 30, we are proud to present our inaugural Capstone Fair, where students will present their projects to peers, industry professionals and faculty.

2017 Details

When

  • Tuesday, May 30
  • 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Where

  • HUB South Ballroom

Project Examples

capstone-project-examples

Companies Sponsoring the Entrepreneurial Capstones

Some of the students presenting their work during the fair are part of ENGINE -- our Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone program.  ENGINE projects are collaborative efforts made possible thanks to generous sponsorship from company partners.  Our 2017 sponsoring companies include: Blue Origin, Booz Allen Hamilton, dToor, Echodyne, Fluke, Fizikl, Millenium Space Systems, Nvidia, Plugable Technologies, Seattle Department of Transportation, Seattle Mountain Rescue, Tupl, UW Medicine, Voicebox and Wally Labs.

Parking and Map

For Industry Partners

Please refer to these parking instructions.

Campus Map

  • Please refer to the campus map and search for the Husky Union Building (HUB).
  • There will be signs in the HUB, leading to the event.
  [post_title] => 2017 UW EE Capstone Fair [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ee-capstone-fair-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-30 08:44:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-30 15:44:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10357 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10313 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-07 16:12:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-07 23:12:34 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Programmable Photonic Communication Systems"

Photonics is increasingly more attractive as a technology platform for addressing technological barriers facing bedrock high technology areas including next generation microprocessors and computing platforms, high speed communication systems, wireless networks and smart cities. Integrated photonics, coupled with decades of technological maturation, is enabling more complex, multi-component photonic systems that are essential in these applications. Software control together with photonic integration in particular form a vehicle for these photonic systems to scale and find widespread application. The resultant combination of basic physical phenomena, complex material and device architectures, application requirements and software control is opening up new interdisciplinary research problems. In this talk, I will review recent technological trends around integrated photonics and data communications and computing. Fiber optical communication systems, in particular, are at the leading edge of these trends. I will describe a long standing problem facing optically switched communication networks, which is the bottleneck created by peering requirements at Internet exchange points (IXP). Software defined networking (SDN) and integrated photonic devices are used to provide an optical layer peering mechanism with service level agreement (SLA) enforcement. Using 100 Gb/s polarization multiplexed quadrature phase shift keyed (PM-QPSK) optical signals, high capacity can be delivered with low latency across multiple network domains, a critical requirement expected for 5G mobile and data center interconnection (DCI) networks.

Speaker

Dan Kilper

Daniel Kilper (University of Arizona)

Daniel Kilper is a research professor in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He holds a joint appointment in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Arizona and an adjunct faculty position in electrical engineering at Columbia University. He received a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Michigan in 1996. From 2000-2013 he was a member of technical staff at Bell Labs. Within both academia and industry, he has made contributions in the area of communication devices and networks primarily spanning three areas: energy efficient communication networks, optical performance monitoring and dynamic optical networks. He is a senior member of IEEE and is an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Green Communications and Networking and a steering committee member for the IEEE Green ICT Initiative. He currently serves as administrative director for the Center for Integrated Access Networks, an NSF Engineering Research Center and has served in leadership positions in multi-university/industry consortia including the Center for Telecommunications Value Chain Research (CTVR), Center for Energy Efficient Telecommunications (CEET) and the GreenTouch Consortium. His work has been recognized with the Bell Labs President's Gold Medal Award and he served on the Bell Labs President’s Advisory Council on Research. He holds seven patents and authored four book chapters and more than one hundred thirty peer-reviewed publications.

  [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Dan Kilper [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-dan-kilper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-11 14:07:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-11 21:07:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10313 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [26] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10230 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-03-28 11:56:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-28 18:56:57 [post_content] => Casino Night 2017 Casino Night 2017 is here!  This popular event, hosted by the student-run IEEE/HKN society, is for electrical engineering and computer science students and industry representatives only.  With both casual gaming and designated time for recruitment, the evening is a fun, relaxed environment where professionals in the field can talk personally with students about their goals and interests.  More than 80 students had the opportunity to mingle and chat with eight companies at Casino Night 2016. Light food and beverages are provided. And UW EE faculty serve as the dealers!

When & Where

For Industry

Chat with up-and-coming electrical and computer science engineers in a relaxed, fun environment!
  • Register via Eventbrite (Password: UWIEEEHKN)
  • Deadline:  April 10, 2017
  • Cost:  $100 for Casino Night 2017 / $250 for Casino Night 2017 + 1 tech talk in autumn quarter 2017
  • Questions:  Contact the IEEE/HKN officers.

For Students

Come network with company representatives from Microsoft, ESI and more over casino games and dinner!  Dress is business casual.  Resumes are strongly recommended -- you can either upload yours in advance via the Catalyst drop box or bring print copies with you.
  • Register via Eventbrite
  • Cost: Free for IEEE members; $5 for non-members.
  • Deadline:  Students can continue to register throughout the event.
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When

  • Thursday, May 4, 2017
  • 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Where

  • Amazon Campus Van Vorst Library 426 Terry Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98109

Getting There

Please refer to this map for the event location. For event parking, there is plenty of street parking after 6:00 p.m. There is also a public paid parking garage off of Harrison St., between Terry Ave. N. and Boren Ave. Another paid parking garage is off of Harrison St., between Westlake Ave. N. and Terry Ave. N.

Building Access

Upon arrival, attendees will need to check in at the front desk. Amazon security will provide a badge for each person and offer directions to the event.

RSVP

We're so sorry, but we've reached capacity for this event and closed registration.  To keep abreast of upcoming opportunities to connect with UW EE, please visit our Alumni page.  Hope to see you at our next Puget Sound area event!

About the Event

For the second year in a row, we are fortunate to have Vice-President of Amazon and UW EE Affiliate Professor Babak Parviz host the Department of Electrical Engineering alumni mixer at Amazon’s campus. The evening is an opportunity for guests to network with each other and meet current UW EE leadership and faculty while hearing about today’s research. Due to the overwhelming response last year, please note space is limited and registration will close when capacity has been reached. We encourage you to RSVP early. Hosts: 
rp-headhsot

Radha Poovendran Professor and Chair

Research areas: Security, biosystems and machine learning
bp-headshot

Babak Parviz VP at Amazon and Affiliate Professor

Research areas:
High-tech with social impact

Featured Faculty Members: 
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Payman Arabshahi Associate Professor

Research areas: Underwater and space communications
la-headhsot

Les Atlas Professor

Research areas:
Signal processing for dynamical systems

bd-headshot

Bruce Darling Professor

Research areas: Integrated sensor development
Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff

Lillian Ratliff Assistant Professor

Research areas:
Next-generation urban infrastructure systems

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Matt Reynolds Associate Professor

Research areas:
Smart materials, RFID and WPT

Sahr_John__1457645790_128.95.215.177

John Sahr
Professor

Research areas: Ionospheric physics and radar remote sensing
ms-headshot

Mani Soma Professor

Research areas: Mixed-signal, RF, high-frequency ICs
bz-headshot

Baosen Zhang Assistant Professor

Research areas:
Smart cities and power systems

[post_title] => The 2017 Puget Sound Alumni Mixer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-puget-sound-alumni-mixer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-02 16:10:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-02 23:10:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10088 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [28] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9893 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-02-16 16:52:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-17 00:52:54 [post_content] =>

When

Saturday, April 22 9-10:30 a.m.

Where

EE Building — Upper Basement Benton Lane Seattle WA 98195 (For directions, download this PDF.) [caption id="attachment_10483" align="aligncenter" width="625"]entrance for Discovery Days Alumni Breakfast Look for the exterior entrance as pictured on the left, then choose the doors that lead you to the UW EE administrative offices. From there, follow the signs to join us for breakfast![/caption]

RSVP

We're so sorry -- we have reached capacity and closed registration for this event.  We invite you to still visit campus to enjoy Discovery Days exhibits, and we hope you can join us for breakfast next year!

About the Event

The UW College of Engineering's Discovery Days (April 21-22) is a great opportunity for students and families from all over the Puget Sound region to join for hands-on activities (like discovering the mechanics behind making a pickle glow and a robot shake hands). The Department of Electrical Engineering will hold an exclusive breakfast for our alumni and their children or grandchildren for a sneak preview of the Discovery Days exhibits before they are open to the general public. It’s a tradition we started last year with great response from the EE community. We look forward to meeting your family at the breakfast. View a selection of photos from last year's Discovery Days: 2016 Discovery Days

Parking on Campus

Upon Arrival to Campus

  • Stop at a campus gatehouse and advise the Parking Specialist that you are attending the “EE Alumni Breakfast” in the Electrical Engineering Department.
  • A parking permit, with the closest available parking lot, will be printed and given to you to display on your vehicle's dashboard as instructed.
  • If you need disability accommodations, please advise the Parking Specialist.

 Estimated Saturday Morning Parking Rates

  • Surface Parking Lots: $5, arrival prior to 12 p.m. (noon) on Saturday.
  • Central Plaza Garage: $10, arrival prior to 12 p.m. (noon) on Saturday.
Note: If your visit is less than one hour, be sure to stop at a campus gatehouse as you exit for a prorated refund.  Please contact the Transportation Services, Events Office at 206.616.8710 or via email at tsevents@uw.edu if you have any questions or need further assistance with your parking arrangement at the University of Washington, Seattle Campus. [post_title] => The 2017 Discovery Days: Alumni Breakfast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-discovery-days-alumni-breakfast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 13:06:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 20:06:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9893 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [29] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9831 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-02-02 14:19:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-02 22:19:32 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Building Secure-Aware Cyber-Physical Systems: A Satisfiability Modulo Convex Optimization Approach"

The rapidly increasing dependence on cyber-physical systems (CPS) in building critical infrastructures — in the context of smart cities, power grids, medical devices and self-driving cars — has opened the gates to increasingly sophisticated and harmful attacks with financial, societal, criminal or political effects. While a traditional cyber-attack may leak credit-card or other personal sensitive information, a CPS-attack can lead to a loss of control in nuclear reactors, gas turbines, the power grid, transportation networks and other critical infrastructure, placing the nation’s security, economy and public safety at risk. I will start this talk by motivating for the differences between CPS-security and cyber-security. To this end, I will show experimental results on non-invasive sensor spoofing attacks targeting the anti-lock brake systems (ABS) in automobiles. As the need for CPS-security becomes evident,  I will focus on a problem known as "secure state estimation.” It aims to estimate the state of a dynamical system when an adversary arbitrarily corrupts a subset of its sensors.  Although of critical importance, this problem is NP-hard and combinatorial in nature since the subset of attacked sensors is unknown. I will show that the "secure state estimation" is a special case of a larger class of logic formulas, termed satisfiability modulo convex (SMC) formulas. I will present then a new satisfiability modulo convex procedure that uses a lazy combination of Boolean satisfiability solving and convex programming to provide a satisfying assignment or determine that the formula is unsatisfiable. I will finish by showing, through multiple experimental and simulation results that SMC solvers outperform other techniques when used to solve the secure state estimation problem.

Speaker

Yasser Shoukry

Yasser Shoukry (UC Berkeley)

Yasser Shoukry is a postdoctoral scholar at the EECS Department at UC Berkeley, the EE Department at UCLA and the ESE Department at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from UCLA in 2015 where he was affiliated with both the Cyber-Physical Systems Lab as well as the Networked and Embedded Systems Lab. Before joining UCLA, he spent four years as an R&D engineer in the industry of automotive embedded systems. His research interests include the design and implementation of secure- and privacy-aware cyber-physical systems and Internet of Things (IoT) by drawing on tools from control theory, optimization theory, embedded systems and formal methods. Shoukry is the recipient of the Best Paper Award from the International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS) in 2016. He is also the recipient of the UCLA EE Distinguished Ph.D. Dissertation Award in 2016, the UCLA Chancellors prize in 2011 and 2012, UCLA EE Graduate Division Fellowship in 2011 and 2012 and the UCLA EE Preliminary Exam Fellowship in 2012. In 2015, Shoukry led the UCLA/Caltech/CMU team to win the first place in the NSF Early Career Investigators (NSF-ECI) research challenge. His team represented the NSF-ECI in the NIST Global Cities Technology Challenge, an initiative designed to advance the deployment of IoT technologies within a smart city. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Yasser Shoukry [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-yasser-shoukry [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-08 16:32:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 00:32:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9831 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [30] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9800 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-31 13:08:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:08:07 [post_content] =>

Monday, Feb. 27, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => BSMS Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bsms-program-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 13:08:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:08:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9800 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [31] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9798 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-31 13:00:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:00:09 [post_content] =>

Are you an engineering, math or physical sciences student interested in graduate school in electrical engineering? Please join us to learn more about the daytime MSEE and Ph.D. programs in electrical engineering. Current UW EE graduate students and advisers will be available to answer questions!

