Skip to main content

Continuous-time DSPs, Analog/Digital Computers and other Mixed-Domain Circuits

Yannis Tsividis


This talk will review recent work in our group, on circuits that combine domains usually kept separate. The first systems to be discussed are digital signal processors in which the binary waveforms used are functions of continuous time. No sampling is used in converting the signal from analog to digital form, and thus there is no aliasing of signal or of quantization error. This can result in much smaller in-band quantization error than is possible with sampling and discrete-time digital signal processing. Also to be discussed are input-output linear analog filters which are internally nonlinear, and processors in which digital waveforms are processed directly with analog circuits. The talk will conclude with a description of analog VLSI computers, which make approximate computation faster, and which can co-operate with digital computers to speed up accurate computation.


Yannis P. Tsividis received his BEE degree from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and his MS and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He is Charles Batchelor Professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia University in New York. Starting with the first fully-integrated MOS operational amplifier, which he demonstrated in 1976, he has done extensive work in analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits at the device, circuit, system, and computer simulation level. He is the recipient of the 1984 IEEE W.R.G Baker Award for the best IEEE publication, the 1986 European Solid-State Circuits Conference Best Paper Award, and the 1998 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Guillemin-Cauer Best Paper Award. He is co-recipient of the 1987 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Darlington Best Paper Award and the 2003 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference L. Winner Outstanding Paper Award. He is a Fellow of the IEEE. Among his teaching awards is Columbia’s 2003 Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching, and the 2005 IEEE Undergraduate Teaching Award.

Yannis Tsividis Headshot
Yannis Tsividis
Columbia University, Electrical Engineering
EEB 105
9 Feb 2006, 12:00am until 12:00am