Topics

  • Preparation and admissions
  • Master’s vs. Ph.D. programs
  • Degree requirements
  • Research groups
  • And more!

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017

  • 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
  [post_title] => Graduate Programs Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-programs-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 13:01:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:01:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9798 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [32] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9783 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-26 16:07:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-27 00:07:08 [post_content] =>

On-campus information sessions give prospective students an opportunity for one-on-one conversation with the Professional Programs Advising Office and faculty. Sessions provide a comprehensive overview of the Electrical Engineering Professional Master’s Program, including admissions requirements, deadlines, PMP curriculum and the PMP community. We invite you to attend!

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Stay Updated

Join the PMP mailing list to stay up to date on upcoming information sessions, application deadlines and other program activities. [post_title] => Professional Master's Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professional-masters-program-information-session-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 12:56:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 20:56:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9783 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [33] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9781 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-26 16:05:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-27 00:05:33 [post_content] =>

On-campus information sessions give prospective students an opportunity for one-on-one conversation with the Professional Programs Advising Office and faculty. Sessions provide a comprehensive overview of the Electrical Engineering Professional Master’s Program, including admissions requirements, deadlines, PMP curriculum and the PMP community. We invite you to attend!

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017

Stay Updated

Join the PMP mailing list to stay up to date on upcoming information sessions, application deadlines and other program activities. [post_title] => Professional Master's Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professional-masters-program-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 12:56:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 20:56:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9781 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [34] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9677 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-23 10:52:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-23 18:52:23 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Next-Generation Computing using Spin-Based and 2D Materials"

We are at a time where the electronics industry is feeling pressure from two sides: on the small scale we are facing the fundamental physical limits of silicon, and on the large scale we are facing new big-data applications, such as for the internet of things. The future of computing will require both more energy-efficient electronics and more big-data-driven, application-specific designs. Magnetic devices are a promising candidate for future electronics, due to their low voltage operation, nonvolatility and low thermal budget, which can open up new energy-efficient, normally-off, memory-in-computing, 3D monolithic architectures. Magnetic materials are one of the few materials systems that can be more energy efficient than silicon transistors for memory and logic, and have been shown to be more energy efficient and faster than other emerging resistive memories. Additionally, the emerging class of 2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have little to no surface roughness with monolayer thickness, and thus 2D transistors can be scaled without sacrificing mobility. They have the benefits of flexibility and low thermal budget, and new physics we can utilize such as the valley Hall effect. Thus, spin-based and 2D materials are very important classes of materials to explore for beyond-CMOS devices and systems. I will present experimental results using three-terminal spin switches to build practical magnetic logic devices and circuits and show they satisfy the requirements for beyond-CMOS devices. We show a single device can act as an inverter, and we are able to propagate bits between the spin switches to build up circuits. I will also show our work on voltage control of the spin and valley Hall effect in TMD materials, which could be used for future 2D-magnetic hybrid devices. I will discuss the future directions of this work, including building energy-efficient 3D monolithic systems of these emerging technologies, and looking further to quantum computing.

Speaker

Jean Anne Incorvia

Jean Anne Incorvia (Stanford University)

Jean Anne C. Incorvia is a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford University in electrical engineering and a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley electrical engineering and computer science. She received her Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University in 2015, cross-registered at MIT, where she was a Department of Energy Graduate Student Fellow. She received her bachelor’s in physics from UC Berkeley in 2008. Her research focuses on emerging materials and devices for nanoelectronics. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Jean Anne Incorvia [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-jean-anne-incorvia [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-23 10:53:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-23 18:53:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9677 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [35] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9648 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-13 15:43:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-13 23:43:53 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Connectivity Meets Computing: A Wireless Networking Perspective"

Networks of tomorrow are more about “user quality of experience” than they are about “network quality of service.” Wireless mobile networks, being an integral part of such a vision, will need to evolve from their current generation (4G LTE) to a more radical one (5G) to cater to such expectations. While connectivity will continue being a key enabler in such a transformation, one cannot ignore the confluence of connectivity and computing that is pervading the mobile ecosystem, both on the user side (e.g. smart phones, wearables) as well as on the network side (e.g. software-defined mobile networks). This talk will draw from some of my works that aim to push the envelope in connectivity as well as its confluence with computing from the perspective of wireless networks. In the space of connectivity, I will motivate the need for a radically new wireless access paradigm called “Access Asynchronously, Transmit Synchronously” (A2TS) to meet the demands of future 5G networks. A2TS brings together the best of two highly disparate wireless technologies — asynchronous Wi-Fi that enables scalable, coexistence-friendly deployments and synchronous LTE that delivers superior performance through advanced wireless techniques. I will discuss how to design the A2TS access paradigm from first principles, and then illustrate its real-world potential by building a scalable, network MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output) system using 802.11ac access points. In leveraging the synergy between connectivity and computing, I will highlight the growing importance of clouddriven radio access networks (C-RANs), especially for dense deployments (e.g. event centers, stadiums, urban hot-spots); then introduce the notion of a “software-defined front-haul” (SDF) network that we developed for C-RANs. I will show why SDFs are the key to unlocking the true potential of SDN in wireless access and how they can be dynamically orchestrated to not only optimize individual user and traffic performance, but also contribute to green (energy-efficient) computing in the network. I will conclude by sharing some thoughts on how mobile connectivity and computing need to evolve to support the heterogeneous demands and diversity of future mobile services that range from massive scale IoT to mobile augmented/virtual reality.

Speaker

Karthik Sundaresan

Karthik Sundaresan (NEC Labs America)

Karthikeyan Sundaresan is a senior researcher in the mobile communications and networking research department at NEC Labs America. He received his MS and Ph.D. From the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech. His research interests are broadly in wireless networking and mobile computing, and span both algorithm design as well as system prototyping. He is the recipient of several best paper awards at prestigious ACM and IEEE conferences (MobiHoc, CoNEXT, ICNP, SECON), and is the recipient of ACM Sigmobile’s Rockstar award (2016) for early career contributions to the field of mobile computing. He holds over twenty patents and received a business contribution award from NEC for the technology commercialization of a wireless interference management solution for LTE small-cells. He is a senior member of IEEE and currently serves as an associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Karthik Sundaresan [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-karthik-sundaresan [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-13 15:45:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-13 23:45:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9648 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [36] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8778 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 13:16:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 21:16:15 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 9, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Speakers

Grad Showcase

UW EE is proud to present our second annual Graduate Research Showcase Please join us to as eight graduate students present their research in rapid-fire five-minute talks. The topics span a range of areas and show the breadth of research in the department!
[caption id="attachment_10496" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Sandamali Devadithya Sandamali Devadithya: “Accelerated millimeter wave image reconstruction”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10497" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Taylor Fryett Taylor Fryett: “Patterning enabled quasi-phase matching in 2D material clad optical micro-resonators”[/caption]
[caption id="attachment_10498" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Miles Gander Miles Gander: “Digital logic circuits in yeast with CRISPR-dCas9 NOR gates”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10499" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Ethan Keeler Ethan Keeler: “MEMS Resonant Mass Sensor with Enabled Optical Trapping”[/caption]
[caption id="attachment_10500" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Jimin Kim Jimin Kim: “Neural Interactome: Interactive Visualization of a Neuronal System”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10595" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Farah Nadeem Farah, Nadeem: “Convolutional Neural Network Based Text Classification for Educational Applications”[/caption]
[caption id="attachment_10501" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Apoorva Sharma Apoorva Sharma: “Dual Band HF/UHF Implant and External Antennas for Wireless Power and Backscatter Communication in Biomedical Devices”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10502" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Astrini Sie Astrini Sie: “Soft tissue classification and diagnostic using a smart surgical grasper for robotic surgery”[/caption]
[post_title] => Research Colloquium: Grad Showcase [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-grad-showcase [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-04 11:26:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-04 18:26:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8778 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [37] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8777 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:24:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:24:27 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 23, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Overcoming diffraction and multiple-scattering limitations in optical imaging"

Optical computational imaging seeks enhanced performance and new functionality by the joint design of illumination, optics, detectors and reconstruction algorithms. Two remarkable examples discussed here enable overcoming the diffraction limit and imaging through complex media. Abbe’s resolution limit has been overcome after more than 130 years enabling unprecedented opportunities for optical imaging at the nanoscale. Fluorescence imaging using photoactivatable or photoswitchable molecules within computational optical systems offers single molecule sensitivity within a wide field of view. The advent of three-dimensional point spread function engineering associated with optimal reconstruction algorithms provides a unique approach to further increase resolution in three dimensions. Focusing and imaging through strongly scattering media has also been accomplished recently in the optical regime.  By using a feedback system and optical modulation, the resulting wavefronts overcome the effects of multiple scattering upon propagation through the medium. In particular, a phase-control holographic technique helps characterize scattering media at high-speed using micro-electro-mechanical technology, allowing focusing through a temporally dynamic, strongly scattering sample. Further, our recent investigations demonstrate the possibility of non-invasively imaging objects through a scattering medium using the photoacoustic effect while keeping the optical resolution.

Speaker

Rafael Piestun

Rafael Piestun (University of Colorado)

Rafael Piestun received MSc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. From 1998 to 2000 he was a researcher at Stanford University. Since 2001 he has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Physics at the University of Colorado – Boulder. Professor Piestun is a fellow of the Optical Society of America, was a Fulbright scholar, an Eshkol fellow, received a Honda Initiation Grant award, a Minerva award, a Provost Achievement Award and El-Op and Gutwirth prizes. He served in the editorial committee of Optics and Photonics News and was associate editor for Applied Optics. He was the director and principal investigator of the NSF-IGERT program in Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging at the University of Colorado and is co-principal investigator of the STROBE NSF Science and Technology Center. His areas of interest include computational optical imaging, superresolution microscopy, volumetric photonic devices, scattering optics and ultrafast optics. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Rafael Piestun [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-rafael-piestun [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-12 12:18:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-12 19:18:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8777 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [38] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8776 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:22:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:22:23 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 18, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Silicon-based Integrated Sensors and Systems with On-chip Antennas: From Picosecond Pulse Radiators to Miniaturized Spectrometers"

Today's silicon process technology makes it possible to integrate everything from antennas to processors on a single chip at almost no cost. This creates new opportunities for implementing complex sensors and systems on a millimeter scale. To create such devices, an understanding of physics, waves, electromagnetics and high-frequency electronics is essential. In this presentation, I will show how the convergence of these fields has resulted in single-chip picosecond pulse radiators, wirelessly synchronized chips with sub-psec synchronization accuracy, miniaturized spectrometers and wirelessly powered sensors and actuators. In the first section of the talk, I will present techniques for generating and detecting picosecond pulses, based on a novel laser-free Digital-to-Impulse (D2I) radiation. This technology can produce broadband pulses with a record width of 1.9psec that cover a frequency spectrum from 30GHz to 1.1THz and that have a resolution of 2Hz at 1THz. I will discuss how this technology enables us to perform broadband THz spectroscopy, hyper-spectral 3D imaging and Tbits/sec wireless communication. In the second part, I will present my work on precision time transfer and wireless synchronization of widely spaced chips. This technique eliminates the wires between the elements of a distributed array and makes it possible to build a highly flexible large aperture. In this section, I will also present my work on optical locking of microwave oscillators, which achieves a picosecond timing accuracy over a 1.5m distance. In the third section of the talk, I will focus on miniaturized spectrometers and sensors. I will discuss an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometer that is based on a single-chip full-duplex transceiver for detecting paramagnetic chemicals and free radicals. The EPR sensor technology developed in my laboratory has been successfully deployed in major oil and gas fields in the United States and Canada. This technology is used to monitor the concentration of asphaltenes (a chemical that clogs oil wells) in real-time and to minimize the use of environmentally hazardous chemical inhibitors in energy production. I will further present my recent work on wirelessly powered microchips with on-chip antennas. These microchips are designed to perform sensing, actuation and localization. I will provide examples of such microchips being used to pace the heart of a sheep and to trigger the leg movement of a rat. Finally, I will discuss the future directions of my research on building wirelessly powered single-chip electronic drugs for medical applications and electronic tracers for energy exploration as well as for industrial monitoring.

Speaker

Aydin Babakhani

Aydin Babakhani (Rice University)

Aydin Babakhani is a Louis Owen Junior Chair Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rice University and the director of Rice Integrated Systems and Circuits Laboratory. He received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology in 2003 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Caltech in 2005 and 2008, respectively. He was a postdoctoral scholar at Caltech in 2009 and a research scientist at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 2010. Babakhani has been awarded multiple best paper awards, including the Best Paper Award at the IEEE SiRF conference in 2016, the Best Paper Award at the IEEE RWS Symposium in 2015, the Best Paper Award at the IEEE IMS Symposium in 2014 and 2nd place in the Best Paper Awards at the IEEE APS Symposium 2016 and IEEE IMS Symposium 2016. He has published more than 85 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings and has 21 issued or pending patents. His research is supported by NSF, DARPA, AFOSR, ONR, the W. M. Keck Foundation, SRC and more than 10 companies. He received a prestigious NSF CAREER award in 2015, an Innovation Award from Northrop Grumman in 2014 and a DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2012. He also received the Caltech Electrical Engineering Department's Charles Wilts Best PhD Thesis Prize for his work titled “Near-Field Direct Antenna Modulation.” He was the recipient of the Microwave Graduate Fellowship in 2007, the Grand Prize in the Stanford–Berkeley–Caltech Innovators Challenge in 2006, the Analog Devices Inc. Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2005, as well as a Caltech Special Institute Fellowship and an Atwood Fellowship in 2003. He was also the Gold Medal winner at both the National Physics Competition in 1998 and the 30th International Physics Olympiad in Padova, Italy, in 1999. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Aydin Babakhani [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-aydin-babakhani [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-07 09:28:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-07 16:28:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8776 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [39] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8775 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:20:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:20:54 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 4, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Natural User Interface (NUI) has finally arrived!"

On March 2, 1992, Casper was introduced by Dr. Kai-Fu Lee at Apple on Good Morning America as the first speaker-independent continuous speech recognizer which could interact with human. Apple was too far ahead of time. The technology was not quite there. In 2004, Dr. Lee tried it again at Microsoft, advocating "NUI" (pronounced as /n uw iy/) or Natural User Interface and it was shut down once more. It wasn’t until 2010, after iPhone took over the world, that a personal assistant like Siri shed its light. The advancement and ubiquitous appearance of mobile devices renders NUI a great deal of sense, as typing on small devices is painful. The breakthrough deep neural network (DNN) in 2012 brought speech and image recognition accuracy to a new territory and rallied both research and industry. From then on, artificial intelligence (AI) is finally awake and large. Established companies and startups alike are placing their bets, hoping to be at the forefront of this evolution. Mobvoi, as an established startup, is one of these firms which are determined to play an important role in this historical evolution. I will talk about what our company does and what our vision is, and present some technical work we’ve built along the way.

Speaker

Mei-Yuh HwangMei-Yuh Hwang (Mobvoi)

Mei-Yuh Hwang obtained her Ph.D. in computer science in 1993 from Carnegie Mellon University. She learned the core of speech recognition from Dr. Kai-Fu Lee and Raj Reddy. After graduation, she worked at Microsoft Research, later Microsoft speech products, Bing Translation and Chinese Cortana, while serving as a researcher at University of Washington in 2004-2008. Her publications include speech recognition, machine translation and language understanding in the major conferences, IEEE journals, and U.S. patents. She joined Mobvoi in 2016 and is leading its R&D division in Redmond, Washington. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Mei-Yuh Hwang [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-mei-yuh-hwang [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-27 16:17:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-27 23:17:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8775 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [40] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8774 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:19:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:19:25 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, March 28, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

The wireless industry has put out a vision of 5G enabling extreme mobile broadband with peak data rates of more than 10Gbps, ultra-low latency with end-to-end latencies of less than 1ms and ultra-reliability to support mission critical applications. Current cellular networks that have been designed for human interactions and latencies of 100ms will transform into networks designed for real-time machine-to-machine interactions. In this talk, I will introduce 5G, discuss applications enabled by 5G, where to find spectrum for 5G and present some recent results in indoor environments.

Speaker

Klaus Doppler (Nokia)

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Klaus Doppler joined Nokia in 2002. He has contributed to Nokia’s 4G, 5G and Wi-Fi research in multiple roles. Currently, he is heading the Connectivity Lab in Nokia Bell Labs and his research focus is on indoor networks. In the past, he has been responsible for the wireless research and standardization (4G, 5G, Wi-Fi) in Nokia Technologies, incubated a new business line, contributed to Nokia’s radio technology vision and has led various research projects. He has pioneered research on Device-to-Device Communications underlaying LTE networks. Klaus received his Ph.D. from Helsinki University of Technology, Finland in 2010 and his MSc. in Electrical Engineering from Graz University of Technology, Austria in 2003. He has more than 75 pending and granted patent applications, and he has published 30 journal and conference publications and book chapters and received several inventor awards at Nokia.

[post_title] => Research Colloquium: Klaus Doppler [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-klaus-doppler [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-16 14:19:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 21:19:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8774 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [41] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8722 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 16:01:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 00:01:54 [post_content] =>

When

  • Friday, April 21, 2017 / 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 22, 2017 / 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Where

EE Building Benton Lane Seattle WA 98195 (For directions, download this PDF.)

About the Event

The UW College of Engineering's Discovery Days (April 21-22) is a great opportunity for students and families from all over the Puget Sound region to join for hands-on activities (like discovering the mechanics behind making a pickle glow and a robot shake hands). View a selection of photos from last year's Discovery Days: 2016 Discovery Days   [post_title] => Engineering Discovery Days [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => engineering-discovery-days [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-15 16:31:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-15 23:31:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8722 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [42] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8718 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:36:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:36:47 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Harnessing Microwave Signals of Opportunity for Addressing the Water Puzzle"

Quantifying stores of fresh water is of ever-increasing importance because of the rapid increase in world population while the relatively small supplies of fresh water remain fixed at best. With evident changes in the global climate, water-related issues have been identified by the intelligence community as an important factor in the US world-wide threat assessment. The first order of business is to know where and how much water there is (and where there is not). Only then will it be possible to predict the future trends in water availability and to develop adaptation strategies. The principle of microwave remote sensing has long been established as a means to quantify water resources because of the strong dependence of electromagnetic scattering in the microwave regime to the presence of water. Much of the environmental sensing work in our group has been motivated and designed based on the above recognition.  But numerous technical challenges remain in developing an affordable and capable water observing system. This talk starts by a brief description of some of the critical problems in the remote sensing of water resources today, and discusses how our research addresses several components of these problems by developing new spaceborne and airborne radar sensor technologies, as well as in-situ sensor networks. A major focus of the talk will be on the opportunistic and shared use of the microwave spectrum for devising novel water sensing systems. The emerging research for mapping profiles of soil water content (‘soil moisture’), variations in permafrost properties in the arctic and boreal regions, and ground water in arid/semiarid environments are discussed.

Speaker

Mahta MoghaddamMahta Moghaddam (University of Southern California)

Mahta Moghaddam is professor of electrical engineering at the University of Southern California (USC) Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, as well as the vice dean for research of Viterbi School of Engineering for academic year 2016-2017. Until 2011, she was on the faculty at the University of Michigan. She received her Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana, in 1991. From 1991 to 2003, she was with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California. During the past ~25 years of active involvement in environmental remote sensing, Moghaddam has introduced new approaches for quantitative interpretation of synthetic aperture radar imagery. Her most recent contributions include the development of new radar measurement technologies for subsurface and subcanopy characterization, development of forward and inverse scattering techniques for layered random media with rough interfaces, developing sensor web technologies for in-situ environmental sensing and transforming concepts of radar remote sensing to high-resolution medical imaging and therapy. She is a member of the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission Science Team, member of the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Team and the PI for AirMOSS NASA Earth Ventures Suborbital 1 Mission. She is a Fellow of IEEE and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Mahta Moghaddam [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-mahta-moghaddam [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-08 16:31:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 00:31:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8718 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [43] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8717 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:35:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:35:38 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Recent Developments in Fiber and Wireless Broadband Access Communications"

The field of broadband communications has seen tremendous growth in the last several years, driven by over-the-top video streaming, cloud computing, upcoming internet of things and 5G wireless networks.  In this presentation, we start from the internet transformation driven by datacenter networks, followed by an introduction of the Google Fiber project, our achievements and the challenges faced by the Google Fiber project.  We will also review the latest development in wire-line and wireless broadband access networks and the enabling technologies.

Speaker

Cedric Lam

Cedric Lam 林 峯 (Engineering Director, Google Access)

Cedric F. Lam was a founder of Google Fiber.  He is currently engineering director at Google Access, responsible for the planning and development of scalable and cost-effective next generation access technologies to provide diverse and abundant bandwidths.  Prior to Google Fiber, he was working on transport and interconnect technologies for Google datacenters.  Before joining Google, Lam was chief system architect at Opvista which made ultra-high density WDM transport systems.  Prior to Opvista, Lam was senior technical staff member at AT&T Labs, Broadband Access Research Department.  Lam is a Fellow of OSA.   He has a Ph.D. from UCLA and B. Eng. (First Class Honors) from University of Hong Kong, both in electrical engineering.   [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Cedric Lam (林 峯) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-cedric-lam [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-11 16:15:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-12 00:15:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8717 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [44] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8716 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:34:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:34:27 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Research journey: Scaling-up thin film solar cells and on-chip magnetic inductors for dc-to-dc power conversion"

The global energy demand is predicted to reach 28 Terawatts by 2050. Solar energy can meet a sizeable fraction of this demand. The cost of solar energy has reached 3cents/KWh, making it competitive with traditional energy choices. To harvest this energy, we propose the fabrication of thin solar cells from thin films of direct bandgap semiconductors composed of CuInGaSe2 and of earth-abundant, environmentally friendly materials. Another promising material for low cost, thin film, solar cell absorber layers is the quaternary compound of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), the equivalent of CuInS2 with Sn and Zn replacing In that is scarce and expensive. Electrodeposition of nanoscale metallic films and annealing in a selenium/sulfur atmosphere is one of the most promising, low cost methods of synthesis. Solar thin film panels are scaled to m2. We demonstrated scalability of thin film solar cells using a CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) absorber on 30 cm x 60 cm and full panel size of 60cm x 120 cm. This work enabled a 1m2/min continuous industrial scale line with 14% solar conversion efficiency panels. Monolithically integrated dc-dc power converters are enabling technologies for fine-grain power management of high performance microprocessors. Power efficiency of 90% or more is needed for many mainstream applications where the power dissipation is 100W or higher. Integrated buck converters need to be operated in a frequency range of 50-250 MHz and a very high inductor Q≥17@100MHz is required for the magnetic inductor. We have achieved magnetic inductors with the highest Q ever reported that are suitable to be used in 90% efficient silicon power converters.

Speaker

Lili Deligianni (IBM Research)

Lili DeligianniLili Deligianni is a Principal investigator & Research Scientist at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. Deligianni’s recent research interests include biosensors and bioelectronics, on-chip magnetic inductors and thin film solar cells. These are game-changing technologies which can be used in bioelectronics and power electronics with applications in digital health, mobile phones and IoT, and electric cars. Deligianni played a leading role in the successful introduction of electrochemical processes in the solder bump technology. The process became the standard in the electronic industry for joining of silicon chips to packages. She also co-invented the copper electrodeposition process for on-chip interconnects. The introduction of electroplated copper wire on silicon wafers has revolutionized the capability of computer chips. For the patents associated with the copper interconnect process, she received the 2006 Inventor of the Year Award of the New York Intellectual Property Law Association and two IBM Corporate Awards. She has co-authored 52 peer-reviewed publications and more than 130 patents and patent applications.  Lili Deligianni received her Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign and has been with IBM ever since.  She is an elected member of the IBM Academy of Technology. Deligianni served on the Board of Directors, and is the past-Secretary of the ECS.  She is a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society and has been the recipient of the Electrochemical Society Electrodeposition Research Award. She is a senior member of IEEE and of AIChE.  She is a member of AAAS.  Deligianni is also the past chair of the Watson Women’s Network and leads Engineer’s Week outreach in K-12 schools. 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Device-to-Device Communications in LTE: Out-of-coverage device discovery [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => colloquium-device-to-device-communications-in-lte-out-of-coverage-device-discovery [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-16 16:16:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-16 23:16:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11623 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11616 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-10-16 10:14:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-16 17:14:13 [post_content] => [post_title] => WNF Ribbon Cutting & NNCI Appreciation Night [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => wnf-ribbon-cutting-nnci-appreciation-night [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-16 10:14:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-16 17:14:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11616 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11541 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-10-05 08:32:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-05 15:32:09 [post_content] => Capstone Pitch Day 2017 header   Industry Pitch Day is your opportunity to present a project to an audience of UW EE seniors in ENGINE — our entrepreneurial capstone program. Projects have covered an amazing spectrum from sensors to spaceflight to machine learning/AI and more!

When & Where

  • Wednesday, Oct. 25, 4:30–7 p.m.
  • Please check-in between 4:00 - 4:30 p.m.
  • Kane Hall 225 (Walker-Ames Room)

Register

We're looking forward to seeing your company's project at pitch day!  To confirm your attendance, please register in advance.  You're welcome to register up to six representatives.
  • Registration
  • Deadline:  Sunday, Oct. 22, 11:45 p.m. (Pacific Time)

Parking

Parking is complimentary for industry representatives. Please review the parking instructions here.

Contact

[post_title] => Industry Capstone Pitch Day [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => capstone-pitch-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-10 15:05:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-10 22:05:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11541 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11525 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-10-03 13:56:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-03 20:56:02 [post_content] => PC&E Open House: UW Grad ProgramsInterested in taking your electrical engineering career to the next level — or moving your career in the direction of electrical engineering? Our Professional Master’s Program (PMP) may be just what you need! Visit the UW Grad Programs for Professionals Open House to learn more about UW EE’s master’s program for working professional and to chat with our PMP adviser.

When & Where

RSVP

Please RSVP for the open house with Professional & Continuing Education. [post_title] => UW EE Professional Master's @ Open House: UW Grad Programs for Professionals [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => pce-open-house-autumn-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-03 13:58:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-03 20:58:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11525 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11469 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-25 17:16:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-26 00:16:07 [post_content] =>

When

Tuesday, October 10, 2017 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Where

EEB 105 Electrical Engineering Building

Speaker

Vladimir Stojanovic 

Biography

Vladimir Stojanovic is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include design, modeling and optimization of integrated systems, from CMOS-based VLSI blocks and interfaces to system design with emerging devices like NEM relays and silicon-photonics. He is also interested in design and implementation of energy-efficient electrical and optical networks, and digital communication techniques in high-speed interfaces and high-speed mixed-signal IC design.Prof. Stojanovic received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2005, and the Dipl. Ing. degree from the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1998. He was also with Rambus, Inc., Los Altos, CA, from 2001 through 2004 and with MIT as Associate Professor from 2005-2013. He received the 2006 IBM Faculty Partnership Award, and the 2009 NSF CAREER Award as well as the 2008 ICCAD William J. McCalla, 2008 IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging, and 2010 ISSCC Jack Raper best paper awards. He was an IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society Distinguished Lecturer for the 2012-2013 term.

Talk

"Colloquium - More-than-Moore with Integrated Silicon-Photonics" In this talk, Professor Stojanovic will present the latest results on the integration of silicon-photonic interconnects into a monolithic platform (45nm SOI logic process and bulk CMOS memory periphery process). These include world’s first microprocessor communicating to the outside world with monolithically integrated Si-Photonic devices, as well as first demonstrations of photonics in bulk CMOS processes. Prof. Stojanovic will also illustrate some critical aspects of this technology that need to be addressed from integration, circuits and systems side, in order to realize the full energy-efficiency and bandwidth-density potential of this technology. Moreover, just like integrating the inductor into CMOS in 1990s revolutionized the RF design and enabled mobile revolution, integration of silicon-photonic active and passive devices with CMOS is greatly positioned to revolutionize a number of analog and mixed-signal applications – low-phase noise signal sources, large bandwidth, high-resolution ADCs, and photonic phase arrays, to name a few. [post_title] => Colloquium - More-than-Moore with Integrated Silicon-Photonics [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => colloquium-more-than-moore-with-integrated-silicon-photonics [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-25 17:16:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-26 00:16:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11469 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11465 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-09-25 16:52:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-25 23:52:34 [post_content] =>

When

Tuesday, October 3, 2017 10:30-11:30 a.m. PST

Where

EEB 105 Electrical Engineering Building

Speaker

Dr. Robert Heath

Robert Heath

Biography

Robert W. Heath Jr. received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He is a Cullen Trust for Higher Education Endowed Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is a member of the Wireless Networking and Communications Group. He is also the president and CEO of MIMO Wireless Inc. and chief innovation officer at Kuma Signals LLC. Heath is a recipient of the 2012 Signal Processing Magazine Best Paper award, a 2013 Signal Processing Society best paper award, the 2014 EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing best paper award, the 2014 Journal of Communications and Networks best paper award, the 2016 IEEE Communications Society Fred W. Ellersick Prize and the 2016 IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award. His books include “Introduction to Wireless Digital Communication” (Prentice Hall; 2017), “Digital Wireless Communication: Physical Layer Exploration Lab Using the NI USRP” (National Technology and Science Press; 2012) and “Millimeter Wave Wireless Communications” (co-author; Prentice Hall; 2014). Heath is a licensed amateur radio operator, a registered professional engineer in Texas and a Fellow of IEEE.

Talk

'Millimeter Wave communication using out-of-band information"

Abstract

The overhead associated with establishing and operating the link is a major source of inefficiency in millimeter wave communication systems.  One significant source of overhead is the time spent training the transmit and receive beams, which occurs during estimation, feedback, channel tracking. Fortunately, there is side information available through sensing or communication available in bands outside of the millimeter wave communication band. This talk explains why beam configuration in millimeter wave systems is a major source of overhead. It then shows how out-of-band information can be used to reduce that overhead. Different types of out-of-band data are described including position, channel state information derived from another communication band, and sensing in the form of radar and video. Examples of the application of out-of-band information are shown including leveraging inverse finger printing and weighted compressed beam training.

[post_title] => Colloquium - Millimeter Wave communication using out-of-band information [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => colloquium-millimeter-wave-communication-using-out-of-band-information [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-25 16:52:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-25 23:52:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11465 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11390 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-19 09:13:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:13:31 [post_content] => Welcome to UW EE!  Please join us for our 2017 Graduate Student Orientation to meet with faculty, staff and fellow graduate students.  Over two days we’ll introduce you to the department, with speakers ranging from UW EE faculty and advisers to the Graduate Student Association, and to the UW campus, with speakers including campus police and representatives from the academic student employee union.

Tuesday’s agenda

  • 9–9:30 a.m.  Continental breakfast.  Kane 225.
  • 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.  TA training (required for all new Ph.D. candidates).  Kane 225.
  • 12:30–12:50 p.m.  Lunch.  Kane 225.
  • 12:50–1 p.m.  Welcome by Radha Poovendran, UW EE Professor and Chair.  Kane 225.
  • 1–2 p.m.  Faculty panel.  Kane 225.
  • 2–2:30 p.m.  Safety (with UW Police).  Kane 225.
  • 2:30–3 p.m.  UAW Local 4121 — Academic student employee union.  Kane 225.
  • 3–3:45 p.m.  Break.  Kane 225.
  • 3:45–4:30 p.m.  Faculty research overview.  Kane 225.
  • 4:30–6 p.m.  Faculty and student social — with games and refreshments!  Sylvan Grove (if rain — EEB Second Floor Atrium).

Locations

[post_title] => Graduate Student Orientation 2017 -- Tuesday [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-orientation-2017-tuesday [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 09:17:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:17:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11390 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11389 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-19 09:06:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:06:50 [post_content] => Welcome to UW EE!  Please join us for our 2017 Graduate Student Orientation to meet with faculty, staff and fellow graduate students.  Over two days we'll introduce you to the department, with speakers ranging from UW EE faculty and advisers to the Graduate Student Association, and to the UW campus, with speakers including campus police and representatives from the academic student employee union.

Monday's agenda

  • 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.  Campus tour (optional).  Meet in the Paul Allen Center Atrium by the UW EE main office.
  • 1–2 p.m.  Welcome to UW EE (with faculty and advising staff).  EEB 303.
  • 2–3:30 p.m.  Welcome by UW EE's Graduate Student Association (GSA).  EEB 303.
  • 3:30-5 p.m.  Scavenger hunt with the GSA.
  • 5–10 p.m.  GSA social with new and current graduate students.  Gas Works Park.

Locations

[post_title] => Graduate Student Orientation 2017 -- Monday [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-orientation-2017-monday [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 09:16:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:16:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11389 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11388 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-18 17:45:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 00:45:59 [post_content] => Welcome to EE! Our departmental orientation will provide great opportunities to meet faculty, tour labs, connect with student organizations and staff and to mingle with other newly admitted EE students. It is free, lunch will be provided and it is the best way to start your time in EE!

When & Where

  • Monday, Sept. 25th
  • 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.  Please arrive between 10:45 and 10:55 a.m.
  • EEB Room 125
[post_title] => Undergraduate Orientation 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-orientation-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-19 09:31:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 16:31:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11388 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11387 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-09-18 17:27:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-19 00:27:59 [post_content] => We're excited to welcome you to the department and give you an opportunity to connect with our PMP faculty, staff and fellow students! In addition to a meet and greet over hors d'oeuvres and drinks, you'll hear directly from our faculty about the classes they're teaching in the program this upcoming year. We'll then cover all the nuts and bolts of the PMP including degree requirements, registration, Husky Card basics and computing resources. Finally, you'll hear from some of our current students and recent graduates on their experiences in the program. We'll leave plenty of time for questions as well.

When & Where

  • Wednesday, Sept. 20
  • 6–8 p.m.
  • UW Club – Cascade Room
[post_title] => PMP Orientation 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => pmp-orientation-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-18 17:28:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-19 00:28:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11387 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11208 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-08-17 23:26:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-18 06:26:16 [post_content] => The Dean W. Lytle Electrical Engineering Endowed Lecture Series is the Department of Electrical Engineering's premiere annual event, featuring internationally-renowned researchers in the field of communications and signal processing. Lectures are free and open to the public.

When & Where

RSVP

Please RSVP for the Lytle Lecture here.

Talk

"Millimeter Wave Communication: From Origins to Disruptive Applications"

Millimeter wave (mmWave) communication has become an incubator for the rebirth of wireless communications. It is already being used in commercial applications such as WLAN, and trials of mmWave technology for 5G are underway.  Robert Heath believes that mmWave is also a conduit for revolutionary applications that require high data rate and low latency. In this talk, Heath explains the concepts of  bandwidth, data rate, latency and MIMO communication, which are essential to understanding the benefits provided by mmWave technology. Heath reviews the history and evolution of mmWave technology from its origins to the present day. He concludes by proposing disruptive applications of mmWave to areas such as vehicular and aerial communications, wearable networks, robotics and factory automation.

Speaker

Robert Heath (The University of Texas at Austin)

Robert W. Heath Jr. received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He is a Cullen Trust for Higher Education Endowed Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is a member of the Wireless Networking and Communications Group. He is also the president and CEO of MIMO Wireless Inc. and chief innovation officer at Kuma Signals LLC. Heath is a recipient of the 2012 Signal Processing Magazine Best Paper award, a 2013 Signal Processing Society best paper award, the 2014 EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing best paper award, the 2014 Journal of Communications and Networks best paper award, the 2016 IEEE Communications Society Fred W. Ellersick Prize and the 2016 IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award. His books include "Introduction to Wireless Digital Communication” (Prentice Hall; 2017), "Digital Wireless Communication: Physical Layer Exploration Lab Using the NI USRP” (National Technology and Science Press; 2012) and “Millimeter Wave Wireless Communications” (co-author; Prentice Hall; 2014). Heath is a licensed amateur radio operator, a registered professional engineer in Texas and a Fellow of IEEE. [post_title] => 2017 Dean W. Lytle Lecture [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => lytle2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-25 14:33:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-25 21:33:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11208 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11163 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-08-03 16:29:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-03 23:29:03 [post_content] =>

Special Seminar: Leveraging Advances in Computational Electrodynamics to Enable New Kinds of Nanophotonic Devices

When

September 7, 2017 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Where

Electrical Engineering Building, room 303

Abstract

Advances in computational electrodynamics have the potential to enable fundamentally new kinds of nanophotonic devices which are based principally on complex, non-analytical wave-interference effects. Powerful, flexible, open-source software tools have now been made available for use in large-scale, parallel computations to model the interaction of light with practically any kind of material in any arbitrary geometry. These recent developments in computational capability make possible the investigation of various emergent structures, materials, and physical phenomena that were previously beyond the reach of theoretical methods and even commercial software tools which tend to be less versatile and even less readily available to academic researchers and small groups. Computational electromagnetics may be broadly divided into two categories: differential-equation and integral-equation solvers. This seminar will cover both. We will first demonstrate how advances in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods via the open-source package MEEP can lead to new designs for light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells as well as light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Then we will discuss two applications of surface-integral-equation algorithms via the open-source package SCUFF-EM. These include designing antennas defined by periodic and aperiodic nanopatterning with polarization-sensitive frequency response, and optimizing the shapes and material content of asymmetric nanoparticles to maximize radiative heat transfer, Casimir forces, and other phenomena induced by thermal and quantum-mechanical fluctuations. Finally, we will describe efforts by our startup, Simpetus, to leverage on-demand, scalable, high-performance computing (HPC) in the public cloud for large-scale device design.

Speaker Bios

Ardavan Oskooi is the Founder and CEO of Simpetus, a San Francisco-based startup accelerating innovation and discovery in electromagnetics with simulations. Simpetus is a reference to our vision for simulations being an impetus for new discoveries and technologies. Ardavan received his Sc.D. from MIT where he worked with Professors Steven G. Johnson and John D. Joannopoulos to develop MEEP (thesis: Computation & Design for Nanophotonics). Ardavan has published 13 first-author articles in peer-reviewed journals, 3 issued patents, and the book Advances in FDTD Computational Electrodynamics: Photonics and Nanotechnology. Ardavan has a masters in Computation for Design and Optimization from MIT and completed his undergraduate studies, with honors, in Engineering Science at the University of Toronto. Prior to launching Simpetus, Ardavan worked as a postdoctoral researcher with Professors Susumu Noda at Kyoto University and Stephen R. Forrest at the University of Michigan on leveraging MEEP to push the frontier of optoelectronic device design.  M.T. Homer Reid is Lecturer in Applied Mathematics at MIT, where his research encompasses computational electromagnetics as well as computational quantum field theory and chemistry. Homer completed his PhD in physics at MIT, where he worked with Professors Jacob White and Steven G. Johnson to create the fluctuating-surface-current approach to fluctuational electrodynamics. Homer is the developer of the SCUFF-EM package for surface-integral modeling of deterministic and fluctuational electromagnetism problems. Before completing his PhD in theoretical physics, Homer worked as an experimental condensed-matter physicist and as an analog/RF integrated-circuit designer at a semiconductor company. [post_title] => Special Seminar: Leveraging Advances in Computational Electrodynamics to Enable New Kinds of Nanophotonic Devices [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => special-seminar-leveraging-advances-in-computational-electrodynamics-to-enable-new-kinds-of-nanophotonic-devices [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-03 16:31:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-03 23:31:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11163 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11135 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-07-31 15:22:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-31 22:22:34 [post_content] =>

You're Invited!

Please join the UW Department of Electrical Engineering on November 2nd for our third annual Bay Area Alumni Reception. Because the previous years' events were met with resounding success, the department is pleased to host another reception for our alums in the Bay Area. To view photos from last year's event, please look at our online album here. Hors d'oeuvres and refreshments (beer, wine and non-alcoholic beverages) will be provided. Contact: events@ee.washington.edu

When & Where

RSVP

Please RSVP for the event by October 23, 2017. RSVP here.

Faculty in Attendance

Radha Poovendran

Radha Poovendran

  • Professsor and Chair
  • Security, biosystems and machine learning.
Matt Reynolds

Matt Reynolds

  • Associate Professor; Associate Chair for Research and Entrepreneurship
  • RFID, ultra-low power sensing and computation, energy harvesting, wireless power transfer (WPT) and smart materials, surfaces and spaces.
Payman Arabshahi

Payman Arabshahi

  • Associate Professor; UW EE Director of Advancement
  • Underwater and space communications, wireless networks, power system optimization, smart grid, data mining and search, and signal processing.
Blake Hannaford

Blake Hannaford

  • Professsor
  • Control theory, biorobotics, telerobotic surgery, functional electrical stimulation, neural system control and haptic rendering.
Chris Rudell

Chris Rudell

  • Associate Professsor
  • RF, mm-Wave, Analog and Mixed-Signal Systems applied to biomedical devices including neural interfaces, communication systems, and imaging technology.
Joshua Smith

Josh Smith

  • Professsor
  • Sensor systems, wireless power, RF and other power harvesting, sensing for robotics and ubiquitous computing.

John Sahr

  • Professsor; Associate Chair for Education and Entrepreneurship
  • Ionospheric physics; electrojet turbulence; passive bistatic radar; radar remote sensing; radar waveform design; radar interferometry; and statistical signal processing.

Parking

There will complimentary parking for all guests. [post_title] => 2017 Bay Area Alumni Reception [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 2017-bay-area-reception [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-18 11:29:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-18 18:29:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11135 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11128 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-07-31 14:04:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-31 21:04:38 [post_content] => Are you an engineering, math or physical sciences student interested in graduate school in electrical engineering? Join us to learn more about our programs for MSEE (daytime) and Ph.D. degrees. Current UW EE graduate students and an academic adviser will be available to answer questions! Topics
  • Preparation and admissions
  • Master’s vs. Ph.D. programs
  • Degree requirements
  • Research groups and more!
Questions? Contact: grad@ee.washington.edu

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

  • 5:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303
[post_title] => Graduate Programs Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-programs-information-session-august-2-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-31 14:04:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-31 21:04:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11128 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [14] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10669 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-05-19 09:25:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-19 16:25:13 [post_content] => Join Dr. Uday Desai to hear about opportunities with India Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (IITH)! Time: 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. Where: EEB 045 IIT Hyderabad is looking for young dynamic faculty with a strong research record. This meeting is to give a perspective on IIT Hyderabad and also have a dialog with Ph.D. students who have an interest in a faculty position at IIT Hyderabad. IIT Hyderabad started in June 2008 and today it has 14 departments, 175 full time faculty, 2127 students of which 668 are Ph.D. students, 500 Masters students and rest undergraduate students. In a short time IITH has made its mark in research and teaching; IITH has sanction research funding of US dollars 45 million. On the academic front IITH has started a very novel program, referred to as Fractal Academics. IITH has a unique and strong collaboration with Japan. Besides, over 120 research and teaching labs, IITH has 3 incubators to promote entrepreneurship: iTIC -- IIT Hyderabad Technology Incubator, Center for Healthcare Entrepreneurship and Fabless Chip Design Incubator. [post_title] => Dr. Uday Desai IITH Opportunity Info Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-uday-desai-iith-opportunity-info-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-19 13:39:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-19 20:39:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10669 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [15] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10633 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-05-11 16:27:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:27:58 [post_content] => Are you an engineering, math or physical sciences student interested in graduate school in electrical engineering? Join us to learn more about our programs for MSEE (daytime) and Ph.D. degrees. Current UW EE graduate students and an academic adviser will be available to answer questions! Topics
  • Preparation and admissions
  • Master’s vs. Ph.D. programs
  • Degree requirements
  • Research groups and more!
Questions? Contact: grad@ee.washington.edu

Thursday, May 18, 2017

  • 5:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303
[post_title] => Graduate Programs Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-programs-information-session-may-18-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:27:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:27:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10633 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [16] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10399 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:52 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-dec-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:16:30 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:16:30 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10399 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [17] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10398 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:51:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:51:12 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-nov-9-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:17:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:17:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10398 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [18] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10397 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:50:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:50:25 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-oct-12-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:17:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:17:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10397 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [19] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10396 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:49:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:49:39 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-sept-14-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:17:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:17:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10396 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [20] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10395 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:48:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:48:48 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-aug-10-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:18:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:18:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10395 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [21] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10394 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:47:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:47:49 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, July 13, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-july-13-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:18:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:18:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10394 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [22] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10393 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 16:47:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 23:47:01 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, June 8, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => Undergraduate Prospective Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => undergraduate-prospective-information-session-june-8-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-11 16:19:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-11 23:19:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10393 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [23] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10392 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-14 15:55:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-14 22:55:09 [post_content] => Electrical engineering is a broad and fascinating discipline with exciting career possibilities.  Our research areas include the internet of things, robotics, machine learning, computer vision, machine vision, satellite communication systems, low-power networks, next-generation WWAN (5G), small cell technologies, next-generation Wi-Fi, SOC architecture, wearable technologies and thermal and power management. Join us to chat with our Advising team about an undergraduate major in electrical engineering!

Thursday, May 11, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
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capstone-fair-website-header_v3

UW EE capstones are the culmination of a student’s electrical engineering education.  On Tuesday, May 30, we are proud to present our inaugural Capstone Fair, where students will present their projects to peers, industry professionals and faculty.

2017 Details

When

  • Tuesday, May 30
  • 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Where

  • HUB South Ballroom

Project Examples

capstone-project-examples

Companies Sponsoring the Entrepreneurial Capstones

Some of the students presenting their work during the fair are part of ENGINE -- our Engineering Entrepreneurial Capstone program.  ENGINE projects are collaborative efforts made possible thanks to generous sponsorship from company partners.  Our 2017 sponsoring companies include: Blue Origin, Booz Allen Hamilton, dToor, Echodyne, Fluke, Fizikl, Millenium Space Systems, Nvidia, Plugable Technologies, Seattle Department of Transportation, Seattle Mountain Rescue, Tupl, UW Medicine, Voicebox and Wally Labs.

Parking and Map

For Industry Partners

Please refer to these parking instructions.

Campus Map

  • Please refer to the campus map and search for the Husky Union Building (HUB).
  • There will be signs in the HUB, leading to the event.
  [post_title] => 2017 UW EE Capstone Fair [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => uw-ee-capstone-fair-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-30 08:44:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-30 15:44:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10357 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [25] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10313 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-04-07 16:12:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-07 23:12:34 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 25, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Programmable Photonic Communication Systems"

Photonics is increasingly more attractive as a technology platform for addressing technological barriers facing bedrock high technology areas including next generation microprocessors and computing platforms, high speed communication systems, wireless networks and smart cities. Integrated photonics, coupled with decades of technological maturation, is enabling more complex, multi-component photonic systems that are essential in these applications. Software control together with photonic integration in particular form a vehicle for these photonic systems to scale and find widespread application. The resultant combination of basic physical phenomena, complex material and device architectures, application requirements and software control is opening up new interdisciplinary research problems. In this talk, I will review recent technological trends around integrated photonics and data communications and computing. Fiber optical communication systems, in particular, are at the leading edge of these trends. I will describe a long standing problem facing optically switched communication networks, which is the bottleneck created by peering requirements at Internet exchange points (IXP). Software defined networking (SDN) and integrated photonic devices are used to provide an optical layer peering mechanism with service level agreement (SLA) enforcement. Using 100 Gb/s polarization multiplexed quadrature phase shift keyed (PM-QPSK) optical signals, high capacity can be delivered with low latency across multiple network domains, a critical requirement expected for 5G mobile and data center interconnection (DCI) networks.

Speaker

Dan Kilper

Daniel Kilper (University of Arizona)

Daniel Kilper is a research professor in the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He holds a joint appointment in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Arizona and an adjunct faculty position in electrical engineering at Columbia University. He received a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Michigan in 1996. From 2000-2013 he was a member of technical staff at Bell Labs. Within both academia and industry, he has made contributions in the area of communication devices and networks primarily spanning three areas: energy efficient communication networks, optical performance monitoring and dynamic optical networks. He is a senior member of IEEE and is an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Green Communications and Networking and a steering committee member for the IEEE Green ICT Initiative. He currently serves as administrative director for the Center for Integrated Access Networks, an NSF Engineering Research Center and has served in leadership positions in multi-university/industry consortia including the Center for Telecommunications Value Chain Research (CTVR), Center for Energy Efficient Telecommunications (CEET) and the GreenTouch Consortium. His work has been recognized with the Bell Labs President's Gold Medal Award and he served on the Bell Labs President’s Advisory Council on Research. He holds seven patents and authored four book chapters and more than one hundred thirty peer-reviewed publications.

  [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Dan Kilper [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-dan-kilper [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-11 14:07:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-11 21:07:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10313 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [26] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10230 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-03-28 11:56:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-28 18:56:57 [post_content] => Casino Night 2017 Casino Night 2017 is here!  This popular event, hosted by the student-run IEEE/HKN society, is for electrical engineering and computer science students and industry representatives only.  With both casual gaming and designated time for recruitment, the evening is a fun, relaxed environment where professionals in the field can talk personally with students about their goals and interests.  More than 80 students had the opportunity to mingle and chat with eight companies at Casino Night 2016. Light food and beverages are provided. And UW EE faculty serve as the dealers!

When & Where

For Industry

Chat with up-and-coming electrical and computer science engineers in a relaxed, fun environment!
  • Register via Eventbrite (Password: UWIEEEHKN)
  • Deadline:  April 10, 2017
  • Cost:  $100 for Casino Night 2017 / $250 for Casino Night 2017 + 1 tech talk in autumn quarter 2017
  • Questions:  Contact the IEEE/HKN officers.

For Students

Come network with company representatives from Microsoft, ESI and more over casino games and dinner!  Dress is business casual.  Resumes are strongly recommended -- you can either upload yours in advance via the Catalyst drop box or bring print copies with you.
  • Register via Eventbrite
  • Cost: Free for IEEE members; $5 for non-members.
  • Deadline:  Students can continue to register throughout the event.
[post_title] => Casino Night 2017 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => casino-night-2017 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-07 10:37:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-07 17:37:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10230 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [27] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10088 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-03-06 21:39:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-07 05:39:10 [post_content] => 2017 Puget Sound Alumni Mixer

When

  • Thursday, May 4, 2017
  • 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Where

  • Amazon Campus Van Vorst Library 426 Terry Ave. N., Seattle, WA 98109

Getting There

Please refer to this map for the event location. For event parking, there is plenty of street parking after 6:00 p.m. There is also a public paid parking garage off of Harrison St., between Terry Ave. N. and Boren Ave. Another paid parking garage is off of Harrison St., between Westlake Ave. N. and Terry Ave. N.

Building Access

Upon arrival, attendees will need to check in at the front desk. Amazon security will provide a badge for each person and offer directions to the event.

RSVP

We're so sorry, but we've reached capacity for this event and closed registration.  To keep abreast of upcoming opportunities to connect with UW EE, please visit our Alumni page.  Hope to see you at our next Puget Sound area event!

About the Event

For the second year in a row, we are fortunate to have Vice-President of Amazon and UW EE Affiliate Professor Babak Parviz host the Department of Electrical Engineering alumni mixer at Amazon’s campus. The evening is an opportunity for guests to network with each other and meet current UW EE leadership and faculty while hearing about today’s research. Due to the overwhelming response last year, please note space is limited and registration will close when capacity has been reached. We encourage you to RSVP early. Hosts: 
rp-headhsot

Radha Poovendran Professor and Chair

Research areas: Security, biosystems and machine learning
bp-headshot

Babak Parviz VP at Amazon and Affiliate Professor

Research areas:
High-tech with social impact

Featured Faculty Members: 
pa-headshot

Payman Arabshahi Associate Professor

Research areas: Underwater and space communications
la-headhsot

Les Atlas Professor

Research areas:
Signal processing for dynamical systems

bd-headshot

Bruce Darling Professor

Research areas: Integrated sensor development
Assistant Professor Lillian Ratliff

Lillian Ratliff Assistant Professor

Research areas:
Next-generation urban infrastructure systems

mr-headshot

Matt Reynolds Associate Professor

Research areas:
Smart materials, RFID and WPT

Sahr_John__1457645790_128.95.215.177

John Sahr
Professor

Research areas: Ionospheric physics and radar remote sensing
ms-headshot

Mani Soma Professor

Research areas: Mixed-signal, RF, high-frequency ICs
bz-headshot

Baosen Zhang Assistant Professor

Research areas:
Smart cities and power systems

[post_title] => The 2017 Puget Sound Alumni Mixer [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-puget-sound-alumni-mixer [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-02 16:10:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-02 23:10:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=10088 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [28] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9893 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-02-16 16:52:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-17 00:52:54 [post_content] =>

When

Saturday, April 22 9-10:30 a.m.

Where

EE Building — Upper Basement Benton Lane Seattle WA 98195 (For directions, download this PDF.) [caption id="attachment_10483" align="aligncenter" width="625"]entrance for Discovery Days Alumni Breakfast Look for the exterior entrance as pictured on the left, then choose the doors that lead you to the UW EE administrative offices. From there, follow the signs to join us for breakfast![/caption]

RSVP

We're so sorry -- we have reached capacity and closed registration for this event.  We invite you to still visit campus to enjoy Discovery Days exhibits, and we hope you can join us for breakfast next year!

About the Event

The UW College of Engineering's Discovery Days (April 21-22) is a great opportunity for students and families from all over the Puget Sound region to join for hands-on activities (like discovering the mechanics behind making a pickle glow and a robot shake hands). The Department of Electrical Engineering will hold an exclusive breakfast for our alumni and their children or grandchildren for a sneak preview of the Discovery Days exhibits before they are open to the general public. It’s a tradition we started last year with great response from the EE community. We look forward to meeting your family at the breakfast. View a selection of photos from last year's Discovery Days: 2016 Discovery Days

Parking on Campus

Upon Arrival to Campus

  • Stop at a campus gatehouse and advise the Parking Specialist that you are attending the “EE Alumni Breakfast” in the Electrical Engineering Department.
  • A parking permit, with the closest available parking lot, will be printed and given to you to display on your vehicle's dashboard as instructed.
  • If you need disability accommodations, please advise the Parking Specialist.

 Estimated Saturday Morning Parking Rates

  • Surface Parking Lots: $5, arrival prior to 12 p.m. (noon) on Saturday.
  • Central Plaza Garage: $10, arrival prior to 12 p.m. (noon) on Saturday.
Note: If your visit is less than one hour, be sure to stop at a campus gatehouse as you exit for a prorated refund.  Please contact the Transportation Services, Events Office at 206.616.8710 or via email at tsevents@uw.edu if you have any questions or need further assistance with your parking arrangement at the University of Washington, Seattle Campus. [post_title] => The 2017 Discovery Days: Alumni Breakfast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-2017-discovery-days-alumni-breakfast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 13:06:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 20:06:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9893 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [29] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9831 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-02-02 14:19:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-02 22:19:32 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Building Secure-Aware Cyber-Physical Systems: A Satisfiability Modulo Convex Optimization Approach"

The rapidly increasing dependence on cyber-physical systems (CPS) in building critical infrastructures — in the context of smart cities, power grids, medical devices and self-driving cars — has opened the gates to increasingly sophisticated and harmful attacks with financial, societal, criminal or political effects. While a traditional cyber-attack may leak credit-card or other personal sensitive information, a CPS-attack can lead to a loss of control in nuclear reactors, gas turbines, the power grid, transportation networks and other critical infrastructure, placing the nation’s security, economy and public safety at risk. I will start this talk by motivating for the differences between CPS-security and cyber-security. To this end, I will show experimental results on non-invasive sensor spoofing attacks targeting the anti-lock brake systems (ABS) in automobiles. As the need for CPS-security becomes evident,  I will focus on a problem known as "secure state estimation.” It aims to estimate the state of a dynamical system when an adversary arbitrarily corrupts a subset of its sensors.  Although of critical importance, this problem is NP-hard and combinatorial in nature since the subset of attacked sensors is unknown. I will show that the "secure state estimation" is a special case of a larger class of logic formulas, termed satisfiability modulo convex (SMC) formulas. I will present then a new satisfiability modulo convex procedure that uses a lazy combination of Boolean satisfiability solving and convex programming to provide a satisfying assignment or determine that the formula is unsatisfiable. I will finish by showing, through multiple experimental and simulation results that SMC solvers outperform other techniques when used to solve the secure state estimation problem.

Speaker

Yasser Shoukry

Yasser Shoukry (UC Berkeley)

Yasser Shoukry is a postdoctoral scholar at the EECS Department at UC Berkeley, the EE Department at UCLA and the ESE Department at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from UCLA in 2015 where he was affiliated with both the Cyber-Physical Systems Lab as well as the Networked and Embedded Systems Lab. Before joining UCLA, he spent four years as an R&D engineer in the industry of automotive embedded systems. His research interests include the design and implementation of secure- and privacy-aware cyber-physical systems and Internet of Things (IoT) by drawing on tools from control theory, optimization theory, embedded systems and formal methods. Shoukry is the recipient of the Best Paper Award from the International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS) in 2016. He is also the recipient of the UCLA EE Distinguished Ph.D. Dissertation Award in 2016, the UCLA Chancellors prize in 2011 and 2012, UCLA EE Graduate Division Fellowship in 2011 and 2012 and the UCLA EE Preliminary Exam Fellowship in 2012. In 2015, Shoukry led the UCLA/Caltech/CMU team to win the first place in the NSF Early Career Investigators (NSF-ECI) research challenge. His team represented the NSF-ECI in the NIST Global Cities Technology Challenge, an initiative designed to advance the deployment of IoT technologies within a smart city. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Yasser Shoukry [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-yasser-shoukry [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-08 16:32:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 00:32:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9831 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [30] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9800 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-31 13:08:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:08:07 [post_content] =>

Monday, Feb. 27, 2017

  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
[post_title] => BSMS Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => bsms-program-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 13:08:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:08:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9800 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [31] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9798 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-31 13:00:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:00:09 [post_content] =>

Are you an engineering, math or physical sciences student interested in graduate school in electrical engineering? Please join us to learn more about the daytime MSEE and Ph.D. programs in electrical engineering. Current UW EE graduate students and advisers will be available to answer questions!

Topics

  • Preparation and admissions
  • Master’s vs. Ph.D. programs
  • Degree requirements
  • Research groups
  • And more!

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017

  • 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  • EEB 303 (For directions, download this PDF.)
  [post_title] => Graduate Programs Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => graduate-programs-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 13:01:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 21:01:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9798 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [32] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9783 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-26 16:07:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-27 00:07:08 [post_content] =>

On-campus information sessions give prospective students an opportunity for one-on-one conversation with the Professional Programs Advising Office and faculty. Sessions provide a comprehensive overview of the Electrical Engineering Professional Master’s Program, including admissions requirements, deadlines, PMP curriculum and the PMP community. We invite you to attend!

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Stay Updated

Join the PMP mailing list to stay up to date on upcoming information sessions, application deadlines and other program activities. [post_title] => Professional Master's Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professional-masters-program-information-session-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 12:56:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 20:56:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9783 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [33] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9781 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-26 16:05:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-27 00:05:33 [post_content] =>

On-campus information sessions give prospective students an opportunity for one-on-one conversation with the Professional Programs Advising Office and faculty. Sessions provide a comprehensive overview of the Electrical Engineering Professional Master’s Program, including admissions requirements, deadlines, PMP curriculum and the PMP community. We invite you to attend!

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017

Stay Updated

Join the PMP mailing list to stay up to date on upcoming information sessions, application deadlines and other program activities. [post_title] => Professional Master's Program Information Session [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => professional-masters-program-information-session [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-31 12:56:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-31 20:56:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9781 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [34] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9677 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-23 10:52:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-23 18:52:23 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Next-Generation Computing using Spin-Based and 2D Materials"

We are at a time where the electronics industry is feeling pressure from two sides: on the small scale we are facing the fundamental physical limits of silicon, and on the large scale we are facing new big-data applications, such as for the internet of things. The future of computing will require both more energy-efficient electronics and more big-data-driven, application-specific designs. Magnetic devices are a promising candidate for future electronics, due to their low voltage operation, nonvolatility and low thermal budget, which can open up new energy-efficient, normally-off, memory-in-computing, 3D monolithic architectures. Magnetic materials are one of the few materials systems that can be more energy efficient than silicon transistors for memory and logic, and have been shown to be more energy efficient and faster than other emerging resistive memories. Additionally, the emerging class of 2D materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have little to no surface roughness with monolayer thickness, and thus 2D transistors can be scaled without sacrificing mobility. They have the benefits of flexibility and low thermal budget, and new physics we can utilize such as the valley Hall effect. Thus, spin-based and 2D materials are very important classes of materials to explore for beyond-CMOS devices and systems. I will present experimental results using three-terminal spin switches to build practical magnetic logic devices and circuits and show they satisfy the requirements for beyond-CMOS devices. We show a single device can act as an inverter, and we are able to propagate bits between the spin switches to build up circuits. I will also show our work on voltage control of the spin and valley Hall effect in TMD materials, which could be used for future 2D-magnetic hybrid devices. I will discuss the future directions of this work, including building energy-efficient 3D monolithic systems of these emerging technologies, and looking further to quantum computing.

Speaker

Jean Anne Incorvia

Jean Anne Incorvia (Stanford University)

Jean Anne C. Incorvia is a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford University in electrical engineering and a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley electrical engineering and computer science. She received her Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University in 2015, cross-registered at MIT, where she was a Department of Energy Graduate Student Fellow. She received her bachelor’s in physics from UC Berkeley in 2008. Her research focuses on emerging materials and devices for nanoelectronics. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Jean Anne Incorvia [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-jean-anne-incorvia [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-23 10:53:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-23 18:53:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9677 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [35] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 9648 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2017-01-13 15:43:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-13 23:43:53 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Connectivity Meets Computing: A Wireless Networking Perspective"

Networks of tomorrow are more about “user quality of experience” than they are about “network quality of service.” Wireless mobile networks, being an integral part of such a vision, will need to evolve from their current generation (4G LTE) to a more radical one (5G) to cater to such expectations. While connectivity will continue being a key enabler in such a transformation, one cannot ignore the confluence of connectivity and computing that is pervading the mobile ecosystem, both on the user side (e.g. smart phones, wearables) as well as on the network side (e.g. software-defined mobile networks). This talk will draw from some of my works that aim to push the envelope in connectivity as well as its confluence with computing from the perspective of wireless networks. In the space of connectivity, I will motivate the need for a radically new wireless access paradigm called “Access Asynchronously, Transmit Synchronously” (A2TS) to meet the demands of future 5G networks. A2TS brings together the best of two highly disparate wireless technologies — asynchronous Wi-Fi that enables scalable, coexistence-friendly deployments and synchronous LTE that delivers superior performance through advanced wireless techniques. I will discuss how to design the A2TS access paradigm from first principles, and then illustrate its real-world potential by building a scalable, network MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output) system using 802.11ac access points. In leveraging the synergy between connectivity and computing, I will highlight the growing importance of clouddriven radio access networks (C-RANs), especially for dense deployments (e.g. event centers, stadiums, urban hot-spots); then introduce the notion of a “software-defined front-haul” (SDF) network that we developed for C-RANs. I will show why SDFs are the key to unlocking the true potential of SDN in wireless access and how they can be dynamically orchestrated to not only optimize individual user and traffic performance, but also contribute to green (energy-efficient) computing in the network. I will conclude by sharing some thoughts on how mobile connectivity and computing need to evolve to support the heterogeneous demands and diversity of future mobile services that range from massive scale IoT to mobile augmented/virtual reality.

Speaker

Karthik Sundaresan

Karthik Sundaresan (NEC Labs America)

Karthikeyan Sundaresan is a senior researcher in the mobile communications and networking research department at NEC Labs America. He received his MS and Ph.D. From the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech. His research interests are broadly in wireless networking and mobile computing, and span both algorithm design as well as system prototyping. He is the recipient of several best paper awards at prestigious ACM and IEEE conferences (MobiHoc, CoNEXT, ICNP, SECON), and is the recipient of ACM Sigmobile’s Rockstar award (2016) for early career contributions to the field of mobile computing. He holds over twenty patents and received a business contribution award from NEC for the technology commercialization of a wireless interference management solution for LTE small-cells. He is a senior member of IEEE and currently serves as an associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Karthik Sundaresan [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-karthik-sundaresan [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-13 15:45:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-13 23:45:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=9648 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [36] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8778 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 13:16:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 21:16:15 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 9, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Speakers

Grad Showcase

UW EE is proud to present our second annual Graduate Research Showcase Please join us to as eight graduate students present their research in rapid-fire five-minute talks. The topics span a range of areas and show the breadth of research in the department!
[caption id="attachment_10496" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Sandamali Devadithya Sandamali Devadithya: “Accelerated millimeter wave image reconstruction”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10497" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Taylor Fryett Taylor Fryett: “Patterning enabled quasi-phase matching in 2D material clad optical micro-resonators”[/caption]
[caption id="attachment_10498" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Miles Gander Miles Gander: “Digital logic circuits in yeast with CRISPR-dCas9 NOR gates”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10499" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Ethan Keeler Ethan Keeler: “MEMS Resonant Mass Sensor with Enabled Optical Trapping”[/caption]
[caption id="attachment_10500" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Jimin Kim Jimin Kim: “Neural Interactome: Interactive Visualization of a Neuronal System”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10595" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Farah Nadeem Farah, Nadeem: “Convolutional Neural Network Based Text Classification for Educational Applications”[/caption]
[caption id="attachment_10501" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Apoorva Sharma Apoorva Sharma: “Dual Band HF/UHF Implant and External Antennas for Wireless Power and Backscatter Communication in Biomedical Devices”[/caption] [caption id="attachment_10502" align="aligncenter" width="150"]Astrini Sie Astrini Sie: “Soft tissue classification and diagnostic using a smart surgical grasper for robotic surgery”[/caption]
[post_title] => Research Colloquium: Grad Showcase [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-grad-showcase [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-04 11:26:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-04 18:26:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8778 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [37] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8777 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:24:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:24:27 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, May 23, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Overcoming diffraction and multiple-scattering limitations in optical imaging"

Optical computational imaging seeks enhanced performance and new functionality by the joint design of illumination, optics, detectors and reconstruction algorithms. Two remarkable examples discussed here enable overcoming the diffraction limit and imaging through complex media. Abbe’s resolution limit has been overcome after more than 130 years enabling unprecedented opportunities for optical imaging at the nanoscale. Fluorescence imaging using photoactivatable or photoswitchable molecules within computational optical systems offers single molecule sensitivity within a wide field of view. The advent of three-dimensional point spread function engineering associated with optimal reconstruction algorithms provides a unique approach to further increase resolution in three dimensions. Focusing and imaging through strongly scattering media has also been accomplished recently in the optical regime.  By using a feedback system and optical modulation, the resulting wavefronts overcome the effects of multiple scattering upon propagation through the medium. In particular, a phase-control holographic technique helps characterize scattering media at high-speed using micro-electro-mechanical technology, allowing focusing through a temporally dynamic, strongly scattering sample. Further, our recent investigations demonstrate the possibility of non-invasively imaging objects through a scattering medium using the photoacoustic effect while keeping the optical resolution.

Speaker

Rafael Piestun

Rafael Piestun (University of Colorado)

Rafael Piestun received MSc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. From 1998 to 2000 he was a researcher at Stanford University. Since 2001 he has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Physics at the University of Colorado – Boulder. Professor Piestun is a fellow of the Optical Society of America, was a Fulbright scholar, an Eshkol fellow, received a Honda Initiation Grant award, a Minerva award, a Provost Achievement Award and El-Op and Gutwirth prizes. He served in the editorial committee of Optics and Photonics News and was associate editor for Applied Optics. He was the director and principal investigator of the NSF-IGERT program in Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging at the University of Colorado and is co-principal investigator of the STROBE NSF Science and Technology Center. His areas of interest include computational optical imaging, superresolution microscopy, volumetric photonic devices, scattering optics and ultrafast optics. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Rafael Piestun [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-rafael-piestun [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-12 12:18:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-12 19:18:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8777 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [38] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8776 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:22:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:22:23 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 18, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Silicon-based Integrated Sensors and Systems with On-chip Antennas: From Picosecond Pulse Radiators to Miniaturized Spectrometers"

Today's silicon process technology makes it possible to integrate everything from antennas to processors on a single chip at almost no cost. This creates new opportunities for implementing complex sensors and systems on a millimeter scale. To create such devices, an understanding of physics, waves, electromagnetics and high-frequency electronics is essential. In this presentation, I will show how the convergence of these fields has resulted in single-chip picosecond pulse radiators, wirelessly synchronized chips with sub-psec synchronization accuracy, miniaturized spectrometers and wirelessly powered sensors and actuators. In the first section of the talk, I will present techniques for generating and detecting picosecond pulses, based on a novel laser-free Digital-to-Impulse (D2I) radiation. This technology can produce broadband pulses with a record width of 1.9psec that cover a frequency spectrum from 30GHz to 1.1THz and that have a resolution of 2Hz at 1THz. I will discuss how this technology enables us to perform broadband THz spectroscopy, hyper-spectral 3D imaging and Tbits/sec wireless communication. In the second part, I will present my work on precision time transfer and wireless synchronization of widely spaced chips. This technique eliminates the wires between the elements of a distributed array and makes it possible to build a highly flexible large aperture. In this section, I will also present my work on optical locking of microwave oscillators, which achieves a picosecond timing accuracy over a 1.5m distance. In the third section of the talk, I will focus on miniaturized spectrometers and sensors. I will discuss an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectrometer that is based on a single-chip full-duplex transceiver for detecting paramagnetic chemicals and free radicals. The EPR sensor technology developed in my laboratory has been successfully deployed in major oil and gas fields in the United States and Canada. This technology is used to monitor the concentration of asphaltenes (a chemical that clogs oil wells) in real-time and to minimize the use of environmentally hazardous chemical inhibitors in energy production. I will further present my recent work on wirelessly powered microchips with on-chip antennas. These microchips are designed to perform sensing, actuation and localization. I will provide examples of such microchips being used to pace the heart of a sheep and to trigger the leg movement of a rat. Finally, I will discuss the future directions of my research on building wirelessly powered single-chip electronic drugs for medical applications and electronic tracers for energy exploration as well as for industrial monitoring.

Speaker

Aydin Babakhani

Aydin Babakhani (Rice University)

Aydin Babakhani is a Louis Owen Junior Chair Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rice University and the director of Rice Integrated Systems and Circuits Laboratory. He received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology in 2003 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Caltech in 2005 and 2008, respectively. He was a postdoctoral scholar at Caltech in 2009 and a research scientist at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 2010. Babakhani has been awarded multiple best paper awards, including the Best Paper Award at the IEEE SiRF conference in 2016, the Best Paper Award at the IEEE RWS Symposium in 2015, the Best Paper Award at the IEEE IMS Symposium in 2014 and 2nd place in the Best Paper Awards at the IEEE APS Symposium 2016 and IEEE IMS Symposium 2016. He has published more than 85 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings and has 21 issued or pending patents. His research is supported by NSF, DARPA, AFOSR, ONR, the W. M. Keck Foundation, SRC and more than 10 companies. He received a prestigious NSF CAREER award in 2015, an Innovation Award from Northrop Grumman in 2014 and a DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2012. He also received the Caltech Electrical Engineering Department's Charles Wilts Best PhD Thesis Prize for his work titled “Near-Field Direct Antenna Modulation.” He was the recipient of the Microwave Graduate Fellowship in 2007, the Grand Prize in the Stanford–Berkeley–Caltech Innovators Challenge in 2006, the Analog Devices Inc. Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2005, as well as a Caltech Special Institute Fellowship and an Atwood Fellowship in 2003. He was also the Gold Medal winner at both the National Physics Competition in 1998 and the 30th International Physics Olympiad in Padova, Italy, in 1999. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Aydin Babakhani [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-aydin-babakhani [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-07 09:28:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-07 16:28:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8776 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [39] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8775 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:20:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:20:54 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, April 4, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Natural User Interface (NUI) has finally arrived!"

On March 2, 1992, Casper was introduced by Dr. Kai-Fu Lee at Apple on Good Morning America as the first speaker-independent continuous speech recognizer which could interact with human. Apple was too far ahead of time. The technology was not quite there. In 2004, Dr. Lee tried it again at Microsoft, advocating "NUI" (pronounced as /n uw iy/) or Natural User Interface and it was shut down once more. It wasn’t until 2010, after iPhone took over the world, that a personal assistant like Siri shed its light. The advancement and ubiquitous appearance of mobile devices renders NUI a great deal of sense, as typing on small devices is painful. The breakthrough deep neural network (DNN) in 2012 brought speech and image recognition accuracy to a new territory and rallied both research and industry. From then on, artificial intelligence (AI) is finally awake and large. Established companies and startups alike are placing their bets, hoping to be at the forefront of this evolution. Mobvoi, as an established startup, is one of these firms which are determined to play an important role in this historical evolution. I will talk about what our company does and what our vision is, and present some technical work we’ve built along the way.

Speaker

Mei-Yuh HwangMei-Yuh Hwang (Mobvoi)

Mei-Yuh Hwang obtained her Ph.D. in computer science in 1993 from Carnegie Mellon University. She learned the core of speech recognition from Dr. Kai-Fu Lee and Raj Reddy. After graduation, she worked at Microsoft Research, later Microsoft speech products, Bing Translation and Chinese Cortana, while serving as a researcher at University of Washington in 2004-2008. Her publications include speech recognition, machine translation and language understanding in the major conferences, IEEE journals, and U.S. patents. She joined Mobvoi in 2016 and is leading its R&D division in Redmond, Washington. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Mei-Yuh Hwang [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-mei-yuh-hwang [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-27 16:17:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-27 23:17:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8775 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [40] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8774 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 09:19:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-20 17:19:25 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, March 28, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

The wireless industry has put out a vision of 5G enabling extreme mobile broadband with peak data rates of more than 10Gbps, ultra-low latency with end-to-end latencies of less than 1ms and ultra-reliability to support mission critical applications. Current cellular networks that have been designed for human interactions and latencies of 100ms will transform into networks designed for real-time machine-to-machine interactions. In this talk, I will introduce 5G, discuss applications enabled by 5G, where to find spectrum for 5G and present some recent results in indoor environments.

Speaker

Klaus Doppler (Nokia)

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Klaus Doppler joined Nokia in 2002. He has contributed to Nokia’s 4G, 5G and Wi-Fi research in multiple roles. Currently, he is heading the Connectivity Lab in Nokia Bell Labs and his research focus is on indoor networks. In the past, he has been responsible for the wireless research and standardization (4G, 5G, Wi-Fi) in Nokia Technologies, incubated a new business line, contributed to Nokia’s radio technology vision and has led various research projects. He has pioneered research on Device-to-Device Communications underlaying LTE networks. Klaus received his Ph.D. from Helsinki University of Technology, Finland in 2010 and his MSc. in Electrical Engineering from Graz University of Technology, Austria in 2003. He has more than 75 pending and granted patent applications, and he has published 30 journal and conference publications and book chapters and received several inventor awards at Nokia.

[post_title] => Research Colloquium: Klaus Doppler [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-klaus-doppler [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-16 14:19:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 21:19:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8774 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [41] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8722 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 16:01:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 00:01:54 [post_content] =>

When

  • Friday, April 21, 2017 / 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 22, 2017 / 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Where

EE Building Benton Lane Seattle WA 98195 (For directions, download this PDF.)

About the Event

The UW College of Engineering's Discovery Days (April 21-22) is a great opportunity for students and families from all over the Puget Sound region to join for hands-on activities (like discovering the mechanics behind making a pickle glow and a robot shake hands). View a selection of photos from last year's Discovery Days: 2016 Discovery Days   [post_title] => Engineering Discovery Days [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => engineering-discovery-days [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-15 16:31:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-15 23:31:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8722 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [42] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8718 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:36:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:36:47 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Harnessing Microwave Signals of Opportunity for Addressing the Water Puzzle"

Quantifying stores of fresh water is of ever-increasing importance because of the rapid increase in world population while the relatively small supplies of fresh water remain fixed at best. With evident changes in the global climate, water-related issues have been identified by the intelligence community as an important factor in the US world-wide threat assessment. The first order of business is to know where and how much water there is (and where there is not). Only then will it be possible to predict the future trends in water availability and to develop adaptation strategies. The principle of microwave remote sensing has long been established as a means to quantify water resources because of the strong dependence of electromagnetic scattering in the microwave regime to the presence of water. Much of the environmental sensing work in our group has been motivated and designed based on the above recognition.  But numerous technical challenges remain in developing an affordable and capable water observing system. This talk starts by a brief description of some of the critical problems in the remote sensing of water resources today, and discusses how our research addresses several components of these problems by developing new spaceborne and airborne radar sensor technologies, as well as in-situ sensor networks. A major focus of the talk will be on the opportunistic and shared use of the microwave spectrum for devising novel water sensing systems. The emerging research for mapping profiles of soil water content (‘soil moisture’), variations in permafrost properties in the arctic and boreal regions, and ground water in arid/semiarid environments are discussed.

Speaker

Mahta MoghaddamMahta Moghaddam (University of Southern California)

Mahta Moghaddam is professor of electrical engineering at the University of Southern California (USC) Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, as well as the vice dean for research of Viterbi School of Engineering for academic year 2016-2017. Until 2011, she was on the faculty at the University of Michigan. She received her Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana, in 1991. From 1991 to 2003, she was with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California. During the past ~25 years of active involvement in environmental remote sensing, Moghaddam has introduced new approaches for quantitative interpretation of synthetic aperture radar imagery. Her most recent contributions include the development of new radar measurement technologies for subsurface and subcanopy characterization, development of forward and inverse scattering techniques for layered random media with rough interfaces, developing sensor web technologies for in-situ environmental sensing and transforming concepts of radar remote sensing to high-resolution medical imaging and therapy. She is a member of the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission Science Team, member of the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Team and the PI for AirMOSS NASA Earth Ventures Suborbital 1 Mission. She is a Fellow of IEEE and the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Mahta Moghaddam [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-mahta-moghaddam [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-08 16:31:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-09 00:31:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8718 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [43] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8717 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:35:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:35:38 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Recent Developments in Fiber and Wireless Broadband Access Communications"

The field of broadband communications has seen tremendous growth in the last several years, driven by over-the-top video streaming, cloud computing, upcoming internet of things and 5G wireless networks.  In this presentation, we start from the internet transformation driven by datacenter networks, followed by an introduction of the Google Fiber project, our achievements and the challenges faced by the Google Fiber project.  We will also review the latest development in wire-line and wireless broadband access networks and the enabling technologies.

Speaker

Cedric Lam

Cedric Lam 林 峯 (Engineering Director, Google Access)

Cedric F. Lam was a founder of Google Fiber.  He is currently engineering director at Google Access, responsible for the planning and development of scalable and cost-effective next generation access technologies to provide diverse and abundant bandwidths.  Prior to Google Fiber, he was working on transport and interconnect technologies for Google datacenters.  Before joining Google, Lam was chief system architect at Opvista which made ultra-high density WDM transport systems.  Prior to Opvista, Lam was senior technical staff member at AT&T Labs, Broadband Access Research Department.  Lam is a Fellow of OSA.   He has a Ph.D. from UCLA and B. Eng. (First Class Honors) from University of Hong Kong, both in electrical engineering.   [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Cedric Lam (林 峯) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-cedric-lam [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-11 16:15:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-12 00:15:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8717 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [44] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 8716 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 15:34:27 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 23:34:27 [post_content] =>

When & Where

  • Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017
  • 10:30 a.m.
  • 105 EEB

Talk

"Research journey: Scaling-up thin film solar cells and on-chip magnetic inductors for dc-to-dc power conversion"

The global energy demand is predicted to reach 28 Terawatts by 2050. Solar energy can meet a sizeable fraction of this demand. The cost of solar energy has reached 3cents/KWh, making it competitive with traditional energy choices. To harvest this energy, we propose the fabrication of thin solar cells from thin films of direct bandgap semiconductors composed of CuInGaSe2 and of earth-abundant, environmentally friendly materials. Another promising material for low cost, thin film, solar cell absorber layers is the quaternary compound of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), the equivalent of CuInS2 with Sn and Zn replacing In that is scarce and expensive. Electrodeposition of nanoscale metallic films and annealing in a selenium/sulfur atmosphere is one of the most promising, low cost methods of synthesis. Solar thin film panels are scaled to m2. We demonstrated scalability of thin film solar cells using a CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) absorber on 30 cm x 60 cm and full panel size of 60cm x 120 cm. This work enabled a 1m2/min continuous industrial scale line with 14% solar conversion efficiency panels. Monolithically integrated dc-dc power converters are enabling technologies for fine-grain power management of high performance microprocessors. Power efficiency of 90% or more is needed for many mainstream applications where the power dissipation is 100W or higher. Integrated buck converters need to be operated in a frequency range of 50-250 MHz and a very high inductor Q≥17@100MHz is required for the magnetic inductor. We have achieved magnetic inductors with the highest Q ever reported that are suitable to be used in 90% efficient silicon power converters.

Speaker

Lili Deligianni (IBM Research)

Lili DeligianniLili Deligianni is a Principal investigator & Research Scientist at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. Deligianni’s recent research interests include biosensors and bioelectronics, on-chip magnetic inductors and thin film solar cells. These are game-changing technologies which can be used in bioelectronics and power electronics with applications in digital health, mobile phones and IoT, and electric cars. Deligianni played a leading role in the successful introduction of electrochemical processes in the solder bump technology. The process became the standard in the electronic industry for joining of silicon chips to packages. She also co-invented the copper electrodeposition process for on-chip interconnects. The introduction of electroplated copper wire on silicon wafers has revolutionized the capability of computer chips. For the patents associated with the copper interconnect process, she received the 2006 Inventor of the Year Award of the New York Intellectual Property Law Association and two IBM Corporate Awards. She has co-authored 52 peer-reviewed publications and more than 130 patents and patent applications.  Lili Deligianni received her Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign and has been with IBM ever since.  She is an elected member of the IBM Academy of Technology. Deligianni served on the Board of Directors, and is the past-Secretary of the ECS.  She is a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society and has been the recipient of the Electrochemical Society Electrodeposition Research Award. She is a senior member of IEEE and of AIChE.  She is a member of AAAS.  Deligianni is also the past chair of the Watson Women’s Network and leads Engineer’s Week outreach in K-12 schools. [post_title] => Research Colloquium: Lili Deligianni [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => research-colloquium-lili-deligianni [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-28 10:02:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-28 18:02:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=8716 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 45 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11623 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2017-10-16 16:16:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-16 23:16:53 [post_content] => [post_title] => Colloquium - Device-to-Device Communications in LTE: Out-of-coverage device discovery [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => colloquium-device-to-device-communications-in-lte-out-of-coverage-device-discovery [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-16 16:16:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-16 23:16:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.ee.washington.edu/?post_type=event&p=11623 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => event [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 45 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => 1 [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => 1 [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 1ed8b97f0d2d9ad50ff42e6f2d720a68 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) )

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